Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Mountain Biking Mountain biking is one of the fastest growing sports in the world. Check out this forum to discuss the latest tips, tricks, gear and equipment in the world of mountain biking.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 06-06-03, 11:19 AM   #1
slcpunk21
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
slcpunk21's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: finally transplanted!
Bikes:
Posts: 454
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Fork vs Forks

Ok, I've notice alot of you say forks, which I don't understand. It's a single fork, not mulitple forks. If you ride down a path and it splits you call it a fork in the road, if you hold an eating utensil in your hand it's called a fork not a forks. So where does this forks on a mountain bike come from? The fork splits once from the steerer tube so there for it's a fork. I hope this didn't come across as bad as it sounds, I'm just curious how alot of you got to forks as apposed to fork.

slcpunk21 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-03, 11:23 AM   #2
a2psyklnut
NCAA - DUAL CHAMPIONS!
 
a2psyklnut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: From Sarasota, FL sitting in front of a computer spewing random thoughts!
Bikes: Intense Uzzi SL, Masi Speciale, Trek 3700 Nashbar Single Speed, Old Cilo Road frame
Posts: 7,964
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hmmm, when you come to that fork in the road, do you take the left fork or the right fork? So, there are two forks in one.

Honestly, I don't know the grammatically correct form of this word. Never really thought about it.

If anyone knows the correct grammar please fill us in.

L8R
__________________
"Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, "WOW, What a Ride!" - unknown
"Your Bike Sucks" - Sky Yaeger
a2psyklnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-03, 11:26 AM   #3
slcpunk21
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
slcpunk21's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: finally transplanted!
Bikes:
Posts: 454
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
See that is a good point a view. I didn't think of that

But for me I never say right or left fork, i say right or left side.

Please more info..haha.

slcpunk21 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-03, 11:31 AM   #4
Maelstrom 
Wood Licker
 
Maelstrom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Whistler,BC
Bikes: Transition Dirtbag, Kona Roast 2002 and specialized BMX
Posts: 16,885
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
For me its fork ...but hey I don't care. The only thing that bugs me is when people call the fork a shock. Just doesn't seem right
Maelstrom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-03, 11:41 AM   #5
pnj
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: seattle
Bikes:
Posts: 1,083
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
forks, been saying it this way for 20 plus years. I've hear all the arguments and refuse to say "fork".

although there are times, when using "forks" in a sentence, that it sounds strange, then I use "fork" (I can't think of an example right now)

I wear pants but they are only one piece. I don't call them pant.

I really don't care what other people say, to me, they are forks.
pnj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-03, 11:42 AM   #6
Gordon P
Guest
 
Bikes:
Posts: n/a
Mentioned: Post(s)
Tagged: Thread(s)
Quoted: Post(s)
Fork is singular, for example: Tuning fork. “The fork on my bike is blue.” Saying, “the forks on my bike are blue” is sloppy English. Forks I guess is the collective form.

Sheldon “linguist” Brown writes in his dictionary:
Fork
Usually refers to the front fork, the part of the frame set that holds the front wheel. The fork is attached to the main frame by the headset. The fork consists of the two blades that go down to hold the axle, the fork crown, and the steerer.
The term "rear fork" is sometimes used to refer to the part of the frame that holds the rear wheel.

Class dismissed, have a great weekend!
Gordon p
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-03, 11:42 AM   #7
RussellM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Bikes:
Posts: 130
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
no you cant choose from the right or left fork when there is a fork in the road. Neither one of those sides is a fork. THey are just sides. you wouldnt call each of the prongs on a fork(the utensil) a fork would you? they are just prongs. The only way you can say forks, is if there are actualy two or more forks. I have yet to see a bike with two or more forks on it. The only other time it would be correct is if it is a conjunction that somone left the apostrophe off of. Like my forks broken. Meaning my fork is broken. However in this case it would be fork's, and not forks.
RussellM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-03, 11:48 AM   #8
a2psyklnut
NCAA - DUAL CHAMPIONS!
 
a2psyklnut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: From Sarasota, FL sitting in front of a computer spewing random thoughts!
Bikes: Intense Uzzi SL, Masi Speciale, Trek 3700 Nashbar Single Speed, Old Cilo Road frame
Posts: 7,964
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I agree with PNJ, I don't wear pant, I wear PANTS. Even if gramatically incorrect, I think I'll continue to call them FORKS!

L8R
__________________
"Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, "WOW, What a Ride!" - unknown
"Your Bike Sucks" - Sky Yaeger
a2psyklnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-03, 11:56 AM   #9
RussellM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Bikes:
Posts: 130
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
you would call them forks, if there were more than one of them. Them, also refers to multiples. You would call it a fork, singular. You would call them forks, plural. As for pants, your right it has been miss used so long people find it wierd when it is used correctly, however you would say "I spilled somthing on my pant leg." and not "I spilled somthing on my pants leg"
RussellM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-03, 11:59 AM   #10
a2psyklnut
NCAA - DUAL CHAMPIONS!
 
a2psyklnut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: From Sarasota, FL sitting in front of a computer spewing random thoughts!
Bikes: Intense Uzzi SL, Masi Speciale, Trek 3700 Nashbar Single Speed, Old Cilo Road frame
Posts: 7,964
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Is it then incorrect to say, "I've spilled something on my pants."?

Not trying to be difficult, I find this topic one of the most amusing in awhile!

L8R
__________________
"Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, "WOW, What a Ride!" - unknown
"Your Bike Sucks" - Sky Yaeger
a2psyklnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-03, 12:05 PM   #11
RussellM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Bikes:
Posts: 130
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I agree, it is keeping me entertained. The difficulty with pants is you would reffer to them as a pair of pants, which just makes them confusing. Just like scisiors. You have a pair of scisiors. Now I dont know why these things are called pairs because pair reffers to two things that go together. Perhaps its because a pair of pants has two legs, and a pair of scisiors has two blades. So if you were reffering to a pair of things, then obviously its plural, being that there are two of them.

You wouldnt however ask somone to hand you that pair of forks. Perhaps because a fork does not by definition reffer to a given number of splits. Most things reffered to as forks have two, and in the case of a bike there are two, but the utensil has 4. A pitch fork can have a dozzen.
RussellM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-03, 12:06 PM   #12
a2psyklnut
NCAA - DUAL CHAMPIONS!
 
a2psyklnut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: From Sarasota, FL sitting in front of a computer spewing random thoughts!
Bikes: Intense Uzzi SL, Masi Speciale, Trek 3700 Nashbar Single Speed, Old Cilo Road frame
Posts: 7,964
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Panties?

Shorts?



This is fun!
__________________
"Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, "WOW, What a Ride!" - unknown
"Your Bike Sucks" - Sky Yaeger
a2psyklnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-03, 12:36 PM   #13
Maelstrom 
Wood Licker
 
Maelstrom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Whistler,BC
Bikes: Transition Dirtbag, Kona Roast 2002 and specialized BMX
Posts: 16,885
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Does anyone notice bikers are anal about the weirdest things sometimes
Maelstrom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-03, 12:46 PM   #14
Rich Clark
A Heart Needs a Home
 
Rich Clark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Bikes:
Posts: 1,387
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
It always seemed to me like it was mostly a King's English vs Americanese thing: "forks" in the UK, "fork" in the US.

The American usage is, of course, the correct one.

A "fork" has a "leg," a "branch," or a "tine," depending on what sort of fork it is. Things can have multiple forks, but it's not a fork if it only has one leg, branch, or tine.

Well, maybe if it's a broken fork.

I actually had a flat once caused by a puncture from a one-tined fork laying in the road.

If it'd had two tines, it still would have been one fork, and my tire still would have been forked up.

RichC
__________________
Training: 2002 Fuji Roubaix Pro (105 triple)
Commuting/Daytripping: 2001 Airborne Carpe Diem (Ultegra/XTR, touring wheels)
Commuting/Touring: 2000 Novara Randonee (Sora/Tiagra/LX, fenders, lights)
Rich Clark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-03, 02:20 PM   #15
dirtbikedude
Gravity Is Yer Friend
 
dirtbikedude's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: "Over the Hill" and going down fast in the 805.
Bikes: Scott Gambler, Scott Ransom, Kona Bear, Bianchi 928 Carbon/Chorus, C'Dale Rize4
Posts: 2,961
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Think of it like this, if you split the fork in two you would have two struts like the C'dale lefty.

So when refering to a bicycle fork technicaly the proper word would be fork since there is only one unless you have some weird design.

dirtbikedude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-03, 02:27 PM   #16
pnj
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: seattle
Bikes:
Posts: 1,083
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
what about handlebars? it's just one bar.

"dude, I bent my bars"

I really can't argue about "correct" grammer seeing as I failed english class more than once, but it's still fun.

pnj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-03, 07:41 AM   #17
chrisk
Village Idiot
 
chrisk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Vernon NJ
Bikes: '02 Giant OCR3 and an '02 Giant Rincon - yeah, I know!
Posts: 91
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
According to Webster's dictionary:
Fork - an instrument of greatly varying size with a handle at one end and two or more pointed prongs at the other.

So obviously the fork on a bicycle is considered one peice, not two that are attached. Wheras you were two pants because a pant is just one leg.

Not that I really care about this crap, it's just amusing. Anybody need a subject for their doctoral thesis?
chrisk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-03, 11:39 AM   #18
a2psyklnut
NCAA - DUAL CHAMPIONS!
 
a2psyklnut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: From Sarasota, FL sitting in front of a computer spewing random thoughts!
Bikes: Intense Uzzi SL, Masi Speciale, Trek 3700 Nashbar Single Speed, Old Cilo Road frame
Posts: 7,964
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Scissor or scissors?

L8R
__________________
"Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, "WOW, What a Ride!" - unknown
"Your Bike Sucks" - Sky Yaeger
a2psyklnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-03, 05:19 PM   #19
troie
:\ ping of death
 
troie's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: La$ Vega$
Bikes:
Posts: 1,381
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If you only had one scissor, it would be more so a blade. You need two. Thats why its called a pair of scissors.
troie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-03, 10:51 PM   #20
fubar5
0^0
 
fubar5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Rolla, MO
Bikes: Redline Monocog,Surly Crosscheck, Lemond Reno
Posts: 4,056
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Sheesh.


I say whatever flows with the post best.
__________________
Booyah!!
fubar5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-03, 11:42 PM   #21
jcivic00
keep moving forward...
 
jcivic00's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: NRH
Bikes: 2009 Motobecane Fantom CX
Posts: 403
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
reminds me about anothre forum I'm on. people say they're going to put headers ona 4 cyl. car. one header for 4 cyl, 2 headers for 6 and 8. lol the argument continues...
jcivic00 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:44 AM.