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Thread: The Shred

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    The Shred

    I will of course base my final judgement on feel, but if I were to purchase the Kona Shred 06, I'm wondering whether or not my bike (Shred) would be able to keep up with my friends Bigfoot. I understand that the Kona is the better choice for DJ and Road, where as the Bigfoot is the better choice when it comes to the mountains. Luckily I live in BC, so I have access to all the great North Shore courses, some different mountains with some nice trails, Whistler and what not, along with some great scenic, easy mountain trails, but I just want to know if the Shred will be able to hold its own alongside my friends Bigfoot, and the bikes that other riders are using that are perhaps a tad more suited to such trails. There is of course upgrading, but I won't be riding too hard and the Shred is quite a fair price. I don't see myself upgrading for atleast a little while. I just want to know, will the Shred hold up in the hills, Downhill and NS and what not, both in terms of durabilty and in terms of the quality and control that I'll experience during the ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oomp
    DJ and Road
    DJ and Street, not Road.

    It won't do very well on the downhill sections because the 6 inch Mx-2 brakes will crap out on you.

    The Big foot would be better. 20 mm more travel, better brakes and more trail-ish geometry.

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    Thanks, I appreciate the reply. And I meant to type the word Street, but you know how things are. Deffinitely not a road bike. Anyways, getting the impression from most people that the Bigfoot is the way to go, I don't have a problem with it, was simply wondering whether or not the Shred could keep up because it'll take me a little longer to get the Bigfoot as it's more expensive. Sounds like it's worth it though. While we're on the subject, will the Bigfoot be able to handle large (not too large) drops? Can these bikes handle some of the more advanced North Shore courses as long as the rider is up to it and perhaps with some updates to the components? I've been told that the Kona has an amazing frame, where as the Bigfoot frames and cranks seem to break under stressful use. Of course I won't be riding the advanced North Shore courses as of yet, but it's comfortable knowing that as my skills advance I'll be able to take the bike along with me.

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    It can take SOME abuse. My buddy Nathan broke his bigfoot frame going off a 3 foot drop. It was a truck loading thing in the back of the store. He headtube broke clean off, and the bike was completely stock. He got a new frame for free from Norco though, and hasn't had any problems yet.

    If you really want to get a bike that you can a Norco Sasquatch for a bit more, and it's a FAR better bike.

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    Again, thanks for the reply. When we're talking about the Sasquatch, and you're saying FAR better, in what way? I understand that some of the components are higher quality, but using it you wouldn't have any problems with drops? Is the frame made of a much stronger material?

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    And if you don't mind, I have another question. Do you happen to know of any good sites that explain bike parts and their quality, the quality of different brands and types etc. Just good techincal information..?

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    Commited Suicide WannaGetGood's Avatar
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    The shread is way better than the bigfoot. The shread I would say can do more than a bigfoot unless you are used to your bigfoot. The bigfoot looks more like an XC bike, I don't think I could ever dirt jump, freeride, or do anything on it besides easy XC trails.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WannaGetGood
    The bigfoot looks more like an XC bike, I don't think I could ever dirt jump, freeride, or do anything on it besides easy XC trails.
    Well, you clearly don't know what you're talking about. Almost all the dirt jumpers I know use Bigfoots. Maybe you should actually check out the specs on it before you label is as a XC hardtail. And, the bigfoot uses the same frame as the Sasquatch and Manik.

    The sasquatch has far better componentry than the bigfoot, and it has a MUCH better fork. The Bigfoot comes with 120 mm of travel, and the Sasquatch is a jump up to 150 mm, which is sweet.

    Best way to get to know parts more is check out the product manufacturer's website.

    Shimano Components:
    http://bike.shimano.com/catalog/cycl...=1152661874731

    Sram Components:
    http://www.sram.com/en/index_content.php

    Marzocchi Suspension forks:
    http://www.marzocchi.com/spa/mtb/?LN=UK&Sito=usa-mtb

    Fox Forks:
    http://www.foxracingshox.com/fox_bicycle/bike_index.htm

    Those are just a few of the many, MANY companys.

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    Sorry for all the questions, but I'm trying to absorb. So the quality of the fork play a much larger role in Mountain Biking than I thought? A good fork will allow the bake to take bigger drops without stressing out the frame quite so much?
    I'm now giving some thought too the Sasquatch. I'd just like to gain a better understanding of what makes a better bike. Can the Sasquatch take larger drops simply because of the better fork?
    Of course I realised that the fork was important, I just didn't realize that a slightly better fork made such a huge difference, but it's something that I'm glad I learnt.. That is what you're saying right?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oomp
    So the quality of the fork play a much larger role in Mountain Biking than I thought? A good fork will allow the bake to take bigger drops without stressing out the frame quite so much?
    I'm now giving some thought too the Sasquatch. I'd just like to gain a better understanding of what makes a better bike. Can the Sasquatch take larger drops simply because of the better fork?
    Of course I realised that the fork was important, I just didn't realize that a slightly better fork made such a huge difference, but it's something that I'm glad I learnt.. That is what you're saying right?
    Basically. And the internals of the forks matter a lot too. Forks with crappy elastometer internals don't react well, and don't really last as long either. Forks with Open bath damping systems work amazingly(for the most part) and last longer(for freeride applications anyway).

    Having more travel makes taking drops and stuff MUCH easier, less stress to yourself and the bike.

    Wheels and Cranks are the second most important as far as strength goes (apart from the frame). These parts are where most of the force is applied. Low end cranks like Truvativ Blaze or Bontrager Earl (not Big Earl) often bend very easy, and make pedaling seem awkward.

    Wheels are very important too, cheap wheels will blow out on you. That's not fun, trust me.

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    Thanks for all your posts, I've learnt a fair bit, and I think that I inted to pick up the Sasquatch, which I'm sure will be a good ride. I've ridden my friends Bigfoot a number of times and though the frame of the Sasquatch is shaped slightly differently, it looks like the ride would feel quite similiar, probably better. I'll leave ya alone after this if you haven't already left, but what kind of drops will the Sasquatch be able to handle with a 6,1, 185 lb rider on top? And I know I'll be able to feel out the right size for the Sasquatch, but what size do you think would be good for a 6 foot person? Is the Sasquatch a bike that you would personally reccomend, taking price into mind?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason222
    Well, you clearly don't know what you're talking about. Almost all the dirt jumpers I know use Bigfoots. Maybe you should actually check out the specs on it before you label is as a XC hardtail. And, the bigfoot uses the same frame as the Sasquatch and Manik.

    The sasquatch has far better componentry than the bigfoot, and it has a MUCH better fork. The Bigfoot comes with 120 mm of travel, and the Sasquatch is a jump up to 150 mm, which is sweet.

    Best way to get to know parts more is check out the product manufacturer's website.

    Shimano Components:
    http://bike.shimano.com/catalog/cycl...=1152661874731

    Sram Components:
    http://www.sram.com/en/index_content.php

    Marzocchi Suspension forks:
    http://www.marzocchi.com/spa/mtb/?LN=UK&Sito=usa-mtb

    Fox Forks:
    http://www.foxracingshox.com/fox_bicycle/bike_index.htm

    Those are just a few of the many, MANY companys.
    One of my friends has one, I was riding it for alittle while, and couldn't see myself hitting any jumps with it becuase the top bar is so high, might just becuase of what I like, or becuase I shouldn't be riding a size 18" frame.

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    Well, no one should be jumping with an 18 inch frame!

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    You know far more than me, but I looked it up and the Sasquatch supension fork has 130mm of travel. :/

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