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Mountain Biking Mountain biking is one of the fastest growing sports in the world. Check out this forum to discuss the latest tips, tricks, gear and equipment in the world of mountain biking.

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Old 12-03-10, 10:53 AM   #101
Zephyr11
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Was this after a layoff? You did say you're just coming back to the trials, right? I find whenever I come back from a layoff particularly after getting hurt), I ride like a wuss until I get in some saddle time. If it's not a matter of saddle time, consider investing in some pads. Something like kneepads or a knee/shin system might give you a confidence boost. I'm more willing to commit when I'm wearing kneepads, not because they'll protect me from every injury, but because they just give me that little confidence boost (or false sense of security/invincibility, I'm not sure which one). Chelboed's controlled environment idea would also be great for confidence and getting comfortable on your bike again.
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Old 01-18-11, 11:58 PM   #102
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You seem like the kind of person who is..err...stuck up? Yeah, I guess that fits. I feel like there's a better word, but I can't think of it right now. You seem to have anger towards people who do the same things you probably did when you were at their stage of mountain biking. I agree with all the advice you gave, & it's all second nature & engraved in my brain from my BMX days when I was a kid, but that doesn't make it right. You seem too emotionally involved in other people decisions &, more so, in other people bikes. "...I watch them pick a line or treat their bike like a personal Sherman Tank..." So what? I can't bring myself to understand why it concerns you if other people man handle their bikes or treat them like a newborn baby. It's their personal decision that has no affect on you. Maybe some people enjoy beating the crap out of their bike. Maybe that's what fun is to them. That's what mountain biking is all about to me--FUN. It seems ridiculous to me for someone to have a list of rules on how to have fun, when the best part of trying new things is figuring out how to do them the way that you enjoy. I say keep this list of ADVICE on here, but edit it to make it just that--ADVICE. The way you say it makes it sounds like a list of mandatory rules for all new & old mountain bikers. Please, pardon me if I'm off base here. I mean no offense. I'm just trying to talk some sense into someone who appears to be too far up on their high horse to remember their less experienced biking days.
I've gone over my bars twice in two days. Once on a gravelly, rocky switchback. Once on a really technical, steep descent. I've read the advice given in this sticky and it's HELPFUL. I'm re-reading it to see if I can glean anything else, in fact.

Have your fun and do what you want, but I don't like falling or bashing my bike into things. That's why this is useful advice.

Having said that: what should I do on a technical descent when there's a big drop that rises up quickly on the other side? I went OTB yesterday because the descent was techy and I didn't have the time or balance to manual my front wheel over the hole. Maybe I should have been going slower...or faster. I dunno. What do you do in that situation (techy steep descent, wheel-sized hole to get across)?
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Old 01-19-11, 02:19 PM   #103
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I think Sam has probably grown a smidge since that post. He used to unknowingly put his foot in his mouth daily and wonder "just what that aweful taste was". It was like "silly remark"...something tastes like sox..."silly remark"...more sox.


I'm glad however that you're able to see my purpose for the thread. As I said...if you wanna beat the pizz outta your gear and you have the money to replace it, whatevah. I don't have an endless supply of cash, so I have to watch it.
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Old 01-24-11, 10:41 AM   #104
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I still stand by my point that Ed is a stuck up jerk!
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Old 01-31-11, 09:55 AM   #105
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I found this to be a useful post. I just went over my handlebars not too long ago. Couple tips from this post could have saved me from doing so IF I had read this post a couple wks. ago. Of course, I was caught so off guard when it happened that I'm not sure I would have been able to think of these tips at the time, but for future reference I will keep these tips in mind. I was able to catch myself and land on my feet! so that was the plus but the bike did take it's first or maybe second crash which I too do not like to trash my bike. Afterwards, I was way more concerned about the well being of my bike than myself and to my surprise I couldn't even find a scratch on it! Thanks for posting.
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Old 01-31-11, 05:07 PM   #106
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I still stand by my point that Ed is a stuck up jerk!
UnShun:



I'm still not speaking to you.

ReShun
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Old 02-01-11, 02:06 AM   #107
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best bf reply of all time. wow.
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Old 02-01-11, 11:13 AM   #108
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Old 03-02-11, 12:51 PM   #109
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what should I do on a technical descent when there's a big drop that rises up quickly on the other side? I went OTB yesterday because the descent was techy and I didn't have the time or balance to manual my front wheel over the hole. Maybe I should have been going slower...or faster. I dunno. What do you do in that situation (techy steep descent, wheel-sized hole to get across)?
The general answer is that you're supposed to try to land rear wheel first when taking big drops - you get out if the saddle and pull back on the bars to get the front wheel up, and take the shock with your knees as the bike lands. Because the landing is spread out by the lever action of the bike around the back wheel, the shock is greatly reduced. Real stars can take 10 foot drops this way. I can manage about 10 inches... No, I'm lying - I can manage about 10mm on the crosser I'm currently riding! I'm hoping to get back to 10 inches when I fit dirt drops and a short and high stem.

Oh - do NOT touch your brakes until you have finished landing! No, not even the back brake.

I think this is called a wheelie drop, and with that you should be able to google a video of how to do it properly.
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Old 03-06-11, 06:38 PM   #110
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It might be a little hard to grasp, but where I ride there are a LOT of roots, and usually on the descents and climbs. One thing I've found myself doing on the climbs (right or wrong) is that when the front tire begins to clear a root, I will almost use the front wheel like a lever to pull myself forward. Twisting sideways a bit, then back forwards. It never feels scary or out of control, and the wheels are fine after several trip out there. I am not putting all my force into doing this, just a little extra oomph up the trail. Not once has the front wheel felt like it was lodging between the roots or anything of the sort.

I don't seem to have any fear while doing it, and for the most part I am loose and comfortable. I have my body floating over the bike, shifting my weight, etc. Aside from having the front wheel wash out on a slippery bridge, I am not doing too bad I guess?,,,,BD
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Old 03-19-11, 11:04 PM   #111
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Hey all, first time in this sub-forum. Great tips and advice. Here's my two cents:

Get involved with a local club or association and help build/maintain trails. You can learn a lot from riding them, but you'll go one step further when you learn to build them. You'll start to recognize aspects of terrain and technical stuff and see better lines. Not to mention, you'll be rubbing shoulders with riders that are better than you and you'll pick up on things.
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Old 03-19-11, 11:23 PM   #112
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Old 04-15-11, 07:46 PM   #113
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i usually study my lines on my way up the hill and take mental notes about about the trail (roots there, loose pack here, deep cut coming up), so when you're coming back down six times faster, there wont be any gnarly surprises.
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Old 04-16-11, 10:33 AM   #114
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Good point! In the same spirit...if you can't see the bottom and you've never been there before...go slow enough to check it out before going full bore. Many a folded back rigid fork and tacoed front wheel have come from an over excited rider on a foreign trail.
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Old 04-19-11, 06:08 AM   #115
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Thanks for the tips chelboed...im sure they will help us noobs out
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Old 04-24-11, 04:28 PM   #116
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I have been taught, when biking, motorcycling, and driving a car, that you should NEVER cover your brakes. Never ever ever ever ever. I learned this the hard way while mtn biking when I grabbed hold of my front saint brake because I had it covered and endo'd over the front of the bike. It hurt.
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Old 04-27-11, 04:44 PM   #117
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When you say "cover your brakes"...do you mean ride with a finger over them so you can brake quickly?

'Cause that's common practice, quite acceptable on the trail / track, and IMO is safer than the alternative.
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Old 04-27-11, 06:25 PM   #118
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Common practice does not mean safe. One's first instinct when presented with fear is to grab on harder. If you're covering your brakes, youre going to stop yourself pretty dang quick when you likely dont mean or want to.
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Old 04-27-11, 08:46 PM   #119
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I cover on quick singletrack, But not if I'm getting airborne.
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Old 05-02-11, 08:37 AM   #120
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Common practice does not mean safe. One's first instinct when presented with fear is to grab on harder. If you're covering your brakes, youre going to stop yourself pretty dang quick when you likely dont mean or want to.
This is only if you lack the ability to train your instincts. I cover my front brake on my motorcycle every time I'm in traffic. I cover my brake on quick singletrack so long as the trail isn't too bumpy to keep my from pulling the lever by mistake. If you're new to two wheels, then no, you won't want to cover your brakes. If you've trained yourself to only grab your brakes when your scared, but only get scared when you should grab your brakes, then you're good to go. Just like your survival reaction to look where you don't want to go when you get scared, this instinct can be trained.
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Old 05-02-11, 08:38 AM   #121
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Lao Tzu, the Great Mountain Biking Sage sez:

The trail flows on without end. Flow. Riding without fear is the way of the trail. Neither braking nor accelerating to excess, both occur naturally. Relax. Fingers float where they may, they cannot cause a crash. Only mind can cause a crash. Calm down. One cannot seek to master the brakes by subduing the levers. Subdue the mind. Tires roll, rocks crunch, turn, pedal, breathe. Infinite shades of faster and slower; man, machine, and terrain have become one.

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Old 05-02-11, 11:19 AM   #122
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This is only if you lack the ability to train your instincts. I cover my front brake on my motorcycle every time I'm in traffic. I cover my brake on quick singletrack so long as the trail isn't too bumpy to keep my from pulling the lever by mistake. If you're new to two wheels, then no, you won't want to cover your brakes. If you've trained yourself to only grab your brakes when your scared, but only get scared when you should grab your brakes, then you're good to go. Just like your survival reaction to look where you don't want to go when you get scared, this instinct can be trained.
are you ****ing kidding me? Are you that dense? You can't train instinct. You can train your mind but in the event of sheer impending disaster, your instincts will take over no matter how well you think you've trained them. Much like when handling a gun, when you should only have your finger on the trigger if you are about to shoot, you should only cover your brakes if you are using them. Some day you'll be laying on the pavement because some ass in a cage swerved into your lane, you forgot everything you know, and your instinct made you grab that front brake you were covering it has happened to a lot of people, and if you think what you're doing is right, I will suggest some formal moorcycle training. What you are doing is wrong. End of story.
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Old 05-02-11, 03:52 PM   #123
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For crying out loud, now do I have to go dig up some pictures of World Cup DHers covering their brakes?

Vicelord, you are way out of your element here.
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Old 05-02-11, 03:54 PM   #124
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For crying out loud, now do I have to go dig up some pictures of World Cup DHers covering their brakes?

Vicelord, you are way out of your element here.
DHers are feathering their brakes almost the whole time, that's a totally different concept.
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Old 05-02-11, 05:30 PM   #125
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DHers are feathering their brakes almost the whole time, that's a totally different concept.
No they're not, and no it's not. And yes you can train instinct. That's why, as the saying goes, you never forget how to ride a bike. That's why I can hop off my mtb and go race my moto even though the front brake lever is on the other side.

I have been covering my brakes since about 1979 through BMX racing, XC racing, DH racing, trials riding, trail riding, freeriding, and offroad moto racing. I have never once crashed due to being on the brakes too quickly - it's usually the exact opposite.

I don't give a crap if you ride with both hands behind your back, but for you to categorically condemn a technique used successfully by thousands of riders in multiple disciplines and at all levels is shortsighted and irresponsible, particularly in a thread such as this.
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