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Old 07-08-10, 02:33 PM   #1
dynikus
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tubeless tires?

Hey, I was just wondering if tubeless tires are any good? I just got a flat on my rear tire, and I was wondering if I should just go buy a new tube, or go for a set of tubeless. Thanks in advance
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Old 07-08-10, 03:58 PM   #2
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I used them on my mtb's for a couple of years and then switched back to tubes.
My likes - They seemed to get fewer flats than my tubed tires and didn't lose as much air when the bike sat for a few days (still lost air though so had to pump before riding). I hear a lot of people talk about how great it is to run mtb tires at lower pressures, say around 30-35 psi and tubeless doesn't tend to pinch flat as easliy at these lower pressures but I run my tires at around 38-42 psi anyway so that wasn't a benefit I realized. I don't like the feel of lower pressures on the terrain I ride. It feels too loosey goosey.
My dislikes - Cost, hassle when I did get flats (and I did-many flats), the need to surge pressure in the rim/tire to seat the bead (who has a compressor on the trail?), the tighter fit of the tire/rim combo requires a stout tire iron to ensure you can get the tire off the rim and re-install when you have put a tube in or fixed the flat on the tubeless etc. With tubeless, you can fix a tire with a tire patch but seating the tire on the rim is tough. You can also put in a tube and then fix the tire at home and reinstall or go buy another tubeless tire. With a tubed system you fix or replace the tube on the trail and your good to go. I haven't needed tire irons for years when removing a tire since switching back to tubes.
I have run into 2 close freinds on the trial walking their tubeless tire equipped bikes back to their car. In both instances, they had either forgotten or misplaced spare tubes, pump etc. (some required item) due to the infrequent flats they got with tubeless. They had become complacent and didn't carry the needed gear to fix a flat. If you go tubeless, remember to still carry the needed tools and tube to fix a flat so you don't get stuck.
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Old 07-08-10, 05:19 PM   #3
dynikus
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Ah, alright. Thanks for the info.
I'll probably stick with tubes then
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Old 07-08-10, 08:54 PM   #4
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Yeah tubless are made for runnin low pressure, better bite on roots etc and no pinch flats. I have 2 sets but the valve stem broke on 1 and its $25 to replace.
So I run Ghetto with tubes. You can use higher pressure with tubes as well. I ran some Maxxis worm drives at 55psi (pumped up in a 75 degree room) and
rode them outside at 95+ and in 5 miles after going up some steep short hills the rear blew off the rim.
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Old 07-09-10, 07:01 PM   #5
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Another opinion.
I recently converted my Epic 29er to tubeless, and am loving it so far. The lower tire pressures (now at 28 front, 30 rear) really work for me on the local trails (lots of rocks, roots, logs, mud). The ride is more comfy, and climbing grip on soft terrain seems improved.
The sealant does not take care of every puncture problem. Works well for thorns, and small rock cuts. In a race I did a few weeks ago, I came upon a guy that had been leading the SS race, but had a larger hole in his tire from a stick. His tubeless tire would not seal, and he did not have any repair stuff. I loaned him my pump, but he ended up dropping out.
As far as tire installation, I guess this will depend on the tire and rim combination in use. I have not had any problems at all with the tubeless installation on my bike. Tires mount on the rim easily. The tires and rims on my bike were tubeless compatible when I bought the bike, so my expense to convert was minimal (only the sealant). I always carry a spare tube and either a pump or co2 inflator. Have not had a flat yet, but when I do get one, I plan to repair with a tube on the trail, and convert back to tubeless at home.
Like everything, some like tubeless, and some don't. I'm liking it now, but will admit my experience is only about 2 months, so the opinion could change.

To the OP, you ask if you should buy a new tube after getting a flat on the rear. If you don't have a spare tube, you should get one. But keep in mind the flatted tube from your bike can likely be patched and you can continue using it.
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Old 07-09-10, 07:08 PM   #6
Covalent Jello
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I duno about tubeless. But used to get flats allllll the time with conventional tubes. Then, went out and got some extra thick thorn resistant tubes. Put that green slime stuff in just in case something did indeed puncture them. It can repair up to a 1/8" hole or something. Have never had a flat since, it is a glorious thing. Used to get pinch flats/thorn flats all the time. I'd rather do that than tubeless...
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Old 07-09-10, 07:19 PM   #7
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i run 25 front 28 rear psi with tubes and have had no pinch flats.
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