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  1. #1
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    Countersteering...

    I just had to bring this topic up again, recently I've been experimenting with countersteering and wondering how people describe it as "steering left to turn right and viceversa" and I've realized "countersteering" is real but is nothing more than a technique to throw the bike's weight opposite of the turn which in turn throws YOUR body weight towards the turn which consequently makes you drag the bike with you and consequently it causes.... A LEAN, a lean which makes the bike turn in the desired position, from my personal experience with countersteering and regular steering of my bike that is the definition I have come up for countersteering. Seriously, it makes sense and I've found out its the only way to ride tight berms and cut corners at high speeds, look at some pictures of riders going through berms or close to 180 degrees turns, you'll notice they have their inside arm stretched out and their outside arm flexed like they were steering to the opposite side of the curb but regardless their wheel is still facing towards the turn, this is because they are pushing the bike's weight farther away from the curb so they can lean more and they can prevent the wheel from turning too much and washing out...

    I'm no expert so correct me please if you can and you know but seriously that works for me, just try it, seriously, try steering right and leaning left and keep steering right to keep the wheel straight and facing towards the curve... your bike will curve insanely towards the left, its awesome for riding berms and probably the only effective way.

    It has been one of the most effective riding techniques I've discovered ever!

  2. #2
    Ride bike or bike ride? Hopper's Avatar
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    In a tight berm you throw as much of your weight into the lean as you can get away with. Countersteering in my opinion (the actual act of turning against the corner) is for when you have leant (or positioned yourself on the bike in such a way) so far as to actually break traction and the back wheel is finally starting to overtake the front. By counter steering you are able to catch the rear. Other people have said and actually use it to initiate a tight corner, I do not do this yet still like to think I can lean in hard and still make tight corners. You are correct in saying you push the bars away from the corner but this is because the lean pushes the bars inwards and the more you lean, the harder you must counter this, therefore it can be considered counter steering but not in the sence you actually turn the bars. The only time I initiate a corner with counter steering is on long open fast corners and I want to slide instantly, I lean into the corner and turn away, this is almost guaranteed to make you drift or if you are not careful will force you arse over tit.

    However you must realise it is possible to hold a drift and NOT counter steer. Here are two pics of me hitting the same corner. The first one I drift through the corner with both wheels and the front wheel is not pointing to the outside of the corner. in this photo I did almost lose it while showing off for the camera and pretty much had to do a small dab. It is actually an ugly slide this one because it is on a rather large bank, on flat it looks much better.



    The second photo I manage to hold traction yet still lean it over even further. The two shots I have completely different body language, this one I have tried to lean the bike over hard while keeping my body more upright. This leads to more grip through the tyres. I also do not lean as far forward in this turn while keeping traction, if you want to slide lean forward much more and twist your hips more. I also a,m trying to slide my tyre by using the outside pedal and putting as much force through it as possible.

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  3. #3
    Senior Member bidaci's Avatar
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    Countersteering work wonderfully as long as you have enough traction in the front. The easiest way to explain the feeling is that it the same feeling as you come around a corner quickly and see something in front of you that you want to avoid. You quickly throw the bike to the left, it then dives right (from countersteering) then you snap it back. we all countersteer at some point whether on purpose or not. It is especially effective to tighten up on radius curves when riding (gasp!) road.
    Bill

    - Serotta Columbus III - Aegis Trident SS TT - Trek 8000zx -

  4. #4
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    Circles ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Chone
    I just had to bring this topic up again, recently I've been experimenting with countersteering and wondering how people describe it as "steering left to turn right and viceversa" and I've realized "countersteering" is real but is nothing more than a technique to throw the bike's weight opposite of the turn which in turn throws YOUR body weight towards the turn which consequently makes you drag the bike with you and consequently it causes.... A LEAN, a lean which makes the bike turn in the desired position, from my personal experience with countersteering and regular steering of my bike that is the definition I have come up for countersteering. Seriously, it makes sense and I've found out its the only way to ride tight berms and cut corners at high speeds, look at some pictures of riders going through berms or close to 180 degrees turns, you'll notice they have their inside arm stretched out and their outside arm flexed like they were steering to the opposite side of the curb but regardless their wheel is still facing towards the turn, this is because they are pushing the bike's weight farther away from the curb so they can lean more and they can prevent the wheel from turning too much and washing out...

    I'm no expert so correct me please if you can and you know but seriously that works for me, just try it, seriously, try steering right and leaning left and keep steering right to keep the wheel straight and facing towards the curve... your bike will curve insanely towards the left, its awesome for riding berms and probably the only effective way.

    It has been one of the most effective riding techniques I've discovered ever!
    The nature of the beast is all about circles. Turning the bars right initiates a right turn by the bicycle frame, while your body continues it's original trajectory. Once the lean is initiated, continuining to steer in that direction will put you on the ground. The exception being when you are on a berm. It that case, countersteering will run you farther up the berm.

    Once you have your lean initiated, your front wheel should point where you are going. Oversteer to get you body upright again (for when you're sliding).

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