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Old 04-05-03, 01:07 PM   #1
BlkDragon
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newbie

As someone who's new to alot of the modern biking world, where would be a good place to start? I mean even looking at bikes.

I haven't looked at them in years..

Not really sure where to start. I can find the stores.. Just not sure what to look at.
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Old 04-05-03, 01:25 PM   #2
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First before walking into a store and letting a salesman talk you into something you don't need think of some stuff first...

1 - are you into long epic rides and looking at the scenery. Or are you from a bmx background or just a really aggressive athlete.
2 - HT or Dually. This can depend on background, style, cost and what you want to do.
3 - price - figure out what you can afford not what someone can talk you into
4 - look around online. Check out bikes and read this forum and others. You should be able to get a feel for the different styles and the kinds of bikes each style requires.
5 - Your size. If you are not average but large or small you will be limited. Not all companies makes LARGE bikes and sometimes the smaller bikes dont fit well.

Once you figure out what you may like hit the stores. Find a bike the suits your riding style and price range and it MUST fit your body. Buy it and ride.
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Old 04-05-03, 01:46 PM   #3
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1) long rides, paths and such. Planning to go into parks and such afterwards.. take it woords and back areas..

2) not sure what those mean

3) 500 to 1000

4) yup, I figured that.. that's why I'm here lol

5) average, 5'10
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Old 04-05-03, 02:04 PM   #4
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2 - HT= Hardtail.Fork suspension no suspension on the back
Dually = dual suspension - Suspension rear and front
3 - at that cost in cdn money you will more or less be stuck with a HT. I would highly recommend staying away from Duallies in that price range in our currency.

You need a basic xc bike ht with a good fork. There are many many many bike likes this. Since I don't know xc bikes I really can't recommend any good ones in that range so I will leave it to someone else. You choices are abundant.
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Old 04-07-03, 03:51 AM   #5
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There are lots of different styles of riding, from stunt jumping to going fast down big mountains. Your suggested style, just riding along trails, is usually classed as cross county (XC).
For sporty XC riding you can get some fine dual suspension XC bikes, but it may be better to stick to a front suspension/hard-tail design.
One of the prime advantages of hardtails of dual suspension is that you can turn the bike into a useful touring or commuting bike with little trouble. You just need to bolt on a luggage rack and fenders. This is very difficult to do with a suspension bike. Make sure the bike has threaded eyelets to permit fixing a rack, these useful features are sometimes missing.

For $800-1k, every company makes a good model, so you are better to find yourself a good bike shop and choose from their range of models. A good bike shop will ensure that the bike fits you properly, in height and length, and will allow you to swap out -some- components if you want to change them.
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Old 04-07-03, 05:54 AM   #6
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A comfort bike or hybrid might be a good place to start if you're just getting back into biking after years. A road bike will be awkward on rougher trails (you want wider tires for rough trails!), and a mountain bike will be slow on roads (unless you outfit it with smother tires.) Hybrids are between the two, and comfort bikes are specifically made as sort of an entry-level for people who haven't biked much. I'm very pleased with my Specialized Expedition comfort bike from last year, it was $390, and the price went down later to $350.

If you have a larger budget than that, a touring bike would be ideal for the kind of riding you plan. Those tend to run in the more expensive range.
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