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Old 06-14-06, 11:37 PM   #1
cierrecart
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First new bike for me in a LOOOOONG time.

In all I invested about $500 on what is essentially now a brand new bike. The only used parts other than the frame are the wheels, but they are stock replacements and are in great condition.
Almost complete bike: $200
Hayes Mx1 Disc brakes and levers: $140
Rear cassette: $25
New chain: $10
Race Face grips: $10
Wheelset: $85
IRC V-Claw tires: $20

I impressed myself by installing the disc brakes, which were surprisingly easy to do. I've heard people talk trash about the Hayes mechanicals, but even after only a few stops, they are already performing btter than any rim brakes I've ever used.

I m having a slight problem with the rear derailleur and it not wanting to shift onto the largest cog, but I hope to have that sorted out soon enough.

Took it out for a ride tonight, and it is a freaking blast! It rides nice and smooth, but it's nice and solid when I take it down some stairs or go off a small hit.

I'm happy.




In its nice safe garage next to the wifes new bike.
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Old 06-14-06, 11:48 PM   #2
shakes00lude
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looks really nice man!

Old man driver too
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Old 06-15-06, 04:51 AM   #3
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Congrats on the new bike it looks great
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Old 06-15-06, 05:43 AM   #4
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I love the crankset.
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Old 06-15-06, 07:18 AM   #5
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Looking real good!
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Old 06-15-06, 08:17 AM   #6
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Nice.
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Old 06-15-06, 09:56 AM   #7
cierrecart
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Thanks guys...it's a freaking blast to ride.
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Old 06-15-06, 01:18 PM   #8
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Wow, great buy. I like the color, and the cranks.
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Old 06-15-06, 01:29 PM   #9
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Yeah...gbot a smokin deal from a guy off craigslist for the almost compete bike.
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Old 06-16-06, 10:05 AM   #10
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The Maintou fork on this has adjustable preload and a scrader valve at thr top of the fork. Do I just hook up my pumpm and fill it with air to adjust the stiffness?
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Old 06-17-06, 03:33 AM   #11
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As far as the fork, you'll need a high pressure shock pump. A regular pump won't work.

Also, if it won't shift into the biggest cog, chances are your limit screw is in too far.

There are two little screws on the back of the derailleur. The are called limit screws and they stop the derailleur from moving too far in towards the wheel or too far out towards the drop-out.

The best way to adjust is to hang the bike somewhere where you can stand by the rear derailleur and still pedal the bike.

While pedaling shift into the middle ring up front and the biggest cog in the back. Since I can never remember which screw is which, I use the simple trial and error method. I screw IN one of the two. A couple of turns. You pick. Then I pedal the bike and shift the rear derailleur. If the derailleur no longer shifts into the biggest cog then you've found the right one. If it no longer shifts into the small cog, then you need to unscrew that screw little by little until it will shift back into the small cog. Then do the same with the other screw.

Don't go too far or the chain will fall off to the inside or outside.

It's easier to do to turn the screw a little then shift up and down a few times. Then turn it a little bit more.

I've tried to explain a simple procedure in simple turns but I may have just confused you even more. If so, Sorry!

It's really easy once you understand what each screw does.
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Old 06-19-06, 12:02 PM   #12
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Well, it looks like the problem was that I had too short of a chain on there. Got that fixed and took it out for a maiden voyage towing my kids in the trailer. Lucky for me (or not so lucky) 3 blocks from the LBS, the chain snapped. Took it in and they replaced it with a decent shimano chain for $20 (as opposed to the $6 chain I'd got from Nashbar). The tech said it looked like the derail hanger was slightly bent, but that he didn't have time to mess with it right then. I was able to bend it slightly with my hands and now it shifts flawlessly. This bike rocks.
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Old 06-19-06, 01:57 PM   #13
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Sweet bike, but get rid of that Crate head!
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Old 06-19-06, 02:27 PM   #14
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Sweet bike, but get rid of that Crate head!

lol, thats my buddy's not mine.
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Old 06-19-06, 03:29 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by a2psyklnut
As far as the fork, you'll need a high pressure shock pump. A regular pump won't work.

Also, if it won't shift into the biggest cog, chances are your limit screw is in too far.

There are two little screws on the back of the derailleur. The are called limit screws and they stop the derailleur from moving too far in towards the wheel or too far out towards the drop-out.

The best way to adjust is to hang the bike somewhere where you can stand by the rear derailleur and still pedal the bike.

While pedaling shift into the middle ring up front and the biggest cog in the back. Since I can never remember which screw is which, I use the simple trial and error method. I screw IN one of the two. A couple of turns. You pick. Then I pedal the bike and shift the rear derailleur. If the derailleur no longer shifts into the biggest cog then you've found the right one. If it no longer shifts into the small cog, then you need to unscrew that screw little by little until it will shift back into the small cog. Then do the same with the other screw.

Don't go too far or the chain will fall off to the inside or outside.

It's easier to do to turn the screw a little then shift up and down a few times. Then turn it a little bit more.

I've tried to explain a simple procedure in simple turns but I may have just confused you even more. If so, Sorry!

It's really easy once you understand what each screw does.
To avoid the trial and error just look for the H and L markings on each screw, every derailleur has them, at least I know Shimano and SRAM ones do.
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