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Mountain Biking Mountain biking is one of the fastest growing sports in the world. Check out this forum to discuss the latest tips, tricks, gear and equipment in the world of mountain biking.

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Old 01-15-06, 07:02 PM   #1
warthog_ii
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Soooooooo I'm fairly new to mountain biking, only having had my Trek 4500 since September. In short, the Judy TT is a POS and I want a new fork

I've spent a considerable amount of time (hours online) today and last night, searching this forum, reading reviews, etc. etc. on different forks and other accessories. I decided on the 2005 Marzocchi Mx Comp ETA Fork 120mm at the outstanding price of $199. I do a lot of XC stuff, along with commuting...nothing super hardcore. I think it'll be perfect.

My question is, is fork replacement something I should do myself? I'm not experienced in messing with bikes, however, I'm definately not mechanically unskilled. I read these instructions...cutting the pipe?? My goodness. And I don't have a crown tool or whatever it's called. Is this something I should pay my LBS to do? About how much would that cost? I did buy the bike from there, after all.

Another question: What do you think of these pedals? I spent quite a bit of time looking at pedals...I want some where it would still be possible to use them with normal shoes. Again, should a shop install these?

Thanks!
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Old 01-15-06, 07:28 PM   #2
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You can do the fork, but do a search here for a bit more detail. PVC pipe will work to install the crown race. Cutting the steerer is easy, but you need to measure at least 6 times, and allow yourself a bit of stack height for future changes.

Those pedals are easy to install with a pedal wrench, and work with or without the correct shoes. Much better to get some soft-soled SPD compatible shoes.
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Old 01-15-06, 07:52 PM   #3
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A tube cutting guide would be a worthwhile investment for cutting the steer tube and keeping the cut square. Like Expatriate said, measure multiple times before you cut and give yourself a little slack. If you cut long, you can recut it or add a spacer. If you cut short, you have to work with what you have left.
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Old 01-15-06, 08:00 PM   #4
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Having your shop cut the steerer isn't a big deal. Be good to them, and they won't charge much. Less than $20 in most cases, which should include touching up with a file. They may even swap the races for you.
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