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  1. #1
    :\ ping of death troie's Avatar
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    I have 4 noob questions...

    1. What exactly is a skewer?

    2. What does a skewer do?

    example:


    3. What is the benefit of getting good pedals?

    example:


    4. What does SPD and XC mean?

  2. #2
    I drink your MILKSHAKE Raiyn's Avatar
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    1&2 A skewer is what makes a quick release wheel "quick release" To simplify: You tighten down the nut on the end until it's kinda snug then you push the lever closed to increase the pressure and that holds the wheel on.

    3. Good pedals offer a better connection between rider and bike. Not quite sure what you really mean with this question.

    4. Shimano Pedal Design XC= Cross Country

  3. #3
    DEADBEEF khuon's Avatar
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    Originally posted by troie
    1. What exactly is a skewer?
    A skewer is typically a rod with a quick release mechanism although I suppose that doesn't always have to be the case.

    Originally posted by troie

    2. What does a skewer do?
    It is used to impart a clamping force across a spindle or bolt assembly. Typically skewers are used to secure the hubs of a wheel to the dropouts of the frame or fork. they can also be used to apply a clamping load to a seatpost binder which clamps a seatpost in place inside a seat-tube. I've also seen skewers used in place of a micro-adjust set-bolt in the clamp for the saddle rails.

    Originally posted by troie
    example:


    The above skewers are used in the wheels at the hubs and are for securing the hubs to the frame and fork dropouts. The flat bottle-opener thing is a lever that activates a cam to quickly engage and disengage the clamping action in order to facilitate quicker/easier wheel removal and installation.

    Originally posted by troie

    3. What is the benefit of getting good pedals?
    Like many things in cycling, quality parts last longer, run smoother, are lighter yet stronger and sometimes just look cool. Good pedals that firmly attach your shoes will allow you to increase pedalling efficiency by assuring a secure interface between the shoes and the crank so that less energy is wasted in the pedalling action. Good pedals will also have features for making sure that while your shoes are secured to the pedals, there is appropriate float so as not to cause you kneepain. Quality pedals should also hold you in during the times when you need to be held in yet have a reliable release mechanism for the times when you need to disengage your self from them. Note that although I'm speaking mainly of clipless pedals, other types of pedals may be appropriate for the type of riding you do. Since I don't know what kind of riding that is or your skill level, a wide variety of pedals may be considered "good". Platform pedals are preferred by those doing lots of trials and more technical stuff with less pedalling while clipless is usually preferred by those doing cross-country or something that requires a lot of pedalling relatively speaking.

    Originally posted by troie
    example:

    The above pedal is an example of clipless pedals. They work sort of like ski-bindings and ski boots. They allow you to secure your shoe to the pedal via a mechanical interface designed to allow you to engage and disengage at-will.

    Originally posted by troie
    4. What does SPD and XC mean?
    SPD stands for Shimano Pedalling Dynamics and was one of the very first acceptable offroad clipless pedal technology. There are many implimentations of SPD but they all share some very common traits.

    [1] Two-bolt cleat pattern for mounting the cleat to the shoe.

    [2] Spring-based mechanical retention system used to secure the cleat (and consequently the shoe) to the pedal.

    [3] Heel-out release action.

    [4] Adjustable spring tension.

    [5] Recessed cleats you can walk on.

    [6] Retention force is independent of release angle.

    Many other offroad clipless pedal systems are SPD bolt-pattern compatible meaning they use cleats which conform to the two-bolt mounting pattern for the cleats. Shimano started the trend with their original PD-M747 pedal back in 1991 but many have copied the design. The picture above is Shimano pedal which traces its lineage back to the original PD-M747. Other pedal systems which use SPD 2-bolt cleat mounting patterns for their cleats but are not true SPD pedals include the Time ATAC, Speedplay Frogs and Crank Brothers Eggbeaters. You can mount the cleats from these pedals with any shoe that says it's SPD compatible but you cannot use the cleats with SPD pedals themselves.

    XC stands for cross-country.
    Last edited by khuon; 06-03-03 at 01:32 AM.
    1999 K2 OzM 2001 Aegis Aro Svelte OCP Club Member
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  4. #4
    :\ ping of death troie's Avatar
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    Wow, thanks for the informative reply. Id really like to change my pedals. Primarily because they are ugly and they dont move very well. They feel stiff and very dense, as if they will break easily. I do mostly off road stuff. Some downhill. Mainly gravel, sand and rock. I wear plain shoes when I ride, no cleats. What pedal would you recomend?



    Oh yeah, why does everyone keep saying trials?

  5. #5
    NCAA - DUAL CHAMPIONS! a2psyklnut's Avatar
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    For the type of riding and your shoes, you want a flat pedal. There are tons to choose from. If you're online, check out www.danscomp.com they're a BMX parts website and carry a large variety of pedals.

    You'll find a variety of options, but the big difference is the type of spindle (steel, chromoly, titanium), and the diameter. A lot of dirt jumpers and freestyle riders have demanded a stronger spindle and use 14mm spindles. The type of bearings also determine quality and price. Sealed bearings are much more expensive.

    You can find some pedals as cheap as $15 or as much as $125.00 depending on what you want.

    Also, Trials is a type of riding, that is slow, and consists of multiple hops to go up and over obstacles. The idea is to NOT put a foot down while hopping over rocks, rails, and jumping from one obstacle to another. Very difficult to do and requires years of practice.

    L8R
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  6. #6
    :\ ping of death troie's Avatar
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    Is it necessary to have a pedal wrench to change the pedals. I have a thin crescent that fits well, will that be suffice?

  7. #7
    Wood Licker Maelstrom's Avatar
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    Originally posted by troie
    Is it necessary to have a pedal wrench to change the pedals. I have a thin crescent that fits well, will that be suffice?
    If it fits. Your fine

  8. #8
    Senior Member Repp5's Avatar
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    A Skewer is also be the rod that you put your meat and veggies on when grilling a la SHISH KEBAB.

    Though I don't suppose this is any help whatsoever.

    Edit: Typo
    Last edited by Repp5; 06-03-03 at 11:59 AM.

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