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  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Oct 2004
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    Tecumseh, MI
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    Giant OCR 3 I hope to soon own a Specialized tri bike.
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    Advice on a new MTB

    I am a duathlete/triathlete who has always stuck to on-road racing. I will probably continue to stick with that because I suck at trail running. I can't imagine how much more I'd suck at trail riding! That being said, I am in the market for a cheap mountain bike. I can't imagine spending a third winter exclusively indoors on my trainer. Up north here though, that's what I've been doing. The boredom factor of 4-5x per week in my basement is already getting to me, and that's just THINKING about it. Haven't had to do it yet. So since I just want something inexpensive for winter riding some commuting, and for occasional rides on the country dirt back roads around here in the other seasons I was wondering what you thought of a bike with these components:


    Shimano Altus 21 Speed, 7005 Aluminum TrailTuned frame, RST Omni191 T4 adjustable preload fork 89mm, TruVativ IsoFlow Crankset, WTB SpeedV Saddle, Tektro Forged Aluminum V Brakes, Alex X2100 Black Anodized Double Wall rims with Machined Sidewalls, Stainless Spokes 36fr/36r, Top1 Sealed Bearing Aluminum QRhubs, M-Wings Aluminum Bar, Stem and Micro-adjust Seatpost,Kenda ATB Blackwall tires.

    Thanks for reading. I look forward to any responses or suggestions.

  2. #2
    Member Falken2C's Avatar
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    Sep 2006
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    thats pretty good, I like the shimano and truVativ components. Im a little not sure about the Tektro V-brakes, especially if you're going to do some winter riding.

    The RST fork should be fine for an everyday bike, its not practical to have 400$ rock shox or manitou forks if your bike cost less than that, and if your bike already has a "good enough" fork.

    I suggest looking for a bike with Disc Brakes (at least front) and a 6001 Aluminum frame. The 6001 aluminum should resist corrosion (not the same as rust) better that 7005. You might want to get a cro-moly (steel) framed bike and add the components you want, because steel can handle bumps and stress a little better in my opinion, and has proven reliability in winter, just like with car bodies. The added weight is also good for traction on the snow, combined with those Kenda tires.

    Otherwise, its a decent bike for everyday use. We dont really need $1000 bikes unless cycling is a great hobby for you. Just make sure it can do the job and do it right.

  3. #3
    Senior Member mlh122's Avatar
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    Mar 2005
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    yeah it sounds good, i agree you might want to upgrade to discs, if snow gets in your v brakes they might stop a little less than nothing in my winters here in the NW discs would be nice too, but im cheap so i just pay close attention to how my brakes feel, and when they start to feel weak i stop and clean the mud/snow out of them. when they're just wet though they still stop pretty well. you could just ride it as it is and upgrade to discs if you find you are needing them.

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