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Old 07-07-10, 08:10 PM   #1
Zan
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Would a non-ramped chainring help?

Hey guys. Gonna bother you with another question.

I run a 1x9 setup. It used to be 3x9. I have the 32 ring up front that came with the bike (granny and titan gear removed). I have a bashring on it now, and use my FD as a chain guide.

When I'm in the 34 or other large cog at the back, I sometimes drop the chain, always inside.

Ideally, I'd like to removed the FD and just run a nice and tidy 1x9 setup. I am wondering if a non-ramped ring would help me out here. I was reading up on Sheldon Brown's 2 cents on ramped rings, and I came across this:

"Ramped/pinned chainrings generally give improved shifting when moving from smaller to larger chainrings. The ramps and pins are always located on the side that faces the next smaller chainring. Ramps and pins are useless on the smallest chainring of a crankset, so they are normally found only on the outer rings."


Source: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gloss_ra-e.html

It's interesting that it improves shifting up the gears, and yet ramps are not found on the smallest ring, but are on the largest?

Anyways, what do you think?

Thanks!
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Old 07-07-10, 09:50 PM   #2
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It's interesting that it improves shifting up the gears, and yet ramps are not found on the smallest ring, but are on the largest?
They help get the chain to the ring where they're located from the smaller ring. There's nothing smaller than the smallest, so they wouldn't do anything there.
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Old 07-07-10, 10:05 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Zan View Post
Hey guys. Gonna bother you with another question.

I run a 1x9 setup. It used to be 3x9. I have the 32 ring up front that came with the bike (granny and titan gear removed). I have a bashring on it now, and use my FD as a chain guide.

When I'm in the 34 or other large cog at the back, I sometimes drop the chain, always inside.

Ideally, I'd like to removed the FD and just run a nice and tidy 1x9 setup. I am wondering if a non-ramped ring would help me out here. I was reading up on Sheldon Brown's 2 cents on ramped rings, and I came across this:

"Ramped/pinned chainrings generally give improved shifting when moving from smaller to larger chainrings. The ramps and pins are always located on the side that faces the next smaller chainring. Ramps and pins are useless on the smallest chainring of a crankset, so they are normally found only on the outer rings."


Source: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gloss_ra-e.html

It's interesting that it improves shifting up the gears, and yet ramps are not found on the smallest ring, but are on the largest?

Anyways, what do you think?

Thanks!
Yes, it might help, because a ss ring would have teeth all the same height. Rings w/ ramps and pins also have shorter teeth in places. It could be that the chain is coming off at those points. You might be able to tell if that's the case by testing it out.
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Old 07-08-10, 08:20 AM   #4
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How's your chain length? See if you can move your chain ring to the left. They make downhill guides that are like a bashguard on both sides of the chainring to keep it from faling off.
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Old 07-09-10, 10:26 AM   #5
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Put the granny ring back on to catch the chain when it falls off, then you can put it back at your convenience. (:
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Old 07-09-10, 11:27 AM   #6
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Yes. Even better, is this.

http://www.gvtc.com/~ngear/whatis.html

Ditch the front mech for one of those. Replace your ramped ring with an unramped when it dies.
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Old 07-09-10, 12:00 PM   #7
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I run 1x9 on one of my bikes. I run a Race Face downhill ring, which has no shaping of the teeth. It's just a plain old ring.

I also run an MRP 1.x chainguide. I would have just locked down a front derailleur, but the bike was not designed for one, and did not have clearance for one.

I briefly experimented running without a guide, but even with a plain old ring it is too easy for me to nudge the chain off with just a small bit of finger pressure. So I put on the guide and have been happy ever since.
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