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  1. #1
    Mister Slick Matadon's Avatar
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    Thinking about getting an MTB...

    I've been giving some thought to mountain riding; after I heal from my latest roadbike crash, of course. DH looks like *loads* of fun, and I think I'm suicidal enough to enjoy it, but what other types of MTB riding are there? Any recommendations on a good general-purpose bike? I don't mind going hardtail (I commute on a Bianchi roadbike, made out of good 'ole Cromoly Steel, so I've pretty much lost all sense of pain in my ass and things...gee, that sounds bad...), but I'm thinking going FS would be better to start riding DH on.
    "The real race is not on the hot, paved road, the torturous off-road course or the smooth-surface velodrome. It is in the electrochemical pathways of your mind."
    --Alexi Grewal

  2. #2
    Senior Member MtnBikerChk's Avatar
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    if you ride dh, you will absolutely need a full suspension.

    do you get OLN? Watch it next Thursday - the Norba championships from MT Snow will be on - I think it's on for the next 2 Thursdays.

    Anyway - downhill and cross country events will be shown.
    Come visit my SEX arena at IRON MAGAZINE.

    Come ride the Monkey.

  3. #3
    Wood Licker Maelstrom's Avatar
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    I agree. While you CAN ride dh on a ht (I do know a couple of guys who have done it and live it) butit hurts a lot. OLN show Norco almost exclusively and they are great bike for dhing. In fact for recreational riders who want to go hard Norco are the best and toughest. Norco's are also reasonably priced unlinke most dh bikes.

    Really you have to decide if you want to have fun (norco) or offer competetive times (MUCH more expensive). Giant also makes a sweet dh as does santa cruz.

    You also have to decide if you are going to do any freeriding which is really a combination of dh, aggro xc and technical man made. If so then DO NOT get a dh bike. They are heavy and don't pedal well. you would then want to start looking at something more versatile.

  4. #4
    Mister Slick Matadon's Avatar
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    Fun, thanks; I've got the non-ideal body type for just about any form of racing[1]. I'll stick with competing in martial arts (something I'm also trying to find time to do again), and the occasional chess tournament.

    [1] 5'9", and just shy of two bills when I'm really hitting the weights; that, and my legs aren't that long. Makes me decent at all-around riding, and a pretty good sprinter, but I'm hauling around a lot more upper-body weight than any of the racers I know (then again, I'll kick their ass at rock-climbing...*grin*)
    "The real race is not on the hot, paved road, the torturous off-road course or the smooth-surface velodrome. It is in the electrochemical pathways of your mind."
    --Alexi Grewal

  5. #5
    Wood Licker Maelstrom's Avatar
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    Well norco has good quality entry level dh bike from 2200 cdn and up. They are tough too. Really that is the MIN that I would ever spend on a dually. (especially considering you are pushing the Clydesdale ranking )

  6. #6
    xc AND road WoodyUpstate's Avatar
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    Types of mountainbiking. . .

    1) XC. Cross country. Hard to define, but it is an all-around discipline combining climbing with technical skills. Endurance is a key part of this sport as time in the saddle pedaling is much more than other MTB disciplines. Can be as simple as an unpaved bike path, or as radical as a NORBA XC race course. Hardtails are still serviceable, but the world is moving FS and disc brakes these days. $700 for entry level hardtail, $1,000-$1,200 FS.

    2) DH. Downhill. Gravity powered top to botton, lift for shuttle assist bottom to top. Some pedaling required, but don't try to climb with these 40-50 lb. bikes. Lots of suspension travel on both ends and $2,500 to $6,000 for a bike that won't break after one season. Upper body is key to take the pounding. Racers like good acceleration, but races only last 2 - 4 minutes. Plan on expensive accessories like full-face helmets, body armor and lift tickets.

    3) FR. Freeride. What is this? Activity or sport. Big drops, lots of air. Urban or wilderness. Technical. Bikes seem to be a DH hybrid, more pedaling, so lighter with more gears. Have fun with stunts, but may not go anywhere. $2,000 and up for a durable bike you'd want and can beat up.

    You can have a blast on a hardtail, and even win XC races. You can ride DH on a hardtail, you just can't go as fast, and if it's an XC bike you'll beat it up badly fast. Lots of DH requires good equipment and mechanical ability to repair the stuff you'll break.

    XC is a journey, an afternoon in the wilderness hammering with friends or exploring a new trail. Maybe it's riding the bike paths with the wife and kids. It's versatile and a good place to start.

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