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Old 03-14-04, 11:18 AM   #1
Jonny B
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Noob questions

I'm a roadie/BMXer, looking at buying an On-One Inbred SS. I've got most of the spec down, but I'm not sure about the fork and brakes.

I know smeg-all about suspension, and I don't really know what i need. I'll probably use this bike mostly for smooth-medium trails (around local forests and farmland) and bad-weather road riding (road bike doesn't have fenders y'see). I weight a fair bit, 250+ maybe, but I'm not going to push anything to any limits, I just wanna have fun getting muddy.

On-One has a deal on Fox Vanilla 125Rs, 100RLs and Float 100Rs (I think), and since money is an issue at the moment, I'm trying to get as cheap a fork as possible. The Vanilla 125R is 250 when bought with a frame, but I could probably stretch to 300.

What should I look for? Air or coil (which is better for what riding type?)? The frame is designed for 100mm travel (all three of the Foxes are adjustable), so no big 5 inchers OK? Disk ready of course, but what's the deal with mounts? I know about ISO, but doesn't Manitou have their own type? What's up with that?

Basically I want to know if the Vanilla 125R is any good, and if it's not, what is for similar money (about $400US).

As for brakes, I want a disk on the front and a V out back. I like Avid for some reason, their Mechanical disk in particular. But is it worth more money and potentially more hassle to go for juice? How easy is it to shorten lines, bleed systems etc (I like to do all my own wrenching)? As I say I'm not going to go crazy on this bike, power-wise I think hydros are more than enough. And again, what abut mounts? For the rear I was thinking Avid Single Digit 5s (and Speed Dial 5 levers, are these ok for disks?).

I appreciate any advice anyone can give me
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Old 03-14-04, 12:20 PM   #2
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For your weight I would go with coil. Feels better and most heavier riders prefer it.

I don't have first hand experience with the juicy, but a rider here complained a lot about the levers. But then again, the reason I haven't looked at them is because of how expensive they are compared to other systems.

BTW nice setup, gonna be strong
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Old 03-14-04, 01:21 PM   #3
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i'm not a mountain biker but my better half is. he picked up a set of judy's for about 300 quid and has raved about them sence. think they are designed for heavier riders and he's by no means a heavy rider. he did have to reajust the tensions in them for his weight when we first had them installed on his bike. (it's a downhill) but after he tighten things down he's been happy w/ them. they do require daily cleaning and oil before and after every ride. so if your not into maintainance look into something that has hydrolic covers.

hope you find something nice your happy w/

cheers
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Old 03-14-04, 01:23 PM   #4
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shoot i didn't take disk brakes into account on my post... forgive. judy's may not accept disk breaks... bugger i look the fool today hu... guess i should shut my mouth on bikes i know nothing about... my bad for trying to be helpfull.

cheers
kat
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Old 03-14-04, 01:35 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonny B
As for brakes, I want a disk on the front and a V out back. I like Avid for some reason, their Mechanical disk in particular. But is it worth more money and potentially more hassle to go for juice? How easy is it to shorten lines, bleed systems etc (I like to do all my own wrenching)? As I say I'm not going to go crazy on this bike, power-wise I think hydros are more than enough. And again, what abut mounts? For the rear I was thinking Avid Single Digit 5s (and Speed Dial 5 levers, are these ok for disks?).

I appreciate any advice anyone can give me
Don't have any experience of any Fox Forks, or rear suspension, but there are plenty of reviews on both these manufacturers in the magazines,probably to be found on actual bike reviews, so you should be able to glean information from these. Why Don't you want Disks front and rear? You talk of wanting to get Muddy, and I can assure you that Rim Brakes are not good for the wallet at your weight, especially on the back. Discs will be more effective, stay out of the crud better, and it is cheaper to replace a worn out disc, than a rim. If your budget can run to it, then definitely go hydraulic. No cable brake is as effective as a hydraulic.I have just recently set up Hope discs on a Tandem, and on this manufacturer, Hose shortening/ replacement could not be easier.

On the Fork Front, Fox are Good, so are Marzocchi, so are Rockshox, so are Manitou+ several others, but there are manufacturers and models within the good manufacturers, that could not be recommended. Depends on your wallet, but at your weight, opt for coil in stead of air.
You probably do not want any more than 100mm travel, but do look for availability of Stronger springs, once again for your weight. A standard fork will probably arrive with a soft to medium spring, and you will definitely need a firm to hard spring.

Keep coming back to your weight again, but you will need a certain strength within your wheels. Mainly on the rim, (Don't go for lightweight XC rims), but 36 spoke will add a bit more strength, with only a small weight penalty, and it will be worth getting a wheel builder to check your wheels over, tension spokes, and check true before many miles are put on the bike. I would also stay clear of black spokes, as these have a habit of being of inferior quality, but disguised.

Best thing you can do is to set up a budget, Go to a Good Mountain bike retailer, and discuss what is necessary. You may be overspeccing on your first ATB, or they may suggest something that you have not thought of.
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Old 03-14-04, 02:03 PM   #6
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The reason I don't want a rear disk (well I do actually but...) is because I already have a lovely Surly SS hub, that won't take a disk. But it's 32h and maybe 36h would be better. Oh this is going to get expensive

In that case, what 36h wheels are good, prebuilt or seperate hubs and rims (given all of the above, my weight, style, disks etc)?
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Old 03-14-04, 03:03 PM   #7
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Why do you want 36hole wheels. Are 32's not holding up under the weight. Unless you are destroying wheels I wouldn't worry to much about 36 holes.

As for rims, I use Ryno Lite XL 36 hole rims on one set I have. Seem strong enough If you want REALLY strong get the custom made by a good wheelbuilder. That is way more important than the actual parts themselves.
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Old 03-15-04, 08:22 AM   #8
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Heeeeerrrrrreeeeee's Johnny!

As mentioned, Fox makes a very good fork, stick with coil sprung vs air sprung. The reason being, an air fork will require you to pressurize it close to it's maximum setting in order to set the preload for your weight. Max Air Pressure + a little dirt + 250lb rider = blown suspension. Coil is KING (for us big guys anyways)! Also, as Stapfam said, figure on swapping out the stock springs immediately.

Regarding your brakes, Avid mechanicals are the best availble mech on the market and a good choice.

Wheels, I'm also running 32 spoke wheels w/o problems. I do however use 14 straight gage spokes. Good quality spokes as well, DT Swiss or Wheelsmith! I'm running RhinoLite XL's on my FR bike and Mavic D321 on my DJ bike. The Mavic's are heavier, but bombproof. I tacoed the front RhinoLite, but ANY wheel would've been toast with what I did! BIG ENDO!

I'd keep your Surly hub and lace it to more of a heavier duty FR type rim. Sun's Rhynolites are good, but I still prefer rims made by Mavic.

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Old 03-15-04, 03:05 PM   #9
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Is the Fox 125R coil? How easy is it to replace a spring? Could I do it at home with regular tools?
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Old 03-15-04, 03:08 PM   #10
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Usually, all you really do is remove the top cap, (socket wrench) and pull the spring out, and drop the new one in. Replace cap and that's it!

L8R
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