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Old 02-01-08, 10:39 PM   #1
Zan
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Clipless pedal suggestions?

Hello!

I'm looking to get a couple sets of clipless pedals. I've not used them before, no, but I am interested in getting some 'cause of the benefits. I ride around with platform pedals and straps, and I'm tired of it - I want the proper gear.

I need two sets 'cause I want a set for my road bike and a set for my mountain bike. I don't race on either bike, so weight really isn't an issue. I'm looking for the best quality I can get with the money I have. I don't want something that will break... easily.

Questions:

I'm looking to spend maybe 40 - 50$ per set of pedals. What are some pedal models you would recommend to me? Are there any "decent" pedals in that price range?

Are all clipless pedals the same in terms of fit? Do I need a certain style of cleats for a certain pedal, or is it all/mostly universal? Can I use the same set of shoes (and cleats) on different types of pedals/makes? Or would I need specific shoes/cleats for specific pedals?

Are clipless pedals generally the same, in terms of how they work? I mean: is the method the same for pretty much all the pedals? I'm curious if it'd be better to buy two sets of the same model for both bikes.

Anything else a noob should know about clipless pedals before he goes out and gets a set?

Thanks for the input!

Last edited by Zan; 02-01-08 at 10:45 PM.
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Old 02-01-08, 11:00 PM   #2
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I ahve the same pedals on bith the Road bike and the Mtb.
Figured this was I don't have to buy 2 pairs of shoes, and can walk when I want
while road riding. And I end up with an extra set of cleats!

After having tried 3 or 4 types over the years, I've settled on the
Shimano 959 type clip in pedal.
This year its the '08 XT or xtr pedal.
Consistant release, even when dirty.
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Old 02-01-08, 11:02 PM   #3
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I like eggbeaters. They don't clog up as much as a set of Shimano pedals I had. You can find them online for around your pricerange. I've only used the Crank Bros and Shimano so maybe others differ but I doubt it. You press down and forward to engage and rotate your ankle to the outside to disengage. Each pedal comes with a cleat suitable for use in its makers line. All shimano cleats fit shimano pedals and all Crank Bros cleats fit .... Maybe Time or some of the others do it differently but again, I doubt it. The cleats don't work on different brands, as far as I know. Providing the pedals are the same the shoes can be used on any bike but MTN shoes are a little flexier than road shoes so you can hike if needed.
I strongly recomend some practice before hitting the trails full on. It takes a few rides to get used to the disengaging. Try playing on a grassy field. As you get better you will pop out with very little thought. When riding and reengaging a foot, just put your foot on the pedal and let the foot find it's way into the cleat. Looking down and fumbling for the cleat while trying to ride can be frustrating . Enjoy and have fun.
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Old 02-01-08, 11:04 PM   #4
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I like crank brothers as well. They have quite a selection now and have been sturdy, reliable pedals for me. I run mallets on my mtb and candy c's on my road bike.
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Old 02-01-08, 11:06 PM   #5
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Old 02-02-08, 12:17 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zan View Post

Questions:

I'm looking to spend maybe 40 - 50$ per set of pedals. What are some pedal models you would recommend to me? Are there any "decent" pedals in that price range?

Are all clipless pedals the same in terms of fit? Do I need a certain style of cleats for a certain pedal, or is it all/mostly universal? Can I use the same set of shoes (and cleats) on different types of pedals/makes? Or would I need specific shoes/cleats for specific pedals?

Are clipless pedals generally the same, in terms of how they work? I mean: is the method the same for pretty much all the pedals? I'm curious if it'd be better to buy two sets of the same model for both bikes.

Anything else a noob should know about clipless pedals before he goes out and gets a set?

Thanks for the input!
http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/136...-%26-Save!.htm
2 sets for $105.00 regularly 220!
http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...1&category=115
http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...1&category=115
http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...7&category=115

Fit depends mostly on your shoe and cleat position on the sole. Yes you need cleats that are specific to your pedals. You can use one set of shoes with the same pedal model on both bikes or similar pedals that allow the same cleat (egg beaters?).

Clipless pedals are "generally" the same in principle, but not design. The method is the same but feels different in different pedals. I would recommend two sets of the same pedal.

You will fall. Hips and wrists mostly. Practice unclipping a lot before testing the limits, and unclip a little ahead of time at first (stop signs, inside foot on big dirt turns, etc). Find a shoe you like first and then try out different pedal types at you local bike shop.

Clipless are great. Good luck.
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Old 02-02-08, 09:53 AM   #7
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I recently was in your position and had used the toe clips for the last four years.

I did try the egg beaters but found them difficult to get out of quickly and went back to the toe clips.
In July of last year Shimano made a multi release cleat that allowed much easier release and I have now been using the 959's mentioned in this thread and I can honestly say these are the best for anyone starting to use clipless pedals.

The fact you can adjust the tension to suit your needs is great the egg beaters you cannot.

I feel much more confident and can easily release.
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Old 02-02-08, 10:19 AM   #8
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I understand that there is a learning curve with the pedals and that I should practice before I start doing anything serious with them.

What is the difference between a set of egg beaters and the "regular" clipless pedals, other than weight?

Can you use "regular" clipless pedals as platforms, ever, (let's say I got nervous)?

Thanks for the suggestions and advice so far. Really, though, I'd like the pedals' price to stay under 100$!
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Old 02-02-08, 11:15 AM   #9
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It's very hard to use clipless as a platform because, at least for me, the cleat will engage the pedal when you pushing down. There are pedals that have platforms on one side and clipless on the other (SPD type) but I'd recommend just getting used to them so that when you want to be clipped in, you're not trying to flip the pedal around to get the proper side up.

They really aren't hard to get into. If you're used to clips, it will take a bit to get used to the different motion of clipless, but it's a similar idea.
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