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Old 12-03-08, 05:14 PM   #1
mtbtrek
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Chain and Cassette Help!

i just got a new chain and i started riding it and every gear skips. the cassettes arent worn down. could the chain be too long or does the derailleur need to be tuned. thanks for any help.
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Old 12-03-08, 05:24 PM   #2
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The cassette and/or chainrings are more worn out than you think they are.
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Old 12-03-08, 05:54 PM   #3
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+1. I recently tried replacing my chain without changing the cassette and mine ended up skipping too. If it works, it works...if it doesn't, replace the cassette.
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Old 12-03-08, 06:56 PM   #4
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Chain could definitely be too long. Use Sheldon's method for chain length if you haven't already and you should be fine. If the problem persists, it could be the derailleur/hanger or the casette.

"The best technique for setting chain length is to thread the chain onto the large/large combination, without running it through the rear derailer. Mesh the two ends on to the large chainwheel so that they could be connected (outer link meets inner link), then make the chain one complete link (one inch) longer than that. In almost all cases, this will give the optimum length."

http://sheldonbrown.com/derailer-adjustment.html#chain
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Old 12-03-08, 09:52 PM   #5
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Replace the cassette first. If that doesn't fix it you'll need to replace a chainring/ crankset depending on if they're modular or not. Also, invest in a chain wear tool. I bought one for ~7 bucks I think. It gives a pretty good indication of when your chain is stretched out too far, and will hopefully prevent having to replace the whole drivetrain again.
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Old 12-03-08, 10:16 PM   #6
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The bane of a chain-checker is that you will replace your chain when it get's to 0.7"...and now you have a slightly worn out cassette and rings. The next chain will wear out sooner, followed by the next which will come even faster.

I used to do the chain-checker method. I ended up replacing 1 chain per month, 1 cassette every 3 chains, chainrings every two cassettes. Basically:

12 chains per year
4 cassettes per year
2 sets of rings

This started to cost a buttload!!!


Now, I just replace a chain when it breaks or when it starts to skip. Instead of spending several hundred per year...it's down to approx $100 or so. (give or take) I pretty-much end up replacing my rings, cassette, and chain 1x per year.
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Old 12-04-08, 10:40 AM   #7
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I'm from the same school of thought as Ed. Back in my MX days we only replaced chains and sprockets when needed, and they were replaced all together. Of course smooth shifting didn't suffer like it does on a bike. However as Ed mentioned you can go the "Replace my chain every few months and try to save the cassette and rings" approach, or you can do the " ride it till it shifts poorly and replace everything" approach. In the end I found the cost about the same for both schools of thought.
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Old 12-04-08, 10:49 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chelboed View Post
The bane of a chain-checker is that you will replace your chain when it get's to 0.7"...and now you have a slightly worn out cassette and rings. The next chain will wear out sooner, followed by the next which will come even faster.

I used to do the chain-checker method. I ended up replacing 1 chain per month, 1 cassette every 3 chains, chainrings every two cassettes. Basically:

12 chains per year
4 cassettes per year
2 sets of rings

This started to cost a buttload!!!


Now, I just replace a chain when it breaks or when it starts to skip. Instead of spending several hundred per year...it's down to approx $100 or so. (give or take) I pretty-much end up replacing my rings, cassette, and chain 1x per year.
To put this in perspective, how many miles/year do you ride?
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Old 12-04-08, 10:56 AM   #9
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Ed only rides 5 gnarmiles a week, but .3 miles of that is drop to flats.
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Old 12-04-08, 11:14 AM   #10
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is it a 10 speed chain on 8 speeds cogs, or vice versa ?
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Old 12-04-08, 11:58 AM   #11
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Ed only rides 5 gnarmiles a week, but .3 miles of that is drop to flats.
For those of you unfamiliar with a gnarmile, it is approximately 80.567 nautical miles.
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Old 12-04-08, 12:43 PM   #12
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Not to be an ass, but is your derailer dialed in good? That is where most of the shifting issue comes from and can be one of the last things people look at.

If that is good. Then maybe you do need a new cassette. I would so for the cheapest Sram one they have. I have been running it for almost a year and is still holding up strong.
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Old 12-04-08, 10:56 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chelboed View Post
The bane of a chain-checker is that you will replace your chain when it get's to 0.7"...and now you have a slightly worn out cassette and rings. The next chain will wear out sooner, followed by the next which will come even faster.

I used to do the chain-checker method. I ended up replacing 1 chain per month, 1 cassette every 3 chains, chainrings every two cassettes. Basically:

12 chains per year
4 cassettes per year
2 sets of rings

This started to cost a buttload!!!


Now, I just replace a chain when it breaks or when it starts to skip. Instead of spending several hundred per year...it's down to approx $100 or so. (give or take) I pretty-much end up replacing my rings, cassette, and chain 1x per year.

i assume that was with a chain wear idicator not a chain checker since you said about 7 bucks, the chain checker actually measures the stretch with numbers instead of just being like oh if fits in youre past .7% that way you can replace a hair before you get to .7, although rider weight and how hard you pedal ect also matter, 200+lbs of muscle sprinting up hills is gonna put more load wear even befor the .7 mark than someone who is 115lbs and runs a chain a tad past .7 or even to .8 (i've seen the very rare past 1% and cassette is fine)

also bike shops have a tool to check cassette wear, its not foolproof so it can be hard to tell if you on the line, but they might be able to tell you if thats a problem or not before you start just replaceing parts
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Old 12-05-08, 07:21 AM   #14
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i went to my lbs and got a new cassette and the problem is gone. thanks for the help
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