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Old 03-21-09, 03:47 PM   #1
Britishbane
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1999 Specialized Rockhopper-how to proceed, frame worth keeping?

Hi all, after a hiatus I'm interested in getting back into cycling. I've got a '99 Rockhopper that has fallen into a state of disrepair. From what I've read the frame is solid and might be worth building around. So should I keep the bike? The bike has cheap components that I'd have to upgrade over time starting with pedals, a rear wheel thats untrue, and stem (for a longer reach).Or should I start afresh?

I used the search function, hope I'm not repeating.
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Old 03-21-09, 04:57 PM   #2
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first off if you need a new stem for longer reach you need to think about that, how long is the current stem, and how long of a stem do you need. If you need a way long stem than the bike is the wrong size, get a new one.

next what kinda riding do you wanna do, if you wanna get into real mtn biking you will prolly find compatability issues with the stuff you want.

if you think your gonna make a 99 rockhopper into a remotely competative or "good" bike think again. But if all you want is somthin to ride around on fun exersize ect nothin serious than ok you could make the bike work

Price is another thing to consider, don't throw hundreds of dollars into an old bike like that, you can get a allright new bike for around $600 (give or take depending on your standards)
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Old 03-21-09, 05:39 PM   #3
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Well the frame is 21'', so its pretty much impossible to get a bigger bike (unless I go custom). So I figured a riser bar and longer/more angular stem would help reach. What has changed in 7 years frame wise that makes salvaging my frame not worthwhile? What do you mean by compatibility issues?

I'm pretty serious about riding this thing "for real". Thanks for the response and sorry for more questions.
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Old 03-21-09, 05:52 PM   #4
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Hardtail technology has not evolved drastically over the last 10 years, your frame should be fine, however components have come a long way, and that is where it may be cheaper to buy a new bike than upgrade everything on yours. The bike was made to be a serious bike, but upgrading it is something you would want to consider and compatibility might be an issue.
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Old 03-21-09, 06:04 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by Britishbane View Post
Hi all, after a hiatus I'm interested in getting back into cycling. I've got a '99 Rockhopper that has fallen into a state of disrepair. From what I've read the frame is solid and might be worth building around. So should I keep the bike? The bike has cheap components that I'd have to upgrade over time starting with pedals, a rear wheel thats untrue, and stem (for a longer reach).Or should I start afresh?

I used the search function, hope I'm not repeating.
You'd be surprised at how much of a difference a good tune up or rebuild can help an older bike. New cables/casing and brake pads go a long way. Clean or replace the chain while you're at it. You might be surprised at how far a $100 worth of parts can get you. Good luck
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Old 03-21-09, 08:18 PM   #6
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I know mines sort of a different case, but it's an '82 shogun, and it works great. I put SRAM x9 components on it, it still needs brakes and a bottom bracket. basically, either way you choose to go have fun with it.
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Old 03-21-09, 08:35 PM   #7
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Do you need longer reach or shorter? The riser bar and shorter stem would get you shorter reach, the opposite would increase it.


If you're not looking to spend much, it could be a really good build up. A few properly working components can do a huge amount to almost any frame.... that being said, don't expect to be able to rely on a lot of the old components to save cost unless you've really checked them out.

If you're going to start playing around with mountain biking (again?), it would be worthwhile to build up. If you are intending on competing or picking up where you left off (and did DH or all mountain before), seriously consider just getting a new bike.


I wouldn't go as far as to put really nice hardware like X.9s on it (though it wasn't really suggested), but replacements a bit higher than the quality of the original components could be affordable. I enjoy the upgrade and shopping that goes in before the ride, so for me rebuilding the bike would be worthwhile. From bikepedia, it seems like a lot of the components were decent ones, so replacing damaged/nonfunctional components could do a lot for your riding experience. That being said things like V-Brakes could significantly hinder your riding if you intend to do DH. Also says they made a 23" version

http://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/B...8847&Type=bike
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Old 03-22-09, 01:14 PM   #8
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Thanks for the link DaJMasta. If it makes a difference I have the A1 Aluminum frame.
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Old 03-24-09, 07:28 PM   #9
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my .02

Your choice 1) 2009 rockhopper base $550-600 = mediocre bike
2) 2009 rockhopper expert $ 1300 = Sweet ride
3) Hit ebay for ~~~~FOX fork @ $300-400 + DR's & shifter's $65-125 + misc. parts $ 0-100
= rugggid ride.

I would go with, hmmm tough choice.... One nice thing about a rebuild is you can spend a little here and there vs. dropin tha bomb on a new machine that you'll be scared to scratch.

However, I found a hardrock comp on CL for $50 bux, and I'm gonna ride it like I stole~it.





she'll make a good dirt jumpa

Last edited by Lets_roll; 03-24-09 at 07:39 PM.
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Old 03-30-09, 07:53 PM   #10
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my .02

she'll make a good dirt jumpa
...once you get that bag off the back tire. : ]
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Old 03-31-09, 11:58 AM   #11
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...once you get that bag off the back tire. : ]
yea, that poj. It came that way. Prolly the best deal I have found yet.
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Old 03-31-09, 02:13 PM   #12
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OP-

What type of riding are you looking at doing? If you want a solid cross-country bike, your existing Rockhopper may suit you very well.

I picked up a rigid 1988 (that's right, I said '88) Cannondale for $50 when I first started mountain biking a couple of years ago. My friends are all astounded that I can keep up with their FS and hardtail bikes on cross-country trail rides. Don't buy in to the lie that you have to have a new bike to have fun on the trails.

Granted I have had to do some maintenance (new BB, replace rear wheel bearings, new headset bearings), but I have enjoyed learning to do those things myself.

Good luck with your rebuild.
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Old 04-06-09, 03:25 AM   #13
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lightning, thanks for the reply. I'm not going to be racing or anything, I just want to have fun. At this point in time I have no interest in FS. I'm pretty sure I'm going to just revamp the old frame and see how much of the repair work I can do myself.
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Old 04-06-09, 06:18 AM   #14
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I did similar, picked up a 1996 rokhopper on CL and am riding it to work now. Its my learning/everyday beater bike, old enough that I don't worry about scratching it, if I screw something up learning how to maintain it probably needed replaced anyway.
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Old 04-06-09, 11:30 AM   #15
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[QUOTE=Lets_roll;8636052] It came that way. /QUOTE]

...wow. does the bag have a hole in it from where the tire was rubbing it?
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Old 05-03-09, 05:54 PM   #16
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I'm doing something similar with my old bike... 1999 Gary Fisher Kaitai

The geometry on the bike fits me like a glove for the past 10 years & not much has changed with hardtails either.

But lately my riding style has finally worn out my components.

I already have a Manitou fork that I thought was good, but just OK, and an XT front deraileur

So I'm changing to an SLX crankset, X9 shifters, X9 rear deraileur, SRAM cassette, XTR chain, AVID single digit 7 brakes.

Then I'm gonna clean up the rest with new stem, riser bar, and seatpost & get rid of the computer.

Should be a pretty sweet XC hardtail when I'm done.

Last edited by wildpanda86; 05-03-09 at 06:20 PM. Reason: forgot to add the rest
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Old 05-05-09, 10:37 AM   #17
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I have a 1997 Trek 850 that I've owned since new.
I've upgraded and replaced just about every part on it, and I've never had "compatibility issues". It's not the lightest bike on the trail, but it's solid and fits me perfectly.

I currently have XT components, which seem to work fine and were much cheaper than buying a new XT equipped bike. The biggest cost in terms of upgrading will be the suspension fork. I upgraded mine in 2000, but it is now tired and worn from years of trail riding and needs to be replaced again. New forks are expensive and I'm not sure if I should invest the money or move on to a new bike.

A rigid fork may work fine and the bike would still be great for paved or light off-road riding.

Just because it's old doesn't automatically make it worthless.
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Old 05-05-09, 11:43 AM   #18
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You could get a new bike upgrade that bike put old parts from new bike as u upgrade on old bike eventualy have 1 nice newer bike and old ridable bike. just a thought
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