Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Mountain Biking Mountain biking is one of the fastest growing sports in the world. Check out this forum to discuss the latest tips, tricks, gear and equipment in the world of mountain biking.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 05-14-09, 02:02 PM   #1
DaBOB
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
DaBOB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Everywhere...
Bikes: Cannondale Bad Boy Disc, Cannondale Gemini 1000 (my swing arm cracked so let me know if you have one)
Posts: 16
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
one or two chainrings, that is the question.

I've got an old '02 Cannondale Gemini 1000. It needs a bit of work, as I've been sort of ignoring it for a while. I am planning on getting a new set of chainrings, rear cogs, and a chain. Right now I've got three chain rings in front and I was considering the idea of going down to two and installing a bash guard. I've played around with riding on giant rocks in the past and managed to bash up my chainring quite well in the process. I also like to do a bit of downhill (nothing to fancy but I like to go fast) and some freeride. I just thought I'd get all your opinions on this. Does the loss of the third chainring limit your speed too much (I would assume I'd want to keep my low gears). Is it possible to get a bash guard over a third chainring? What else should I consider?

Thanks
DaBOB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-09, 02:09 PM   #2
dminor 
Moar cowbell
 
dminor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: The 509
Bikes: are awesome.
Posts: 12,427
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Yes, you can still get large bash rings that bolt to the outside of your big ring to keep all three. But, really, you won't miss your big ring; replace it with a good poly bash guard.

If you stick to a 32 middle, though, you may find times where you spin out prematurely. This is not so much an issue plunking around on trail rides; but when you start doing more downhill-ish runs at speed, you will find the 32 does not quite cut it.

Easiest solution is to go to a 36t. Remember to get the appropriate-size bash guard for the little-bit-bigger ring.
__________________

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Twain
"Don't argue with stupid people; they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience."
dminor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-09, 02:16 PM   #3
pOrk
1GEAR
 
pOrk's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Milwaukee, Wi
Bikes: 20" DBI, Trek 69er, Kona Caldera, 26" Goose DJ
Posts: 135
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Shouldnt need more then 1 gear, sally
pOrk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-09, 10:57 PM   #4
sirtigersalot
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 624
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
the gemini is a pretty heavy bike, idk about the 02 model but later models had up to 7" of travel and weighed over 40lbs, so unless this is gonna be a dedicated freeride/dh bike i'd keep your granny gear, haulin that heavy bike up a hill with nothin but a 36t up front wouldn't be much fun
sirtigersalot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-09, 11:03 PM   #5
BenLi
Hardrocker
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 1,569
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer the slings and arrows of bad gear ratios, or by opposing, add more chainrings.
BenLi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-09, 11:52 PM   #6
DaBOB
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
DaBOB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Everywhere...
Bikes: Cannondale Bad Boy Disc, Cannondale Gemini 1000 (my swing arm cracked so let me know if you have one)
Posts: 16
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Bad gear ratios? Two front chainrings wouldn't be so bad would they? I assume I would have to get some sort of new bottom bracket or something to line up the front rings with the rear cogs . Is a "36t" the only chainring you can get in that 32 to 44 range?

What do y'all think about chain tensioners? I was thinking about installing one during this process as well.

P.S.
Forgive me, I'm not very good at Shakespeare just yet.

Last edited by DaBOB; 05-15-09 at 11:56 PM.
DaBOB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-09, 03:03 PM   #7
dminor 
Moar cowbell
 
dminor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: The 509
Bikes: are awesome.
Posts: 12,427
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
You can choose 34t, 36t or 38t (the most common). I said 36 because that usually satisfies most top-gear needs. I am running a 38t on my downhill bike but, especially paired with an 11-26 cassette, it is less trail-riding-friendly than I would like on a day-to-day basis.

For chain tensioners/guides, there are many more choices out there now for two-ring-shiftable guides than there were even 5 years ago.
__________________

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Twain
"Don't argue with stupid people; they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience."
dminor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-09, 06:28 PM   #8
ca7erham
****** (can I say this?)
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: CO
Bikes:
Posts: 1,900
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
There is a bash guard for 3 ring setups, which I've got and use (I would have preferred to just loose my big ring, but I have ridden a good number of places where I appreciated it, like jeep and fire roads out west), but with that bike, I'd just loose the big ring.
ca7erham is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:49 AM.