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  1. #1
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    Budget Light Weight Conversion...

    My current hard tail is heavy... Oh 30 some pounds I would guess. I've been thinking about cutting the fat, cheaply, with minimal spending.

    Current Ideas:
    1) Replace shock /w aluminum rigid (currently have a Rock Shock J1)
    2) Remove the front derailleur /w shifter
    3) Drop two chain rings / reduce chain length, depending on which rings I drop (wont save much weight, but I wont need such a long chain if I use a smaller chain ring)
    4) Get lighter tires when my current ones wear out.

    90% of my riding is on gravel / sandy trails, going up + down hills with a rock garden / wood pile here and there. So I will get a harsher ride, but the climbs should get easier, so I figure it will be a fair trade off. Any other suggestions?

  2. #2
    ed
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    "1) Replace shock /w aluminum rigid"
    Will slow you down everywhere except smooth ground. Bone up for a decent 3.5lb fork with a lockout for the climbs.

    "2) Remove the front derailleur /w shifter"
    What's a /w shifter? (I am all 'bout the 1x9 setup) Removing the front der., shifter, and rings could save you 1/2lb or so. In the grand scheme of things...that ain't spit.

    "3) Drop two chain rings / reduce chain length, depending on which rings I drop (wont save much weight, but I wont need such a long chain if I use a smaller chain ring)"
    Keep the middle.

    "4) Get lighter tires when my current ones wear out."
    Get some Kenda Nevegal 2.1" DTC's.


    The most noticeable weight savings will be a good/light wheelset and some decent meats.

    30lbs really isn't that bad unless you're a whiny-weight-weenie.

  3. #3
    Type 1 Racer rydaddy's Avatar
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    Sounds like a good SS conversion candidate.

    Edit: It might suck in loose terrain though.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by chelboed View Post
    30lbs really isn't that bad unless you're a whiny-weight-weenie.
    Lately I've been riding road on my 20lb bike, and it's amazing. I really want something similar to it, but in an off road fashion. The 1x9 is not so much so for weight savings, as it is for simplicity. I run down tube shifters on my roadie, and I love'em!

  5. #5
    Official Website Waterboy born2bahick's Avatar
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    What weight are you shooting for? Know that a 20 lb bike off road is a little different than on road.

  6. #6
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    20lb road bike is roughly equivalent to a 30lb mountain bike ratio-wise. But get a new fork, technology will be better and lighter. Or just new tires.

  7. #7
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    My bike is around 30 pounds, and it seems fine to me. . .
    “Speed has never killed anyone, suddenly becoming stationary... that’s what gets you.”- Jeremy Clarkson

  8. #8
    Generic Title ProFail's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by theextremist04 View Post
    20lb road bike is roughly equivalent to a 30lb mountain bike ratio-wise. But get a new fork, technology will be better and lighter. Or just new tires.
    Price wise....

    A $1,400 road bike will weigh around 18-19 pounds. My ($2,100) MTB weighs a tad over 30.


    EDIT- Oops. My MTB is FS. S'pose you're right.
    Generic Joke

  9. #9
    ****** (can I say this?)
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    ^^^^^^^
    What kind?
    “Speed has never killed anyone, suddenly becoming stationary... that’s what gets you.”- Jeremy Clarkson

  10. #10
    ed
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    Quote Originally Posted by ProFail View Post
    Price wise....

    A $1,400 road bike will weigh around 18-19 pounds. My ($2,100) MTB weighs a tad over 30.


    EDIT- Oops. My MTB is FS. S'pose you're right.
    Yeah, but I've built a 1k mtb in the 26lb range. That's not a great comparison. The Stumpy hardtail that was like $1100-$1300 a few yrs ago was 24-25lbs.

  11. #11
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    Couple things you could do is get a nicer wheelset, light xc fork, throw on a carbon handlebar (Performance Bike has a carbon riser that's cheap and good)

    http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...slisearch=true

    Get some Maxxis Crossmarks.

    This would be done is steps of course, but the fork and wheels with tires are key to losing weight.

  12. #12
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    That's the thing... A rigid fork is 2lbs or less... Cheap too. I just don't know how bad the ride will be.

  13. #13
    Generic Title ProFail's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chelboed View Post
    Yeah, but I've built a 1k mtb in the 26lb range. That's not a great comparison. The Stumpy hardtail that was like $1100-$1300 a few yrs ago was 24-25lbs.
    I know. I have a full susser. Of course hardtails will be lighter, which I realized in my OP.
    Generic Joke

  14. #14
    BAM! theextremist04's Avatar
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    Yeah, my $2400 road bike is 17ish lb and my $3100 mtb is 25lb, albeit FS. So pretty close.

  15. #15
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    I have two bikes right now, one is being sold. My Ti hardtail weighs 18.7 lbs. It is 24 speed, has a SID WorldCup fork, 160mm Hope disc brakes, and there is nothing trimmed to reduce weight. It is intrinsically light. A 2.8 lb frame, 1600gm wheelset, 570gm crankset, add up to that. My Yeti AS-R Carbon is 24 lbs, and is also fully rigged. 30 lbs seems like a tough weight to build to. I am imagining a steel BB spindle, steel axles, a steel steerer tube on the fork, and a lot of Aluminum where carbon could be used fairly inexpensively. Seatpost, bars, crankarms, that sort of stuff. Ti could be a good alternative for your BB, cassette, and any other weighty items. It is far less expensive to get a really good seatpost and handlebar than say a cassette, since you will have the bars and post for a long time. They don't typically "wear out". As for stuff that does wear, just wait until it does, and get something lighter (preferably stronger also, like if you have a SRAM 790 cassette and want a new one, get an XTR, they weigh almost literally half as much).

  16. #16
    ed
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    The rigid fork is a nice idea for a second bike, but it really gets old when you have to "white knuckle" a moderately rough section of trail that you could normally just blow through. It's more work for sure. I have a rigid beater that won't give up the ghost. I take it out now and then when the weather is crap. It's fun and challenging but I wouldn't give up my suspended front end fo'nuttin.

  17. #17
    ed
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Crawford View Post
    I have two bikes right now, one is being sold. My Ti hardtail weighs 18.7 lbs. It is 24 speed, has a SID WorldCup fork, 160mm Hope disc brakes, and there is nothing trimmed to reduce weight. It is intrinsically light. A 2.8 lb frame, 1600gm wheelset, 570gm crankset, add up to that. My Yeti AS-R Carbon is 24 lbs, and is also fully rigged. 30 lbs seems like a tough weight to build to. I am imagining a steel BB spindle, steel axles, a steel steerer tube on the fork, and a lot of Aluminum where carbon could be used fairly inexpensively. Seatpost, bars, crankarms, that sort of stuff. Ti could be a good alternative for your BB, cassette, and any other weighty items. It is far less expensive to get a really good seatpost and handlebar than say a cassette, since you will have the bars and post for a long time. They don't typically "wear out". As for stuff that does wear, just wait until it does, and get something lighter (preferably stronger also, like if you have a SRAM 790 cassette and want a new one, get an XTR, they weigh almost literally half as much).
    Carbon this, ti that...(yawn)...all I hear is that Charlie Brown "adult trumpet" blowing with a little of SNAP, CRACKLE, failure. I've sworn off anything breakable, hahaha.

  18. #18
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    Unless you're racing it get used to it... it will be good excersise.

    My bike is bout 50pounds AFAIK (I'm pretty such it was 23kg when I weighed it). Can't wait till I get my new 20pound cyclocross bike and start whizzing around on that. Should feel awsome.

  19. #19
    ed
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    I can understand people who wanna drop some weight on their bikes. I used to be a gram shaving weight weenie with a roadie mindset...lusting after ti and carbon. If you're a lightweight or just not hard on parts...what the heck, may as well do it. For myself...I couldn't even do a 26lb hardtail w/o technical issues, so I'm back to 30.

    I could have prob. done a 26lb build with a Banshee Viento frame and an air sprung 120mm fork I guess, but then I'd be limited to a tamer riding style. Now I can be a hack and get away with it.

  20. #20
    Should be riding Bike Lover's Avatar
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    I have a Redline Monocog Flight, steel front fork. It's okay around here. The only thing is it can get quite rough when you're going fast and there are repeated bumps right in a row. That's when I feel it the most and it's a 29er. Other than that, it's not bad.

    I haven't ridden an Al, so someone else can chime in here, but typically Al, isn't as forgiving. If you really want to lighten up the front, get a CF fork. It should offer a bit better attenuation of some chatter than the Al. Of course, light wheels and tires are usually a quick way to save weight too, depending on what you're ridding now.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by chelboed View Post
    I can understand people who wanna drop some weight on their bikes. I used to be a gram shaving weight weenie with a roadie mindset...lusting after ti and carbon. If you're a lightweight or just not hard on parts...what the heck, may as well do it. For myself...I couldn't even do a 26lb hardtail w/o technical issues, so I'm back to 30.

    I could have prob. done a 26lb build with a Banshee Viento frame and an air sprung 120mm fork I guess, but then I'd be limited to a tamer riding style. Now I can be a hack and get away with it.
    That's kinda why I asked him what he was shooting for. You know, I've got a lightweight hardtail. You also know I don't hit the trails too regularly on it. I find it too light, and it's a heck of a workout just too keep it under me in the rock gardens of Perry. I much prefer the 24 pound hardtail range for myself.

  22. #22
    Whistler-bound dminor's Avatar
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    I think I'd work on the engine first and then see if 30 lbs. is still a burden.

  23. #23
    Fourth Degree Legend junkyard's Avatar
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    You are all idiots. You missed two obvious points here: budget and lose weight. The answer is simple. Stop buying food.
    Quote Originally Posted by dminor View Post
    The caveat with a strap-on, of course, is you will have to get creative with a couple of lock cables and an anchor point

  24. #24
    Type 1 Racer rydaddy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by junkyard View Post
    You missed two obvious points here: budget and lose weight
    Which is why I say go SS. You can't lose weight any cheaper.

  25. #25
    Fourth Degree Legend junkyard's Avatar
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    My method saves money.
    Quote Originally Posted by dminor View Post
    The caveat with a strap-on, of course, is you will have to get creative with a couple of lock cables and an anchor point

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