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View Poll Results: Ramp or Log over.

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  • Ramp/jump

    7 41.18%
  • Log over

    10 58.82%
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  1. #1
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    Log overs VS. Ramps

    Hey, I was just wondering, if you had your choice, would you prefer getting over a log by means of sticks/smaller logs built up to make a log over type thing, or a ramp/jump off of the log?
    “Speed has never killed anyone, suddenly becoming stationary... that’s what gets you.”- Jeremy Clarkson

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    Senior Member z415's Avatar
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    Depends on how much speed I can get based on the trail. I personally would not want to see a ramp, want to jump off of it, and really have to accelerate to do so.
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    ٩๏̯͡๏)۶ Luke52's Avatar
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    I would prefer a ramp.

    Was riding the other day and I seem to have a fair bit of difficulty with log overs for some reason..

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    Arsehole PlatyPius's Avatar
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    Neither.

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    What? Just clear the log off the trail? Seems like a waste.
    “Speed has never killed anyone, suddenly becoming stationary... that’s what gets you.”- Jeremy Clarkson

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    Senior Member rankin116's Avatar
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    How about riding over the log w/o a ramp? Are we talking redwood size tree trunk?

  7. #7
    Zan
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    if you are traveling with a lot of speed before the obstacle, a ramp. i don't want to touch my brakes. ramps are hokey, though, if you're going slow.
    -- Zan

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    Quote Originally Posted by ca7erham View Post
    What? Just clear the log off the trail? Seems like a waste.
    I think what the Pus was saying was that unless it's like 3' in diameter...just go over the thing.

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    Te mortuo heres tibi sim? scrublover's Avatar
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    depends on the flow of the trail. sometimes a ramp doesn't work well if in a spot where you can't get the right speed. case in point: we have a lot of logs around here that you have to clean in the middle of a climb - a ramp to jump is kinda' useless there.

    IMO, if the trail/log gives you enough room to do so, you can do both.

    or, you can learn to j or bunny hop over some of them. start small and work your way up.

    this all dovetails nicely with the post a couple days earlier about getting over logs.
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    Quote Originally Posted by chelboed View Post
    I think what the Pus was saying was that unless it's like 3' in diameter...just go over the thing.
    Oh, I understand. I was thinking like BIG log, like a 50 year old tree that got destroyed in a wind storm.
    “Speed has never killed anyone, suddenly becoming stationary... that’s what gets you.”- Jeremy Clarkson

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    Quote Originally Posted by scrublover View Post
    depends on the flow of the trail. sometimes a ramp doesn't work well if in a spot where you can't get the right speed. case in point: we have a lot of logs around here that you have to clean in the middle of a climb - a ramp to jump is kinda' useless there.

    IMO, if the trail/log gives you enough room to do so, you can do both.

    or, you can learn to j or bunny hop over some of them. start small and work your way up.

    this all dovetails nicely with the post a couple days earlier about getting over logs.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NnMmi...ead.php?t=1789

    Like that? I tried that once only with a slightly larger log. Worked Ok, but it would have been better with practice.
    “Speed has never killed anyone, suddenly becoming stationary... that’s what gets you.”- Jeremy Clarkson

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    Arsehole PlatyPius's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chelboed View Post
    I think what the Pus was saying was that unless it's like 3' in diameter...just go over the thing.
    Yup. If I can bunny-hop it, I will. If I can grind over it, I will.

    Also, I'm "old-school" (godz, I hate that term.) Mtn bikes used to have shoulder pads on the frame for extended carrying. I'm perfectly fine with dismounting, climbing over the tree, getting back on, and continuing on my way. I'm riding in the woods to get away from the noise, rush, etc of daily life. I can do a 'cross-style clear of the object in very little time; but longer than jumping it via a ramp, I suppose. Why build something?

    If something must be built though, go for the stacked logs/branches thing. It's all about using natural stuff gathered from the area.

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    Arsehole PlatyPius's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scrublover View Post
    depends on the flow of the trail. sometimes a ramp doesn't work well if in a spot where you can't get the right speed. case in point: we have a lot of logs around here that you have to clean in the middle of a climb - a ramp to jump is kinda' useless there.

    IMO, if the trail/log gives you enough room to do so, you can do both.

    or, you can learn to j or bunny hop over some of them
    . start small and work your way up.

    this all dovetails nicely with the post a couple days earlier about getting over logs.

    I know I'm all old and crap, but does anyone else think that as FS bikes have become the standard, that MTB handling skills in general have gone downhill? (no pun intended)

    Platy :: still kicking it on a 2000 Rocky Mountain hardtail

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    I'm still rocking an HT (but I would be riding an FS if I could afford one). For me, I love built up stunts and all, but I totally understand what you are getting at.
    “Speed has never killed anyone, suddenly becoming stationary... that’s what gets you.”- Jeremy Clarkson

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    Arsehole PlatyPius's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ca7erham View Post
    I'm still rocking an HT (but I would be riding an FS if I could afford one). For me, I love built up stunts and all, but I totally understand what you are getting at.
    I think "stunts" and such have their place. Town Run trail in Indy, for instance, has both - normal trails AND elevated trails with seesaws, jumps, and such. That's the key - offering both so that people don't get scared off.

    Still, for having all of that skill for stuff like jumps (using ramps), seesaws, and such, lots of riders I've seen lack basic skills.

    For instance:
    Can you bunny hop a 1.5 foot log using platform pedals?

    You'd be amazed at the number of people who can't.

    Avoiding or going "light" over obstacles seems to be a lost art, too. We get what seems like hundreds of wheels brought into the shop for repair that have obviously been slammed into everything the trail had to offer.

    It makes me sad, really.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PlatyPius View Post
    For instance:
    Can you bunny hop a 1.5 foot log using platform pedals?
    Bunny hop, no. Get over, yes. Also, I know what you mean, as I used to ride a full rigid. But I can go way faster on my HT.
    “Speed has never killed anyone, suddenly becoming stationary... that’s what gets you.”- Jeremy Clarkson

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by PlatyPius View Post
    I know I'm all old and crap, but does anyone else think that as FS bikes have become the standard, that MTB handling skills in general have gone downhill? (no pun intended)
    No. On my FS bikes, I ride faster and more aggressively than I can on my HT. My handling skills haven't gone downhill, they've changed. It's all about progression. I don't have to pick micro-lines like I used to when riding my old rigid MTB (or even on the HT), now I can focus on macro-lines and go MUCH faster.

    Overall, current riding styles are different than when rigid or HTs were the norm.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by PlatyPius View Post
    I think "stunts" and such have their place. Town Run trail in Indy, for instance, has both - normal trails AND elevated trails with seesaws, jumps, and such. That's the key - offering both so that people don't get scared off.

    Still, for having all of that skill for stuff like jumps (using ramps), seesaws, and such, lots of riders I've seen lack basic skills.

    For instance:
    Can you bunny hop a 1.5 foot log using platform pedals?

    You'd be amazed at the number of people who can't.

    Avoiding or going "light" over obstacles seems to be a lost art, too. We get what seems like hundreds of wheels brought into the shop for repair that have obviously been slammed into everything the trail had to offer.

    It makes me sad, really.
    Easily can bunny hop a 1.5 foot log.

    Can't progress without crashing/ damaging equipment. Got to learn from mistakes.

    Coming from the northeast, I've come used to rocks and roots and riding on them is second nature. There are sections where the only way through that section is over alot of rough terrain. Those times it's just easier to loosen up on the bike and let the bike go it's own way.

    Logs as others have said depends on the flow of the trail and the general placement of the downed tree. If it's a downhill type of course where jump could be a benefit, a ramp will likely get built up. If it's a normal trail it's a log crossing with peices of limb making the up and down slope. In the case the log isn't that big, just leave as is. With the case of it would really mess up the flow of the trail, assuming it's a fast, smooth and very flowy section trail where it went down, it may just be beneficial to clear most of the downed tree from the trail and leave a bit of it and build a crossing/ramp over it for those that would like to use it.

    All I'm using for a mtb is a little 4130 slalom hardtail and I feel faster on it than I did when I had the fisher.
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  19. #19
    In search of moar cowbell dminor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PlatyPius View Post
    I know I'm all old and crap, but does anyone else think that as FS bikes have become the standard, that MTB handling skills in general have gone downhill? (no pun intended)
    What rock have you been living under? Full suspension has allowed me to push limits I might not have dreamed of otherwise. In fact, if I hadn't got hooked on FS, I'd probably just be riding dirt bikes instead. Bicycles became interesting (to me anyway) when they sprouted legs. (BTW, I'm OLD)

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    Quote Originally Posted by PlatyPius View Post
    The Freds' Mtn bikes used to have shoulder pads on the frame for extended carrying.
    Fixed!

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    Quote Originally Posted by never View Post
    No. On my FS bikes, I ride faster and more aggressively than I can on my HT. My handling skills haven't gone downhill, they've changed. It's all about progression. I don't have to pick micro-lines like I used to when riding my old rigid MTB (or even on the HT), now I can focus on macro-lines and go MUCH faster.

    Overall, current riding styles are different than when rigid or HTs were the norm.
    I'm talking about riders who are just now starting, and are starting with a FS bike. ie: those who never acquired the skills that a HT requires. I've been riding road a lot more now (no trails near me), and I'm seeing some of these people coming into the Road World (tm) [lol] as well and they have NO bike handling skills. They just ride over everything. Fine on a FS, not so fine on a road bike.

  22. #22
    In search of moar cowbell dminor's Avatar
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    ^^

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    While there is some merit to the hardtail thing, it's mostly myth. Only thing the hardtail provides now is forcing you to eye better lines.
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  24. #24
    In search of moar cowbell dminor's Avatar
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    Oh, and a deadfall is a deadfall; nothing mystic or sacred about it.


  25. #25
    Arsehole PlatyPius's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dminor View Post
    Oh, and a deadfall is a deadfall; nothing mystic or sacred about it.

    Okay. I see what kind of rider you are now. The sort who got all of our local trails closed.

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