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  1. #1
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    Mountain bike with hybrid tires

    I am new to the cycling field, and as many have posted, am on a budget.

    I want to basically cycle on the weekend. WIll be doing most of this for a fitness work out and hopefully get more involved as I start. the cycling will take place on paved roads and some bike trails

    As i was shopping around, a store rep at acme cycling told me to look into buying a mountain bike and changing the tires, ones thats are more hybrid..what do you guys think of that idea? or what are your suggestions or what models should i look into

    i saw a trek mountain bike hard tail i belive it was 320 or 820 roughly around 250$

    thanks

  2. #2
    ಠ_ಠ DevilsGT2's Avatar
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    Acutually, thats what I did the first year I had my mountain bike, before I got heavy into trail riding. I had a pair of continential avenues on my rockhopper, and it worked really well. If you are mostly riding on pavement, the tires will last a lot longer than if you had knobbies, pavement tears them up.
    Singletrack Mind

  3. #3
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    do you recomend someone, especially one just entering cycling, to go this route?

    I dont want to break the bank but at the same time get a bike to cover all my needs

  4. #4
    Banned. CrashVector's Avatar
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    thats what a lot of people do that are just getting into biking, or that want a more rugged bike for use on paved trails and such.

    If you are looking to get fit, then staying with the knobbies that come on your bike shouldn't be a problem. Pedaling against the added resistance will only make it easier to achieve your goal.

    If you really insist however, there are some decent 'hybrid' tires out there that will suit your needs. If you are only going with one set of tires however, remember that you have to get the tires that suit the most rugged terrain you will be riding. Semi-slicks on a loose dirt trail will leave you sitting in the mud more than on your bike.

  5. #5
    ಠ_ಠ DevilsGT2's Avatar
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    Acutually, I rode the trails in the park near my house on slicks (these tyres were completely slick see), and the only things that made me dismount were mud and sand. Granted, it was pretty packed, but dirt none-the-less.

    Just don't try any funny stuff.
    Singletrack Mind

  6. #6
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    Get a tire made for all terrain. Like this one for example. http://www.thebikeshack.com/pc-33585...26x195-fb.aspx
    Last edited by rmwun54; 09-28-06 at 01:27 AM.

  7. #7
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    Specialized Crossroads Armadillo Tires

    I use my MB for the same reasons and purposes as you...The first thing that I changed was the tires...These Crossroads Armadillo tires ride great on the street and still have good traction on dirt roads and gravel...

    They hold up to 80psi also...

    Check them out!!!

    Take care,

    Nestor


  8. #8
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    Tyres make a huge difference to the feel and efficiency of a bike. For the same amount of wortk you can travel at 12mph on knobblies or 15mph on slicks. Both will get you to the same degree of fitness but one is more fun.
    The typical tyre for an MTB on the road for commuting/bike courier etc is a 1.5" wide slick. There are a couple of true treadless slicks but most riders use a fine tread.
    As noted you can ride slicks on hardpack surfaces.

    Kevlar belted tyres will eliminate about 90% of punctures.

  9. #9
    MTB Patriot
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    what you saw was probably a Trek 820.

  10. #10
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    It sounds like, its not a bad idea to go this route for what i need

    Im thinking of staying away from used bc i get free service at the LBS and prob could help me out more

    question now is do i go with an entry level Trek 820 or the entry level Motobecane

    they both go around the same price

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