Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Mountain Biking Mountain biking is one of the fastest growing sports in the world. Check out this forum to discuss the latest tips, tricks, gear and equipment in the world of mountain biking.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 06-15-06, 02:11 AM   #1
古強者死神
Team Katana
Thread Starter
 
古強者死神's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Tampa, Fl
Bikes: None /cry
Posts: 426
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The clipless stuff is here.

Ok just got my spd shoes in the mail today, and I have had my mallet c's sitting around in there box for about a week.

Looks like I am all ready to go clipless!

But I feel that I should get a few things down first on my platforms... mainly a track stand so I can stay in the pedals during a abrupt stop. My bunny hop is ok but maybe not the greatest and my trail experience is nil. (just alot of road riding and urban rampaging with curb jumping and sutch)

So what do you guys think? put the mallets on and go for it or wait it out till I can hon my skills abit more?

I feel confident and I am not scared of riding with them and really look forward to being able to "spin" on those long paved trail rides I take each weekend.

Last thing, what will I need to take off my current pedals (stock on the piranha) and put on the mallets? can any of those "bike" tools your probably going to list be substituted for regular tools since my step dad is a mechanic he has alot of tools.
古強者死神 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-06, 04:47 AM   #2
No Mojo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Southern NH, USA
Bikes: Masi
Posts: 134
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I just started riding “clipless” about two weeks ago so my advice may not be the best but I’m not having any problems adjusting. I just picked this bike up and it came with the clipless pedals and I thought about changing them for a while until I got comfortable on the bike but I figured if I’m going to be riding it clipless I may as well start of clipless.

I feel you need to hone your skills you should do it with the bike set up how you are going to ride, however as I said I’m new at this and could be way off.

Have fun and good luck
No Mojo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-06, 06:08 AM   #3
junkyard
Fourth Degree Legend
 
junkyard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: American Gardens Building
Bikes: 2005 Kona Cinder Cone & 2010 Cannondale SuperSix
Posts: 3,826
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
just ride the clipless.
junkyard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-06, 07:01 AM   #4
GreenFix
Senior Member
 
GreenFix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Bikes: Specialized Allez Sport
Posts: 383
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by 古強者死神
Last thing, what will I need to take off my current pedals (stock on the piranha) and put on the mallets? can any of those "bike" tools your probably going to list be substituted for regular tools since my step dad is a mechanic he has alot of tools.
The only thing special abot a pedal wrench is its thickness. It is narrow enouch to grab the flats of the pedal between the spindle and the crank arm. Your step father probably has the correct size wrench, you just to be sure that it is thin enough. I have an adjustable crescent wrench that is quite thin that I am able to use for pedals.

Do not forget that the left side pedal (non-drive side) is reverse threaded (righty-loosey). Basically turn the wrench towards the rear of the bike to remove the pedals regardless of which pedal you are using. I tried to get a link to the park tool website (which is excellent), but I could not get onto the page. this page has great instruction too.
GreenFix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-06, 08:10 AM   #5
mcoine
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: southern oregon
Bikes:
Posts: 2,631
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by 古強者死神
mainly a track stand so I can stay in the pedals during a abrupt stop.
In a real abrupt stop, you won't usually have the time or balance to think about track standing. You will have the time to clip out, so learn that.
mcoine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-06, 08:13 AM   #6
FF 6800
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Long Beach, California
Bikes: 2005 Specialized hardrock pro... pike426, e.13 drs, fsa gap crank, formula k24's, and some more/2006 Scattante R-660 easton circuit wheels.
Posts: 594
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
install the pedals and just practice clipping in and out.
good luck
FF 6800 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-06, 08:15 AM   #7
cryptid01
one less horse
 
cryptid01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: East Jesus NY
Bikes: are better than yours
Posts: 5,600
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
1) Just go for it with the clipless. It's not nearly as bad as everyone makes it out to be, just pay attention.

2) You will need a 15mm open end wrench to remove your old pedals. Heed Greenfix's advice well - the left hand pedal has a left hand thread. You will need a 6mm allen key to install the Mallets. Put a dab of grease on the threads before installing and don't overtorque.

3) Have fun
cryptid01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-06, 11:23 AM   #8
Sinfield
Eat. Lift. Ride. Drink.
 
Sinfield's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: pdx
Bikes:
Posts: 572
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
get ready to fall at least once, generally at the most embarassing moment possible. Also, as you're falling try and remember not to break your fall w/ your hand. Watched my buddy break his wrist that way a while ago.
Sinfield is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-06, 12:01 PM   #9
willtsmith_nwi
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 1,398
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Go ride on grass ...

Riding on grass is a terrible experience. It's like riding on millions of little shock absorbers that slow you down. However, when learning clipless this is optimal.

Egg beaters have no adjustment screws to modify the release tension or angle of release. It's a static tension and you get either 15° or 20° or float before you release. You can cheat on this by pointing the cleat toward your big toe when you mount them. I have mine pointed straight now, but when I started I really needed that 3°-4° gimme for release.

On to shoes. The mallets are tricky as they are concave. Depending on the style of shoe you use, you may have to trim the some of the shoes. If you need to do this, you should mark the contact points at the edge of the shoe with chalk and shave the soul just there. Shims make the cleat stick farther out of the shoe and you really do not want this as it will wear out the cleat faster as you walk around the parking lot before getting on the trail.

Remember, do lots of grass and be prepared to crash ;-) Crashing will happen, there is no way around it. It's just a right of passage.
willtsmith_nwi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-06, 01:09 PM   #10
NuclearParanoid
...all of 'em?
 
NuclearParanoid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Montreal
Bikes:
Posts: 153
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
SPD pedals, it's fun and very performant!! The main advantage is that you're not only pushing down but you're also pulling the pedal. Or you can altern, push/pull A lot easier to climb hills! The pulling motion is great muscle exercise, it may be hard in the beginning, but you'll get used to it.

What conserns pedal adjustments, just make it loose at first so it will be easy to clip out. Later as you'll get better (which won't take a lot of time) you can screw pedal bolts tighter. Practice clipping in and out holding yourself to something.

Verify regularily if your shoe bolts are tight, they may get loose and in the worse case scenario, if you loose a bolt, you'll never be able to clip out.

Like riding on a horse: before learing to ride, learn to fall. Have fun with your pedals!!
NuclearParanoid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-06, 07:28 PM   #11
古強者死神
Team Katana
Thread Starter
 
古強者死神's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Tampa, Fl
Bikes: None /cry
Posts: 426
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Well I got them on just before dinner and went for a test ride. I am very very pleased with the Mallets they did exactly like I wanted them to. I was easily able to ride around the area both standing and seated on my regular shoes then I tried out my new spd shoes and went for a spin, very easy to unclip on the eggbeaters, the shoes I got are near perfect for the mallets no clearance problems with the cleats or interfearance trying to clip/unclip due to tread on the shoe.

I did not follow everbodies advice on practicing first, I just tossed the cleats on the shoes, put the shoes on and went but it worked for me I found it to be pretty easy to do and already feel confident to take them anywhere.

If anybody needs a multi tool the toepeak alien 2 was what I have and it had both the pedal wrench and both allens I needed for the cleats and the pedals!

Only mistake I MAY have made was there is a left and right pedal, I dont know wich side is wich as they looked identical to me and I didnt know there was a diffrence till I read the manual on them after the fact, but as they say "if its not broke dont fix it"
古強者死神 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-06, 09:22 PM   #12
willtsmith_nwi
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 1,398
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Left threaded ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by 古強者死神
Well I got them on just before dinner and went for a test ride. I am very very pleased with the Mallets they did exactly like I wanted them to. I was easily able to ride around the area both standing and seated on my regular shoes then I tried out my new spd shoes and went for a spin, very easy to unclip on the eggbeaters, the shoes I got are near perfect for the mallets no clearance problems with the cleats or interfearance trying to clip/unclip due to tread on the shoe.

I did not follow everbodies advice on practicing first, I just tossed the cleats on the shoes, put the shoes on and went but it worked for me I found it to be pretty easy to do and already feel confident to take them anywhere.

If anybody needs a multi tool the toepeak alien 2 was what I have and it had both the pedal wrench and both allens I needed for the cleats and the pedals!

Only mistake I MAY have made was there is a left and right pedal, I dont know wich side is wich as they looked identical to me and I didnt know there was a diffrence till I read the manual on them after the fact, but as they say "if its not broke dont fix it"
The left pedal is left threaded so the pedalling motion does not unscrew the pedal. The right pedal is the normal "right threaded" "righty tighty" that you are accustomed to. It would be impossible for you to properly thread the pedals in the wrong way. Cross-threading however is a definite possibility if you try to ham-fist a left threaded screw into a right threaded socket.
willtsmith_nwi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-06, 09:41 PM   #13
古強者死神
Team Katana
Thread Starter
 
古強者死神's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Tampa, Fl
Bikes: None /cry
Posts: 426
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
They threaded on correctly so I must be in the good.
古強者死神 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-06, 07:03 AM   #14
a2psyklnut
NCAA - DUAL CHAMPIONS!
 
a2psyklnut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: From Sarasota, FL sitting in front of a computer spewing random thoughts!
Bikes: Intense Uzzi SL, Masi Speciale, Trek 3700 Nashbar Single Speed, Old Cilo Road frame
Posts: 7,964
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
A little late, but for the sake of anyone else doing the same. I heard a good recommendation once for new "clipless" users. Only put one clipless pedal on, and keep the platform on the other. That way you are not completely locked in.

This is just until you get used to the cliping in/out technique.

I would put the clipless on your non-chocolate foot. (the one that you put down first when you come to a stop). Keeping the platform on your strong foot.
__________________
"Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, "WOW, What a Ride!" - unknown
"Your Bike Sucks" - Sky Yaeger
a2psyklnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-06, 07:03 AM   #15
cryptid01
one less horse
 
cryptid01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: East Jesus NY
Bikes: are better than yours
Posts: 5,600
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If you look closely you will see there are letters cast into the pedal body - L for left, R for right.
cryptid01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-06, 08:20 AM   #16
santiago
sarcasm meter: jerk mode
 
santiago's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Montréal, QC, Canada
Bikes: 2005 Kona Blast; 2005 Turner Flux, 2006 Felt F3C
Posts: 4,510
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
When I first put my clipless on, I spent a few minutes clipping/unclipping on my lawn and then went for it. I did have a problem in that I hadn't torqued the cleats tight enough so when I went to unclip, the cleats rotated on the shoe and it required a really tight angle to get off. I did fall once but it wasn't a big deal.

Anyway, I know I'm a little late to this thread but I really recommend the quick practicing and then just going for it. No need to worry about developing any extra skills.
__________________
First Class Jerk
santiago is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-07, 04:37 AM   #17
Dilberto
Senior Member
 
Dilberto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 942
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Also remember to always have one foot unclipped, BEFORE coming to a complete stop. Otherwise, you will do the embarrassing "timber" collapse. Trust me- I have forgotton to unclip a few times, and now I have scars on my elbows and knees. The real trick is to instinctively unclip either foot when an emergency stop, or wreck occurs. Remember that clipless now gives you the opportunity to bunny-hop far greater than being unclipped at all. Take advantage of that, by practicing obstacle hops.

All-in-all....clipless pedals will make pedaling more effortless, due to the push/pull effect of the attached footwear. Your cadence and strokes will also have more power, on each pump. Rough and bumpy trails will no longer shake you off your pedals. What bike did you finally get? I last recall you were inquiring about the Gary Fisher Kaitai.

Zach
2006 Trek 4900 Disk
Dilberto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-07, 05:37 AM   #18
junkyard
Fourth Degree Legend
 
junkyard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: American Gardens Building
Bikes: 2005 Kona Cinder Cone & 2010 Cannondale SuperSix
Posts: 3,826
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
this post is over a year old. i'm hopeful that this guy has adjusted to his clipless set up by now.
junkyard is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:49 PM.