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  1. #1
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    Pedaling Technique

    Well, i broke down and bought a pair of clipless pedals, and have been clipping in and out all night (about 2 hours) just getting used to it and getting my leg trained.

    But, whats a good way to learn the pedaling technique for the clipless pedals? the whole spinning not "Push-Push" thing?

  2. #2
    is slower than you Peek the Geek's Avatar
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    You might consider picking up a book on mtb techniques. To paraphrase Ned Overend's "Mountain Bike Like a Champion," focus on a couple of things. On the bottom of the downstroke, concentrate on pulling your foot backward, like you're trying to scrape something off the bottom of your shoe. On the upstroke, don't think about pulling straight up. Instead, drive your knee toward the handlebar.

    A great way to work on your pedaling is with one-legged pedaling exercises. Unclip one foot and practice pedalling in a smooth circle with the foot that's still clipped in. Go a bit, then switch legs. At first you'll quickly see just how jerky your technique probably is.
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  3. #3
    Throw the stick!!!! LowCel's Avatar
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    Peek did a good job describing it, I just want to add that at the top of the stroke push forward. Your legs will get in the habit of the up and down stroke, it's the top and bottom that are the hardest part to get accustomed to.
    I may be fat but I'm slow enough to make up for it.

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    Newbie erhan's Avatar
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    I think doing fast spins also helps to develop a smoother spinning technique. During the winter I did a lot of fast spins reaching 180-190 rpm on the trainer. Now I can feel that I pedal much smoother than last year.
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  5. #5
    Throw the stick!!!! LowCel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by erhan
    I think doing fast spins also helps to develop a smoother spinning technique. During the winter I did a lot of fast spins reaching 180-190 rpm on the trainer. Now I can feel that I pedal much smoother than last year.
    Ouch, I do well to maintain a cadence of 130 - 140 without bouncing on the saddle. No way I could do 180 - 190 without bouncing.

    That does do a lot to help spin though. If you (op) are interested the way to do it is put it in a fairly easy gear, over 30 seconds slowly increase your cadence until you start bouncing. Once you start bouncing back of just a hair. Hold this cadence for around 20 - 30 seconds. Recover a couple of minutes then repeat. Do this about 10 - 15 times per session.
    I may be fat but I'm slow enough to make up for it.

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    Newbie erhan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LowCel
    Ouch, I do well to maintain a cadence of 130 - 140 without bouncing on the saddle. No way I could do 180 - 190 without bouncing.
    Me neither . I probably start bouncing at 120s. On the trainer, when I do 180+, I have to hold the front brake to keep the trainer from moving around in the room .
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  7. #7
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    The deal with clipless is pulling across at the bottom of the stroke.
    Act like you're scraping mud from the bottom of your shoe each time you go around, and focus on a round pedal stroke. That should do you well

  8. #8
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    You want to make circles with your feet. Don't think of it as a bunch of strokes (push stroke, bottom, top...) put together. its one fluid motion in a circle. Think circles. Spinning a higher rpm is also key, and will improve your efficiency and keep your knees healthier.

  9. #9
    Throw the stick!!!! LowCel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcoine
    You want to make circles with your feet. Don't think of it as a bunch of strokes (push stroke, bottom, top...) put together. its one fluid motion in a circle. Think circles. Spinning a higher rpm is also key, and will improve your efficiency and keep your knees healthier.
    This is very true, circles are the key. However you have to teach your legs to spin little circles. That is where the push forward at the top, scrape at the bottom comes in. I haven't read a book yet that didn't teach this method.
    I may be fat but I'm slow enough to make up for it.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by LowCel
    This is very true, circles are the key. However you have to teach your legs to spin little circles. That is where the push forward at the top, scrape at the bottom comes in. I haven't read a book yet that didn't teach this method.
    I learned on a road bike years ago, and haven't read anything about it since. I think that with increased rpm, its too difficult to break it down into strokes, its all happening to fast. Thats why I just think circles.. but what ever works.

  11. #11
    Uh oh... JagdNeun's Avatar
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    Pedaling technique? Just make sure you know how to clip out of those puppies in a hurry. LOL. I'm learning also, to stay out of them in really difficult rocky areas. I've found this out the hard way.

  12. #12
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JagdNeun
    Pedaling technique? Just make sure you know how to clip out of those puppies in a hurry. LOL. I'm learning also, to stay out of them in really difficult rocky areas. I've found this out the hard way.
    Bouncing around on rocky areas is where being clipped in tight helps. The feet do not bounce off of the pedals. Only time I would feel the need to unclip- is coming up to a place where I might be stopping, and then its only one foot. Worried about Going down? If its an off on the trail- then you are better to be clipped in. It happens so fast that you know nothing about it and a loose leg that is not still in the pedals has a chance of being broken. Only time you will find Clipless--"Embarrassing" is when you come to a voluntary stop and forget to unclip. Always happens when spectators are about, or the one you are trying to impress.
    How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


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