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  1. #1
    GNB
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    Dumb Q - clip pedals on mtn bikes?

    I am just getting into Mtn biking (I like to road bike) and I was wondering if ppl used clip pedals like Look, etc... on mtn bikes. Could I just throw a set off of a road bike on there? Thx.

    -GNB

  2. #2
    sarcasm meter: jerk mode santiago's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GNB View Post
    I am just getting into Mtn biking (I like to road bike) and I was wondering if ppl used clip pedals like Look, etc... on mtn bikes. Could I just throw a set off of a road bike on there? Thx.

    -GNB
    Clipless pedals are definitely used especially for Cross-Country (XC) style riding, which is the closest to road riding. Look pedals won't work well but recommend you look at anything from Shimano's line, Crank Brothers, Speedplay, Time, etc.

    Visit your LBS, see what your friends ride and do a few searches in this forum.
    First Class Jerk

  3. #3
    Topic Killer Captain Crash's Avatar
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    Is it just me, or am I the only one that finds bmx platform pedals are good for downhilling? Never had a problem with anything. Went off a 6 foot drop, by the way, and my bike is still alright.

    Is clipless that necessary?

    -Captain

  4. #4
    Senior Member Breitling's Avatar
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    It's not necessary, especially for downhill.
    I ride mostly XC and find that clipless helps out a ton.
    "Get a bicycle. You will not regret it. If you live." -Mark Twain

    Orbea Onix (Ultegra/105)

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    ed
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Crash View Post
    Is clipless that necessary?
    You probably don't pay much attention to DH racing, nor Freeriding for that matter. Most DH'ers and Freeriders that I know use platforms. Have you researched it that much?

    Your question could be taken two ways. I don't know why you narrowed your statement down to DH because the OP wasn't even asking about that aspect of riding.

    1. You are genuinely asking if clipless is necessary.
    2. You think what you're doing is fine and anyone who doesn't use platforms like you do is rediculous.

    Honestly, if I were to do DH racing where I'd occasionally drop a foot for cornering aggressively...I'd most likely ride platforms too.

    For other types of riding, I'd probably stick with my SPD's. For the All Mountain riding that I do right now, I find that I am not afraid to corner aggressively w/o dropping my foot off my pedals.

    I think it's a comfort zone thing. I'd like to be able to ride on flats the way I can ride on SPD's, but I can bunnyhop much higher with that added "cheater" plus I can pedal much more efficiently with clipless pedals. I can pull up with one leg as I push with the other. In really rough sections of trail when my bike is bouncing around...I don't accidentally lose my footing.

    So in the case of the Captain...no. Actually if all you're doing is going downhill, pedals aren't necessary. Just sit down, hold your feet up, and hang on. But don't forget other scopes of riding.

  6. #6
    Old School Rad mtnbiker66's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Crash View Post
    Is it just me, or am I the only one that finds bmx platform pedals are good for downhilling? Never had a problem with anything. Went off a 6 foot drop, by the way, and my bike is still alright.

    Is clipless that necessary?

    -Captain
    You really can't compare DH racing with freeriding.It's as different as night and day.The only thing they have in common is gravity. If you go to a big race you'll see a good mix of DH riders on clipless and platforms. You'll see very few hardcore freeride guys on clipless.
    Like a circus monkey on a stolen Harley......

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    clipless pedals are great for xc biking but practice with them first because there's alot more unexpected dismounts where you have to get unclipped than road biking. good luck though.

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    GNB
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    What I'll actually be riding on

    Well, let me clarify a little bit more. The local trail right near my house I like to ride on a lot is pretty much flat...it might as well be paved. So, I figured clips might help out a bit or make it more fun and efficient. So would road bike clips and shoes be ok for that. Also, what's the difference between road and off road shoes!? I thought they were the same! Does it really matter for what I will be using them for?

    -GNB

  9. #9
    Topic Killer Captain Crash's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chelboed View Post
    You probably don't pay much attention to DH racing, nor Freeriding for that matter. Most DH'ers and Freeriders that I know use platforms. Have you researched it that much?

    Your question could be taken two ways. I don't know why you narrowed your statement down to DH because the OP wasn't even asking about that aspect of riding.

    1. You are genuinely asking if clipless is necessary.
    2. You think what you're doing is fine and anyone who doesn't use platforms like you do is ridiculous.

    Honestly, if I were to do DH racing where I'd occasionally drop a foot for cornering aggressively...I'd most likely ride platforms too.

    For other types of riding, I'd probably stick with my SPD's. For the All Mountain riding that I do right now, I find that I am not afraid to corner aggressively w/o dropping my foot off my pedals.

    I think it's a comfort zone thing. I'd like to be able to ride on flats the way I can ride on SPD's, but I can bunnyhop much higher with that added "cheater" plus I can pedal much more efficiently with clipless pedals. I can pull up with one leg as I push with the other. In really rough sections of trail when my bike is bouncing around...I don't accidentally lose my footing.

    So in the case of the Captain...no. Actually if all you're doing is going downhill, pedals aren't necessary. Just sit down, hold your feet up, and hang on. But don't forget other scopes of riding.
    I actually was sort of asking why so many people like clipless. Any day I have my fine-treaded etenies on, I never have a problem with my feet flying off the pedals, even on un-expected jumps. I don't know what you would call what I do.. Its like a fusion of downhill and freeride.

    I guess it makes more sense to call it downhill freeride?

    I don't know. I kind of made myself sound stupid, I know you don't NEED clipless, but I understand that some people like it. Just as I like my platform pedals.

    The only wrong way to ride is not riding.

    -Captain

    Oh, and I guess offroad shoes have more tread for when you clip out? I don't really know.

  10. #10
    Senior Member MudPie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GNB View Post
    Well, let me clarify a little bit more. The local trail right near my house I like to ride on a lot is pretty much flat...it might as well be paved. So, I figured clips might help out a bit or make it more fun and efficient. So would road bike clips and shoes be ok for that. Also, what's the difference between road and off road shoes!? I thought they were the same! Does it really matter for what I will be using them for?

    -GNB
    When you refer to "clips", do you mean "clipless"? In general, clips refer to toe clips and straps, in which the strap must be manually released by unsecuriing a buckle. I'm pretty sure you mean "clipless", in which the shoe is released by rotating the foot. (I just want to make sure).

    In the chance you do mean "clips", this would be a very poor idea for mountain riding, since you won't have time to reach down and undo the buckle quick enough to avoid a fall.

    Assuming you do mean "clipless", your road shoes and pedals would work. A few features of mountain pedals and clips make a better choice. Most mountain biking shoes have aggressive soles to dig into dirt/mud in the event of a hike-a-bike; most mountain pedals are designed not to load with mud, mud makes entry and disengagement more difficult; most mountain shoes and pedals are designed to be more rugged, since it's not uncommon to scrape/whack your foot into obstacles such as rocks, trees, water, shrubery...

    I'm assuming the spindle threads are the same on road and mountain pedals.

    I'd analogize as follows: you can wear leather soled dress shoes on a hike. The shoes will work and you'll be able to walk, but were not designed to handle the environment.

  11. #11
    fat + slow dmaxwell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MudPie View Post
    In the chance you do mean "clips", this would be a very poor idea for mountain riding, since you won't have time to reach down and undo the buckle quick enough to avoid a fall.
    I don't think they're not half as bad as you say. Probably no harder then getting out of clipless pedals, just a different motion. Perhaps if you have super-duper intense pedals with equally intense shoes that mate up with them really well, but wearing average shoes with a pair of mountain bike pedals and clips, no trouble.

  12. #12
    Senior Member MudPie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmaxwell View Post
    I don't think they're not half as bad as you say. Probably no harder then getting out of clipless pedals, just a different motion. Perhaps if you have super-duper intense pedals with equally intense shoes that mate up with them really well, but wearing average shoes with a pair of mountain bike pedals and clips, no trouble.
    We might be thinking of different kinds of clips. I was referring the road clips, where the shoe's cleat can only be disengaged by unsecuring the buckle, creating slack in the strap lifting the foot straight up 1/2", and sliding the foot rearward. Definitely old school. I remember using these in the mid to late 80's.

    The cleat has a vertical slot, about 1/2" deep, that postitively engages into a vertical plate, usually the rearmost part of the pedal.

    I doubt the original poster was referring to this type of cleat, but just wanted to be clear and eliminate misunderstandings.

  13. #13
    GNB
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    Thanks!!

    Quote Originally Posted by MudPie View Post
    When you refer to "clips", do you mean "clipless"? In general, clips refer to toe clips and straps, in which the strap must be manually released by unsecuriing a buckle. I'm pretty sure you mean "clipless", in which the shoe is released by rotating the foot. (I just want to make sure).

    In the chance you do mean "clips", this would be a very poor idea for mountain riding, since you won't have time to reach down and undo the buckle quick enough to avoid a fall.

    Assuming you do mean "clipless", your road shoes and pedals would work. A few features of mountain pedals and clips make a better choice. Most mountain biking shoes have aggressive soles to dig into dirt/mud in the event of a hike-a-bike; most mountain pedals are designed not to load with mud, mud makes entry and disengagement more difficult; most mountain shoes and pedals are designed to be more rugged, since it's not uncommon to scrape/whack your foot into obstacles such as rocks, trees, water, shrubery...

    I'm assuming the spindle threads are the same on road and mountain pedals.

    I'd analogize as follows: you can wear leather soled dress shoes on a hike. The shoes will work and you'll be able to walk, but were not designed to handle the environment.
    Thanks!! This answered my questions!! I did mean clipless btw! Now I know!! :-) Thx!!

  14. #14
    fat + slow dmaxwell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MudPie View Post
    We might be thinking of different kinds of clips. I was referring the road clips, where the shoe's cleat can only be disengaged by unsecuring the buckle, creating slack in the strap lifting the foot straight up 1/2", and sliding the foot rearward. Definitely old school. I remember using these in the mid to late 80's.

    The cleat has a vertical slot, about 1/2" deep, that postitively engages into a vertical plate, usually the rearmost part of the pedal.

    I doubt the original poster was referring to this type of cleat, but just wanted to be clear and eliminate misunderstandings.
    I figured that's what you meant, and that's why I unclearly mentioned mountain bike pedals and clips most of which are not as aggressive as those old school road bike setups. Those were impossible to get out of and you're right would be a horrible idea. Most of the mountain biking ones were a more basic flat with a toe clip attached that would give you some benefit but your feet would pop out of with a tug. I don't think those are a bad idea for the casual cyclist.

  15. #15
    ed
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Crash View Post
    I actually was sort of asking why so many people like clipless. Any day I have my fine-treaded etenies on, I never have a problem with my feet flying off the pedals, even on un-expected jumps. I don't know what you would call what I do.. Its like a fusion of downhill and freeride.

    I guess it makes more sense to call it downhill freeride?

    I don't know. I kind of made myself sound stupid, I know you don't NEED clipless, but I understand that some people like it. Just as I like my platform pedals.

    The only wrong way to ride is not riding.

    -Captain

    Oh, and I guess offroad shoes have more tread for when you clip out? I don't really know.
    You could call it "Dforwenehriildle."

    That's DOWNHILL + freeride = DfOrWeNeHrIiLdLe

    I think it looks Scandanavian or maybe German. Yeah, it's German for Fusion MTB'ing.

    (I miss my etnies...haven't worn them since I quit skating, hehe)

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