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  1. #1
    cs1
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    Suspension fork information

    I was planning on either upgrading an older all rigid bike to a suspension fork or just buying a new ride. My knowledge of forks is about zero. Is there any online tutorials or buyers guide to help me get started? The selection of models is pretty big. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks


    Tim
    1999 Waterford RSE-11, 1995 Waterford 1200, 1989 Specialized Rockhopper Comp
    1989 Raleigh Technium, 1989 Schwinn Traveler, 1986 Specialized Rockhopper
    1984 Specialized Stumpjumper, 1986 Specialized Stumpjumper and just way too many projects to list.

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    Senior Member mlh122's Avatar
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    if you search for "fork buying guide" you find:

    Fork buying guide:
    http://bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=105395

    if the bike is the 1990 rockhopper in your sig, I'm in a really similar boat. my dad has a 90's hardrock that he wants a suspension fork for. as far as i know, with a bike that old, you are limited to a quill stem, or "threaded" fork. there are adapters to let threaded forks use threadless stems, but no adapters to let threadless forks be used on threaded bikes. so that will greatly reduce your search results. then you have to measure the width of your fork's steerer tube, and the length. it has to be the right width because a fork too big won't fit and a fork too small won't be secure. the length just has to be the perfect length or longer, if your steerer tube is 5.5" you can get a fork with a 8" steerer tube and just cut it. it has to be a very flat and exact cut, so if you are nervous about doing it right just have your LBS do it.

    if you are doing this yourself i like this site:
    http://www.utahmountainbiking.com/fix/index.htm
    or
    www.parktools.com

    or get yourself a nice manual like Zinn's bike repair.

    to help decide if you should get a new ride, it depends on what you intend to do. if you wanna use the bike just for light trails and road, and just want the fork so that it's easier on the curbs, roots, etc... and the bike fits great and runs great and you really like it, then just get the fork. but if you want to upgrade the bike because you want to move on to bigger and better things, and could picture yourself outgrowing that bike even with the new fork, then go for the new ride. Also I'd recommend not spending perhaps more than 50% of the bike's value on parts and labor. a '90 rh comp is worth perhaps $100 - $150 so i'd spend no more than $50 to $75, more or less depending on how much you like the bike etc...

  3. #3
    Custom User never's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mlh122
    if the bike is the 1990 rockhopper in your sig, I'm in a really similar boat. my dad has a 90's hardrock that he wants a suspension fork for. as far as i know, with a bike that old, you are limited to a quill stem, or "threaded" fork. there are adapters to let threaded forks use threadless stems, but no adapters to let threadless forks be used on threaded bikes.
    That is not correct. You can run a threadless fork on a bike that originally came with a threaded headset. All you have to do is remove the threaded headset and install a threadless headset.

    The steer tube size is another issue. 1" forks are limited but there are some available...I think Marzocchi has some lower-mid level ones available.

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    ed
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    If you're trying to keep it cheap, check ebay or Craigslist and get a used bike that's a bit more modern. You will love the advances in technology.

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    Senior Member mlh122's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by never
    That is not correct. You can run a threadless fork on a bike that originally came with a threaded headset. All you have to do is remove the threaded headset and install a threadless headset.
    yep i found that out doing a search after i posted that. that's pretty cool.

  6. #6
    cs1
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    Quote Originally Posted by mlh122
    if you search for "fork buying guide" you find:

    Fork buying guide:
    http://bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=105395

    if the bike is the 1990 rockhopper in your sig, I'm in a really similar boat. my dad has a 90's hardrock that he wants a suspension fork for. as far as i know, with a bike that old, you are limited to a quill stem, or "threaded" fork. there are adapters to let threaded forks use threadless stems, but no adapters to let threadless forks be used on threaded bikes. so that will greatly reduce your search results. then you have to measure the width of your fork's steerer tube, and the length. it has to be the right width because a fork too big won't fit and a fork too small won't be secure. the length just has to be the perfect length or longer, if your steerer tube is 5.5" you can get a fork with a 8" steerer tube and just cut it. it has to be a very flat and exact cut, so if you are nervous about doing it right just have your LBS do it.

    if you are doing this yourself i like this site:
    http://www.utahmountainbiking.com/fix/index.htm
    or
    www.parktools.com

    or get yourself a nice manual like Zinn's bike repair.

    to help decide if you should get a new ride, it depends on what you intend to do. if you wanna use the bike just for light trails and road, and just want the fork so that it's easier on the curbs, roots, etc... and the bike fits great and runs great and you really like it, then just get the fork. but if you want to upgrade the bike because you want to move on to bigger and better things, and could picture yourself outgrowing that bike even with the new fork, then go for the new ride. Also I'd recommend not spending perhaps more than 50% of the bike's value on parts and labor. a '90 rh comp is worth perhaps $100 - $150 so i'd spend no more than $50 to $75, more or less depending on how much you like the bike etc...
    Actually, I've picked up an old Raleigh Technium. a GT and a Specialized Hardrock since I've redone the signature line. I really like those old school MTB's.

    The links look great thanks.

    Tim
    1999 Waterford RSE-11, 1995 Waterford 1200, 1989 Specialized Rockhopper Comp
    1989 Raleigh Technium, 1989 Schwinn Traveler, 1986 Specialized Rockhopper
    1984 Specialized Stumpjumper, 1986 Specialized Stumpjumper and just way too many projects to list.

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