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  1. #1
    It's what you don't see.. jamesjems's Avatar
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    Broke a star nut...what did I do wrong?

    Okay. So I moved to Gustavus Alaska, which is near rainy Juneau. I'm using my GF's mountainbike to get around and I desperately need fenders. So I bought a front fender from Apex which came with what looked to be a rather simple star nut arrangement; flip the fork over, insert star nuts into fork tube, pound them in w/a hammer just like the diagram said and voila...instant front fender. Well, that's not what happened. The first star nut cracked clean in two. I thought they would simply bend as the thing was pounded in, but it just snapped.

    Fork model is a RockShock "Judy." if that means anthing. (too small a hole?)

    Is this simply a matter of replaceing a star nut and trying again? Or am I a fool to think that the star nuts were designed to bend as they go in the hole?

    Responses much appreciated...

    James-the-splattered

  2. #2
    Wood Licker Maelstrom's Avatar
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    I have never heard of a fender using starnuts, most use compression bolts.

  3. #3
    fanatik Speedub.Nate's Avatar
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    You'll find that steerer tubes have different internal diameters at the base. This is the reason that fenders such as SKS come with three different sized compression fittings. I'm not sure what to suggest as a replacement since the smallest commonly available size (1" steel/1-1/8" aluminum) is likely too big for what you need. Did you contact the fender manufacturer?

  4. #4
    Throw the stick!!!! LowCel's Avatar
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    Star nuts definately need to be driven straight in. It is not uncommon at all for them to break when you try to bend them to straighten them up.
    I may be fat but I'm slow enough to make up for it.

  5. #5
    Senior Citizen DiRt DeViL's Avatar
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    One dirty trick for you.

    Push all the way down the star nut that's currently on your steerer tube and use it for the fender, then install a new one on the top.

    That should do it!
    "Life is not like a box of chocolates ...
    it's more like a jar of jalapenos.
    Whatever you do today,
    may burn your ass tomorrow."


  6. #6
    Senior Member jalexei's Avatar
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    Push all the way down the star nut that's currently on your steerer tube and use it for the fender, then install a new one on the top.
    Interesting idea, but if the bottom star nut is essentially "upside-down", won't trying to screw something into it just pull it out? Though I suppose a fender doesn't need a ton of tourque...

  7. #7
    It's what you don't see.. jamesjems's Avatar
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    thanks for the replies. In this small community w/o an LBS, I resorted to the hardware store where for $3.00, I jury-rigged an arrangement consisting of an expansion bolt for drywall combined with a rubber bushing sort of near the diameter of the fork hole. The secret was to not overtighten the arrangement, I think. In my younger days, I would have reefed on it and the whole contraptions would have collapsed. "Just tight enough" was suddenly the solution.

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