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  1. #1
    la vache fantôme phantomcow2's Avatar
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    Would i benefit from 80mm of travel?

    I was doing osme thinking, i have 100mm of travel on my fork and im just wondering if i even use all that. I have some confusion about the consequences of too much travel, i think i read that it is not as efficient on longer trips. If that is so, im thinking 80 might be the best. Would losing 20mm benefit me on the longer trips?

  2. #2
    Campy or bust :p cryogenic's Avatar
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    Well, I do know that it will make your bike a bit more "twitchy" though I'm not sure how 20mm could make that much difference in so-called efficiency. I think the fork's construction and internals tends to have more effect on efficiency than the amount of travel it has.

  3. #3
    Withdrawal Symptoms! Cornish_Rdr_UK's Avatar
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    Your bike will handle better, and i suppose over really long trips it would be more efficient...

    But i would stick with 100mm tavel personally, i mean, i cant see 20mm making too much difference

  4. #4
    Too old for this... mosk's Avatar
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    I just went through this with my setup. It all depends on your frame's geometry. Before you change anything, it would be a good idea to get a protractor and see where you're at (keeping in mind whatever sag your current fork requires...) In my case (~1997 hardtail frame) the extra 20mm did make a difference: the handling was slower, and when climbing really steep stuff there was more of a tendency for the front wheel to lift. However, I ride cross country, and I don't do especially fast descents, so your mileage may vary.

    -Jeff

  5. #5
    Te mortuo heres tibi sim? scrublover's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phantomcow2
    I was doing osme thinking, i have 100mm of travel on my fork and im just wondering if i even use all that. I have some confusion about the consequences of too much travel, i think i read that it is not as efficient on longer trips. If that is so, im thinking 80 might be the best. Would losing 20mm benefit me on the longer trips?

    you'll maybe notice it effecting your handling more than your efficiency. caveat: that depends on what fork you have now, vs. what you may change to. a 100mm fork that is stiff and doesn't bob all over the place will be more efficient than a 80mm fork that is flexy and bobs all over. it would help if you told us your frame/fork comb, and what type of trails you ride.

    roughly, a 25mm change (less in your case) in axle to crown height will steepen your head angle by roughly one degree. you may or may not notice any change in your handling from this. it all depends on the angles your frame was designed with. steeper angle generally steers faster, slacker generally steers slower. though this can also be effected by your position on the bike, your bar/stem lenght and width, and how stiff your fork is or isn't.

    depending on your fork, you may be able to reduce it down to 80mm or so, rather than buying a new fork. if possible, try that first to see if you like the change.

    i've got a headangle on my current ride that is 3 degrees slacker than what my first mtb had 12 years ago. i much prefer the slacker angles. i can't really see 20mm LESS travel making much of a change in efficiency.
    I believe the clouds in my coffee more than the weatherman on t.v.

  6. #6
    la vache fantôme phantomcow2's Avatar
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    Well i have an old Judy 100 fork. Its time for a replacement, i was looking at englund air cartridges but was told to just get a new fork.

  7. #7
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    I think it depends mostly on the fork. Both my previous 75 to 80 mm forks were not all that stiff. That is, even at their lower settings there was a lot of slop/bending in the tubes. The last fork, which came on my new bike, would actually interfere with steering when I hit a bump.

    Though both forks had the facility for 100 mm, they were not built well enough to handle it. My new Fox is a different breed. It does 100 mm very well and far better than the old forks did at 75/80. I like the extra travel for more comfort and control plus the greater ground clearance.

    As far as handling is concerned, I didn't notice a change. If anything, the greater front height will tend to reduce the effective head-tube angle I would think, making the steering a tad slower.

    Not a problem for me as my stump jumper is the fastest steering bike I've ever owned. The short stem I have to use to get behind the seat probably contributes to that.

    Al

  8. #8
    The Rabbi seely's Avatar
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    For efficiency a Terralogic/SPV platform (even on a longer fork) will be vastly more efficient than a shorter travel non-SPV fork.

  9. #9
    Colorado Trail Rider
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    as stated, the make, model and manufacture will have more of an impact on the performance that changing from 100 to an 80mm travel.

    But changing will affect the handling, going shorter will make the bike react quicker, (read as twitchy), but that works for some people.
    I went from an 80/100 to a 100/120, made my bike a bit slower by lengthing the wheelbase about 3/4 inch.
    took a little getting used, had to lean a bit more to keep traction on the front wheel.
    BT
    05 Giant NRS 22.5in
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    "All I need is.......two wheels and the truth."

  10. #10
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    i just went from a 105mm x-vert air to a 80mm sid xc. the difference was huge. i could steer and control my bike better, and i also got rid of the "chopper effect." also, i seem to be getting more travel out of my 80mm fork. with the x-vert i often got 2-3 inches or less travel, but the sid i get close to the fuller range (without bottoming of course).

    btw, judy's with total air's is a great combo, for xc at least. the judy's are pretty stiff and with total airs they will be plush as ever and super light.
    i won't deny it i'm a straight ridah

  11. #11
    la vache fantôme phantomcow2's Avatar
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    I actually came super close to buying total air cartridges but i actually decided to get a new fork, the seals on the Judy's are crap so i would have replaced that too anyway

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