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Old 09-11-08, 02:13 PM   #1
JonnyV
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Need new tires...

Ok, I love the new Hi-Fi. It's a very comfortable ride, I'm extremely happy with it. I'm not happy with the tires though. I'm running Maxxis now, they seem to be great for regular trails without any downhills but as soon as I hit a steep downhill I can't seem to get enough bite. I end up with rear wheel locked up and the tire isn't grabbing anything and I go faster than I want to be going. This has caused a couple endoes already. I like the looks of the Velociraptor's rear wheel. Anyway this could help with my problem? It's also a lack of confidence/skill, I'm sure but any suggestions for a rear tire with lots of grab would be much appreciated.
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Old 09-12-08, 05:19 AM   #2
mic2377
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before new tires, check tire pressure.
50+ PSI - no traction and bouncing around
30 PSI - stuck to the trail like glue.
i thought i had the worst tires ever created until i started airing those babies down. the lower, the better, with the limit being pinch flatting.

also, make sure to lean back when descending. no tire will make up for bad technique. having weight too far forward while descending + hitting large obstacle = endo
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Old 09-12-08, 06:11 AM   #3
mtnbiker66
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What Maxxis tires are you runnung?
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Old 09-12-08, 02:02 PM   #4
JonnyV
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I'm glad you mentioned the air pressure. For whatever reason I had not thought of that and I think you might be right. As for which Maxxis tires...sadly I don't know. I grabbed them off the shelf at my LBS, no sticker on them and dirt cheap. Also no indication of model on the tire itself.
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Old 09-15-08, 06:27 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JonnyV View Post
... I'm running Maxxis now, they seem to be great for regular trails without any downhills but as soon as I hit a steep downhill I can't seem to get enough bite. I end up with rear wheel locked up and the tire isn't grabbing anything and I go faster than I want to be going. This has caused a couple endoes already.
It's got nothing to do with it. Your endos are caused by ...

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Originally Posted by JonnyV View Post
I like the looks of the Velociraptor's rear wheel. Anyway this could help with my problem? It's also a lack of confidence/skill, I'm sure but any suggestions for a rear tire with lots of grab would be much appreciated.
Jon
You nailed it. Going downhill, most of your weight is transferred to the front wheel. This makes the rear brake virtually useless. Sounds like you're getting panicked then locking up the front wheel which WILL cause an endo.

You need to modulate your speed using primarily the FRONT brake. On a shallow descent you should practice getting your weight behind the saddle and braking using ONLY THE FRONT BRAKE. Grab the saddle between your thighs or knees (or whatever it falls next to). Brace your weight behind the bars.

After you've practiced this for a while on progressively steeper descents, return to two wheeled braking. Remember to emphasize the front. If your on mechanical brakes, you may which to loosen up the rear to emphasize this. If you're on disc brakes, a larger rotor on the front then the rear will help.
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