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Old 05-05-08, 06:22 PM   #1
Artik
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Confused

Hi guys,

I'm a newbie and I'm trying to figure out what bike to buy...
I think the very first step is to determine what can of bike I want and that's where the confusion is.

I know that hardtails are different from hybrids but I'm not sure when to chose one over the other one.

For example when should I buy
Trek 6000: http://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/B...6000&Type=bike
or the Rocky Mountain Soul:
http://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/B...Soul&Type=bike

and when would those two be a better choice:
Rocky Mountain Whistler 10: http://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/B...r+10&Type=bike
Gary Fisher Kaitai: http://www.fisherbikes.com/bike/model/kaitai/geometry

I will mostly ride in the city, on dirt roads, gravel path and the occasional grass
I want to be able to go for a 50-100km ride (30-60 miles) as well
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Old 05-05-08, 06:31 PM   #2
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So, with the wealth of information that you received at mtbr.com, you decided to come over here and start a thread to get the same answers? I understand wanting more input, but the information that you received over there was pretty spot on and you're not likely to get any better input here.
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Old 05-05-08, 07:24 PM   #3
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lol,

As I said over there I'm not sure if MTBR is only for mountain bike or more inclusive.

Also, here in Canada, the cycling season is almost gone
Soon the snow will be back and I'd like to know what to buy before the ski season.
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Old 05-05-08, 07:28 PM   #4
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Get a cyclocross bike. Hybrids are terrible compromises. Mountain bikes may prove to be too heavy and sluggish for city riding and would be a big pain for 100km on stock knobbies.

A cyclocross bike is a great way to ride the city and hit occasional gravel or dirt. Doing a metric century would be a lot easier.
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Old 05-05-08, 07:43 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by santiago View Post
Get a cyclocross bike. Hybrids are terrible compromises. Mountain bikes may prove to be too heavy and sluggish for city riding and would be a big pain for 100km on stock knobbies.

A cyclocross bike is a great way to ride the city and hit occasional gravel or dirt. Doing a metric century would be a lot easier.
Had he maintained a single thread, his budget would be clear, and a cyclocross is out of his range or at best a bare bones SS cyclox, but I doubt it. The thread in which he establishes his full need and budget is over at mtbr.com.
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Old 05-05-08, 08:06 PM   #6
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I think I like the upright position of a hardtail/hybrid

What makes a hybrid a terrible compromise?
On the paper they look interesting: It's light, it has big wheels and narrow tires (semi slick) and short travel suspension.
Of course in practice they may not be as good as they're in theory....
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Old 05-06-08, 04:58 AM   #7
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What makes a hybrid a terrible compromise?

On the paper they look interesting: It's light, it has big wheels and narrow tires (semi slick) and short travel suspension.
Honestly, hybrids are just terribly limited bikes that are really only good for casual bike path riding. With the right tires a hardtail MTB can perform as well as a hybrid on paths and streets, but you sure as heck can't take a hybrid in the woods. Also hybrids can't compare to even a basic road bike for speed and efficiency. Plus I absolutley hate the fact that they put a suspension fork on the things, worse than useless.

As has been stated before, a cylocross bike is the way to go and should actually do a decent job at evrything you described. If that's out of the question you may be able to find a very basic aluminum/steel fork road bike with 32 spoke wheels that can hold up to some rough backroad riding.
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