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Old 11-15-04, 12:37 AM   #1
Anthony King
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Non-suspension fork?

Hey guys. I use a Dahon Matrix as my primary mode of transportation. I never really take it off road. It comes with slick tires, but a suspension fork--not really sure why. I would like to take the suspension fork off since I figure it just slows me down. Does anyone know where to find a good non-suspension fork for a 26" wheel?
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Old 11-15-04, 01:17 AM   #2
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First of all you will need to measure you axle-to-crown distance and rake. Then choose a suspension-corrected fork with a similar AtC/rake in order to preserve the handling traits. A fork with a shorter AtC will make the bike twitchier. A fork with a longer rake will probably make the bike twitchier too as it will decrease your trail.

As for fork suggestions, I would personally recommend the Surly 1x1 or the Kona Project 2. Both of those are high-quality yet relatively inexpensive rigid steel forks that are suitable for both road and offroad riding. Tange also makes a pretty cheap fork. I'm not necessarily suggesting you buy from them but check out Bikeman's online catalogue for some ideas.
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Old 11-15-04, 05:02 AM   #3
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The Surly fork looks to be a good option, but I would go with the instigator since it's corrected for a 100mm suspension fork. It does weigh 3.1 lbs, so it's no featherweight, that's for sure. I'm not sure what your suspension fork weighs but in most cases you'd be shaving a pound or two by switching to the surly fork. The 1x1 doesn't say anything about being corrected for a suspension fork, but does weigh 2.34 lbs so its lighter.
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Old 11-15-04, 05:41 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cryogenic
The 1x1 doesn't say anything about being corrected for a suspension fork, but does weigh 2.34 lbs so its lighter.
The Surly 1x1 is corrected for very short travel suspension geometries (~65mm - ~70mm). I agree that for medium travel suspension, an Instigator is a better choice with a 447mm AtC.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Surly
We now have two 1x1 forks to offer. Our new 1x1 fork comes with International Standard disc mounts and removable canti pivots. Otherwise, it's the same fork as our tried-and-true original 1x1 fork... which means you can stuff 2.7inch tires between the blades and have room to spare. Both forks are built with 4130 cro-moly tubing, suspension-corrected geometry, 1-1/8inch threadless steerers, and black powdercoat. 413mm axle to crown.

Rake: 45mm
Steerer: 260mm
Weight: w/tabs 2.34 lbs. (1.1 kg)
Personally, I like the Kona Project 2 which is lighter than the Surly forks and costs less. However, it has an even shorter AtC (410mm) so it's probably only good for 60mm suspension designs although I believe there's an 80mm suspension-corrected version too.

Here's a nice link to various manufacturers of rigid MTB forks.
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Last edited by khuon; 11-15-04 at 05:49 AM.
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Old 11-15-04, 06:58 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by khuon
First of all you will need to measure you axle-to-crown distance and rake. Then choose a suspension-corrected fork with a similar AtC/rake in order to preserve the handling traits.
just out of curiosity as I have toyed with the idea of swapping the suspension fork on my commuter-what is a "suspension corrected fork" and what would be the consequence of not getting one?
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Old 11-15-04, 07:03 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by royalflash
just out of curiosity as I have toyed with the idea of swapping the suspension fork on my commuter-what is a "suspension corrected fork" and what would be the consequence of not getting one?
Suspension corrected forks have an axle to crown measurement that matches those of typical suspension forks. MTB frames are designed to handle a certain way with a fork of certain suspension travel and thus axle-to-crown lengths. If you get a fork with a shorter AtC than what the frame was designed for, you will end up with a lower front end and a twitchier bike. And the opposite would be true. A fork with a greater AtC than what the frame was designed to use will raise your front end and make your steering more lax.
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Old 11-15-04, 07:07 AM   #7
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thanks Khuon
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Old 11-15-04, 03:11 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by khuon
First of all you will need to measure you axle-to-crown distance and rake.
Could someone tell me how to measure these? Sorry for the novice question.
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Old 11-15-04, 03:32 PM   #9
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Just out of curiosity, does one make the axle to crown measurement while the suspension fork is loaded? I would assume so. If so, this measurement can vary by a few mm depending on the weight of the rider.
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Old 11-15-04, 03:47 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Fixer
Just out of curiosity, does one make the axle to crown measurement while the suspension fork is loaded? I would assume so. If so, this measurement can vary by a few mm depending on the weight of the rider.
Actually, I think it's most pragmatic to measure the AtC when the rider is on the bike with the proper sag set. Either that or refer to the fork manufacturer's stated figure because that's probably what the frame manufacturer took into consideration when laying out the geometry. but you're right, because the AtC and the rake can change during the travel, it's hard to settle on the "proper" figure.
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Old 11-15-04, 03:53 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony King
Could someone tell me how to measure these? Sorry for the novice question.
Measure a beeline from the center of the axle at the dropout to the top of the crown at the bottom of the headtube.
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Old 01-26-05, 04:25 PM   #12
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what did you end up doing AK ????? Any problems ?
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