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  1. #1
    MTN Bikin'
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    Converting for light/moderate trail duty...?

    So, I was given a Giant Sedona LX for free and I want to see if it's possible to switch out a few things to make it capable, for a total newb, on some trails and whatnot. The bike is a comfort bike, so it has very tall handle bars that I was thinking about changing out for some flats. I searched around in here and didn't find much about converting a comfort bike, so I figured I should ask.

    If it is at all possible, could you let me know where to start, or what kind of things I could do to make it a little more off-road worthy? I really appreciate your time guys and gals! Thanks for looking.

    -Jared

  2. #2
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pirate golf
    So, I was given a Giant Sedona LX for free and I want to see if it's possible to switch out a few things to make it capable, for a total newb, on some trails and whatnot. The bike is a comfort bike, so it has very tall handle bars that I was thinking about changing out for some flats. I searched around in here and didn't find much about converting a comfort bike, so I figured I should ask.

    If it is at all possible, could you let me know where to start, or what kind of things I could do to make it a little more off-road worthy? I really appreciate your time guys and gals! Thanks for looking.

    -Jared
    The first rule of upgrades is "Don't put a lot of makeup on a pig and expect a supermodel." I'd change out the handle bars and stem for something flatter. Get a 5 or 7 degree stem and you are already on the right track for the bars.

    You might want to look into another crank because a 48 tooth crank is kinda big for a mountain bike. You don't have a lot of clearance for rocks and stuff.

    Get rid of that sofa it has for a saddle. Don't invest a lot of money on a new saddle but get rid of that one.

    That's about all I'd do to it. Then ride it. Try to break it. Don't expect too much out of it...it is a pig after all ...but have fun and learn how to ride. Then get a better bike. If you haven't broken it by that time, pass it on to someone else.
    Stuart Black
    Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
    Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
    Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
    Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
    An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.

  3. #3
    MTN Bikin'
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    So, after some reading around on here, it seems like I might be losing some power from the suspension forks. Since this bike is 99% commuter, this is an issue for me. I'm getting some kevlar-lined slicks in a few days and I will be getting a rack and pack for it a week or so after that. I figured a good upgrade for this thing will be to get rid of the mushy front suspension. I really don't need the dampening because my 'off-road' adventures will be very light.

    Also, I'd like to change out the stem (I think that's what it's called... sorry I'm a newb) to something that will set the handle bars a bit lower. I want to be able to lean forward a bit more.

    I was searching around on here and I found a post that said this particular bike ('04) was very upgradeable. Where the hell do I look for these 'upgrades'? How would I go about finding out what will fit and what won't? What specs (lengths, diameters, etc.) do I look at when changing out these two things?

    I really appreciate all of the help man! You've been great so far!

  4. #4
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pirate golf
    So, after some reading around on here, it seems like I might be losing some power from the suspension forks. Since this bike is 99% commuter, this is an issue for me. I'm getting some kevlar-lined slicks in a few days and I will be getting a rack and pack for it a week or so after that. I figured a good upgrade for this thing will be to get rid of the mushy front suspension. I really don't need the dampening because my 'off-road' adventures will be very light.

    Also, I'd like to change out the stem (I think that's what it's called... sorry I'm a newb) to something that will set the handle bars a bit lower. I want to be able to lean forward a bit more.

    I was searching around on here and I found a post that said this particular bike ('04) was very upgradeable. Where the hell do I look for these 'upgrades'? How would I go about finding out what will fit and what won't? What specs (lengths, diameters, etc.) do I look at when changing out these two things?

    I really appreciate all of the help man! You've been great so far!
    Upgrades are things you, or pay someone to, bolt on to make the bike ride better. It can be as simple as a new set of grips or a new saddle or as complicated as replacing the whole drive train. The thing that all upgrades have in common is money Sometimes a little, sometimes a whole lot. Changing the bars, the stem and the saddle are cheap upgrades and are worth doing on just about any bike. Changing other stuff...like forks, drivetrains, wheels...is more expensive and need to be looked at with an eye to what the overall bike is worth before you start.

    For example, this bike would probably make a great commuter bike. It'd be worth a relatively inexpensive new rigid fork (along with the other stuff you plan on changing). It would give you years of good solid service as a commuter with some light duty trail riding thrown in.

    But, if you want a bike that will work as a mountain bike and a commuter, or if you want one that will let you do rugged off-road riding, you'll find that you'll need to spend a bunch of money to get this one up to snuff. Probably much more then what you'd pay for a whole new, off-road worthy, mountain bike. I've got lots of bikes at home that I have done the 'great grandpappy's axe*' thing to. But I started with a good frame. The Sedona just isn't that great a bike to begin with.

    Like I said, change some stuff. Don't spend a lot of money doing it ($200 would be almost too much) and ride the bike. It'll do for that. Anything more, look at a new bike.


    *Great Grandpappy's axe: That axe has been in my family for 10 generations. It belonged to my great grandpappy. He cut down whole forests with it. It's had 8 new handles and 3 new heads but it's great grandpappy's axe alright
    Stuart Black
    Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
    Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
    Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
    Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
    An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.

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