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Old 07-29-09, 01:21 PM   #1
calvin17d
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Crown Height ???

Can I take the spacers from below my stem and put them on top of my stem on a threadless headset to lower the crown height or is that not a legit method?

The reason I ask is because I ve put a riser bar.

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Old 07-29-09, 01:34 PM   #2
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Yes you can do that. It does not change your 'crown height,' though. It changes your stem height. Crown height is more correctly called axle-to-crown height (or AtoC), which is a function of the built-in measurement of the distance from the center of the axle to the crown race of your particular fork.
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Old 07-29-09, 01:40 PM   #3
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Yes you can do that. It does not change your 'crown height,' though. It changes your stem height. Crown height is more correctly called axle-to-crown height (or AtoC), which is a function of the built-in measurement of the distance from the center of the axle to the crown race of your particular fork.
thanks for the clarification. I have seen articles about proper positions and body angles while riding road bikes. I assume their are similar guide lines for MTB's. I realize that components play a major role in the angles of your body. What are some suggested Geometries for descending on an AM/FR/DH bike?
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Old 07-29-09, 11:20 PM   #4
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Can I take the spacers from below my stem and put them on top of my stem on a threadless headset to lower the crown height or is that not a legit method?

The reason I ask is because I ve put a riser bar.
So why put on a riser bar if you're just going to negate the change in position by changing the spacers around?
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Old 07-29-09, 11:28 PM   #5
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So why put on a riser bar if you're just going to negate the change in position by changing the spacers around?
1. Riser Bar Adjustability. True, you can achieve an identical riding position with any given stem and flat-bar combo as with any stem and riser-bar combo. But dissenters are quick to dismiss the added adjustability of the riser bar setup as negligible. We completely disagree. The ability to make fine adjustments to overall length, up-sweep, and back-sweep is an invaluable tool for fine-tuning and personalizing your ride. On a typical 40mm rise handlebar, there is easily 20mm of usable fore-aft adjustability and several degrees of sweep adjustability available by simply rotating the bar. One cannot dismiss this!! Furthermore, the more rise, sweep and width a riser bar has, the greater the potential for adjustment (or maladjustment) your riding cockpit has. Depending on the design, some features will be more or less sensitive to changes with rotation than others, but there are enough design variations available to satisfy exactly what you are looking for. Some riders like up-sweep, some like down-sweep, and some don't know what they like yet, but you have the freedom to make changes easily with the riser design. Obviously these length and sweep adjustments cannot be made independently of each other, but risers allow you to do more experimentation and fine-tuning for less money and hassle than with a comparable long-stem, flat-bar setup. Geometrically speaking, riser bars make a lot of sense for the discriminating rider who places fit, function, and versatility ahead of weight savings, tradition, and technical fluff.

2. Riser bars look kewl.

Anything else feel free to contact my assistant....... Have a lovely evening!
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Old 07-30-09, 10:04 AM   #6
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1. Riser Bar Adjustability. True, you can achieve an identical riding position with any given stem and flat-bar combo as with any stem and riser-bar combo. But dissenters are quick to dismiss the added adjustability of the riser bar setup as negligible. We completely disagree. The ability to make fine adjustments to overall length, up-sweep, and back-sweep is an invaluable tool for fine-tuning and personalizing your ride. On a typical 40mm rise handlebar, there is easily 20mm of usable fore-aft adjustability and several degrees of sweep adjustability available by simply rotating the bar. One cannot dismiss this!! Furthermore, the more rise, sweep and width a riser bar has, the greater the potential for adjustment (or maladjustment) your riding cockpit has. Depending on the design, some features will be more or less sensitive to changes with rotation than others, but there are enough design variations available to satisfy exactly what you are looking for. Some riders like up-sweep, some like down-sweep, and some don't know what they like yet, but you have the freedom to make changes easily with the riser design. Obviously these length and sweep adjustments cannot be made independently of each other, but risers allow you to do more experimentation and fine-tuning for less money and hassle than with a comparable long-stem, flat-bar setup. Geometrically speaking, riser bars make a lot of sense for the discriminating rider who places fit, function, and versatility ahead of weight savings, tradition, and technical fluff.

2. Riser bars look kewl.

Anything else feel free to contact my assistant....... Have a lovely evening!
Uh, assistant...please turn off the canned recording. I was trying to get an actual opinion from calvin.

Was wondering what your goals were, not whoever wrote that. "Flat bars" can come with sweep, too. An adjustable setup like the Syntace VRO (which I use) is even more versatile. I was just wondering why you would just move the spacers around instead of trying the benefits of the higher hand position first, especially as you were looking for the "AM/FR/DH" thing. I should have known better since you had no idea of crown height or how your spacers worked...
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Old 07-30-09, 10:17 AM   #7
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I should have known better since you had no idea of crown height or how your spacers worked...
Correct, you should have known better, better than to make yet another ignorant comment. The truth of the matter is (since you seem to want to test my justification for a riser bar like youre the messiah of riding) I purchased the riser so that I could utilize the greater adjustability in the increased sweep that risers have over flat bars. As far as my spacer adjustments go, well I'd need to be moving the bars down to maintain a similar bar height wouldnt I? The idea behind the shortened stem and lowered hand height is that it brings your shoulders down and improves handling and keeping the riders center of gravity lower than a higher hand position. Though bar height was not my main goal I have made small spacer adjustments to bring the drop down a bit further. You're assumption was that I was making the change to achieve an alternate bar height....Your assumption was incorrect. Bike forums are here to learn about bicycle related topics, I learned a little about crown height and you learned a little about life.

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Old 07-31-09, 11:10 AM   #8
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Correct, you should have known better, better than to make yet another ignorant comment. The truth of the matter is (since you seem to want to test my justification for a riser bar like youre the messiah of riding) I purchased the riser so that I could utilize the greater adjustability in the increased sweep that risers have over flat bars. As far as my spacer adjustments go, well I'd need to be moving the bars down to maintain a similar bar height wouldnt I? The idea behind the shortened stem and lowered hand height is that it brings your shoulders down and improves handling and keeping the riders center of gravity lower than a higher hand position. Though bar height was not my main goal I have made small spacer adjustments to bring the drop down a bit further. You're assumption was that I was making the change to achieve an alternate bar height....Your assumption was incorrect. Bike forums are here to learn about bicycle related topics, I learned a little about crown height and you learned a little about life.
Keep reading the hype (MBA perhaps?). Your handling conclusion is pretty funny.
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Old 07-31-09, 12:04 PM   #9
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For what it's worth, calvin, there are a few flat bars out now that have all of the backsweep/upsweep characteristics of riser bars without the rise. It was mostly in answer to the burgeoning numbers of 29er riders who wanted a lower stance. An example:

AM Flat Top:
http://www.syncros.com/bars.htm
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