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Old 06-29-12, 05:38 AM   #1
Discusman
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Bike Frames on Ebay

Hi Guys,

I have been looking on Ebay for bike frames. There are a lot of them seem to have a good price. However, how would I know the particular one is DH frame, AM frame, Trial frame or CX frame?

I can definitely ask the seller, but I suppose this piece of information should be included in the description, but it doesn't. There is no information about degree of the angle of the head either.

For example, Specialized S-Work. Is it a AM frame or a CX frame? Would you consider a frame that is around 5 lb light weight?

Thanks
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Old 06-29-12, 10:35 AM   #2
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Did you know the internet can be your friend? You can go to say... the Specialized website and it will tell you all about their bikes. Also there is information about what is a CX, AM, DH bike (but I assume you already know that).

Basically do as much research as you can on the internet or by going ot bike shops before you shop either eBay or CL. Be educated about the product and you will be less likely to get ripped... it also helps to know what sort of bike you want. If you are wanting AM, then don't bother looking at DH or CX rigs. Narrow your search criteria but be aware some sellers (ie usually people who have stolen the the bikes) don't know what theya re selling...
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Old 06-29-12, 11:15 AM   #3
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Right now, your approach is a bit backward. If you are determined to build a bike from the frame up, I suggest you do your homework a bit and know what you are doing before launching into it.

You are much better off hunting eBay for a specific frame than using your random scatter-gun approach. Figure out what kind of bike you want to build (XC? AM? A little in between?) and then do some research and decide what frames would most fill that bill for YOU. Create yourself a solid list of a half-dozen specific brands/models that really trip your trigger, THEN hunt for those particular frames in the size you need. It may take a while but you will: #1 get the proper type of frame for what you want it to do; and #2 get the best frame for the money spent.
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Old 06-29-12, 12:08 PM   #4
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5 pounds would be a light downhill frame. I personally like my 2.2 pound XC frame. And that is a 21" XXL frame to boot.
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Old 06-29-12, 01:11 PM   #5
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5 pounds would be a light downhill frame.
Huh?
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Old 06-29-12, 02:00 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Discusman View Post
how would I know the particular one is DH frame, AM frame, Trial frame or CX frame?
If you can't tell the difference, you really shouldn't be looking on ebay, the difference of these 4 frame designs is very obvious, and all are designed for a very different purpose / riding types.

You need to identify what type of riding you will be doing, then look for a frame for it, but buying a complete bike will almost always be cheaper and simpler, especially with the ever changing standards MTB's have.

For a Specialized S Works, with out giving more details, it could be a Venge or an Epic, or a Stumpjumper or a Roubaix etc, just as much as a AM frame or CX, more info needed. S-Works is just Specailzed word for their race line, and covers many bikes, bike parts and clothing items.
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Old 06-29-12, 06:05 PM   #7
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I want an all mountain bike. I have an 10 yrs old XC fully suspension bike. I just want to swap the frame. My current bike has Shimano XT components except the wheel (Mavic D521) brakes, seat post, handle bar, stem and wheel hub. The front fork is Rockshox SID Dual Air. Not sure all these components would fit the new frame (not brand new, probably 2-3 yrs old frames). I'm currently looking at Specialized Epic frame, Trek Top Fuel 9.7, Giant Reign 2 frame, Rocky Mountain Element 10 FS frame, Specialized stumpjumper.

I'm 5'7" and frame size between 17 - 18 should be good? My current bike is 15".

I assume it will not cost me an arm and a leg to get a frame (Non Carbon). So I guess 5lb AM or XC frame is considered heavy?
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Old 06-29-12, 06:35 PM   #8
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Your looking at a wide range of bikes which are mainly XC, the Giant being more AM, along with the Stumpjumper depending on year. The Trek & Rocky Mountain are at opposite ends of the market, with the Trek being a high end carbon frame & the RM being bugdet aluminium or high end carbon depending on the year.

No matter what you look at, expect a lot of your current parts not to fit a newer frame, and not sure what benefit you are expecting to get putting a set of 28mm SID's on any modern bike, as it the front end will be very flexy. You may find that the SID has too little travel for a 3 year old frame, if the SID is 10 years old, it is probably 80mm max travel, most frames which are 3 years old will be designed for 100 or 120mm travel forks.

For size, you mey get away with a 17" but probably not 18", but you really need to try each individual bike built up to know this. Whats wrong with the size you are currently using?

For the frames your looking at, 3 years in full suspension design with either have stayed the same, or radically altered manufacture dependant, also a 3 year old frame could need a lot of work, so budget for a shock service & bearing / bushing replacement whatever you choose.

Last edited by jimc101; 06-29-12 at 06:39 PM.
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Old 06-29-12, 07:47 PM   #9
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I wish I can test ride all these different type of bike before I can decide which one I want. I do not think my LBS will allow me to test ride their new bikes especially when I have no intention of buying one from them. And I am not getting a brand new 2012 bike anyway.

The reason I want to do the frame swap is because my bike (Fastrax under Kona) is bit heavy for a XC bike (probably 40+lb, I will weight it). Everyone has been talking about how good the handling these late model bikes are (with better designed calculated geometry). The frames that I have been looking on Ebay do not come with a fork, so you are saying my SID will not work well with the newer frames.

It seems I will need to spend decent amount of money if I decided to do this.

What components I can get to improve my current bike's performance and handling? Can I swap the front fork with something that has longer travel and swap my rear coilover to an air shock?

Last edited by Discusman; 06-29-12 at 07:51 PM.
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Old 06-30-12, 12:38 PM   #10
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Ok, I measured my bike today. It's 27lb and front fork has 120mm travel (I'm assuming I measured correctly). The fork is soft even though the air pressure is correct according to the air pressure/rider's body weight. So if I decided want to upgrade my front fork, anything that has at least 120mm travel should be good for my bike? The longer travel means stiffer front fork?
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Old 06-30-12, 01:05 PM   #11
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Ok, I measured my bike today. It's 27lb and front fork has 120mm travel (I'm assuming I measured correctly).
That isn't a bad weight for a full suspension bike with 120mm travel apart from newer designs, to get a significant weight saving, will involve replacing much more than just the frame

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The fork is soft even though the air pressure is correct according to the air pressure/rider's body weight. So if I decided want to upgrade my front fork, anything that has at least 120mm travel should be good for my bike?
Does it need a service? For upgrading, you will be limited by what the frame can take, which includes travel, headset size and for your wheel, axle type.

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The longer travel means stiffer front fork?
No, 28mm SID's were designed to be light weight, that meant that they were very flexible; this has nothing to do with the travel, the new design (2011 onward) model of the SID which has a similar lower design and the same 32mm stanchions as the Reba, and is very stiff compared to the old 28mm model
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Old 06-30-12, 05:39 PM   #12
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I guess there are not that many things I could do to reduce overall weight of the bike unless I go carbon all the way. Here is the list of components:

1 - Size 15 Eastern Taperwall Frame
2 - Kore Head Stem
3 - Hell Bent Handle Bar
4 - 1/8" VP Headset
5 - Mavic D521 ceramic wheels
6 - JBC Pro Wheel Hubs with SRAM quick wheel release (not sure the size of axle)
7 - Shimano XT gear shifter and 27 speed front/rear Derailleur and crank
8 - Navigator 6 piston hydraulic disk brakes (I probably going to upgrade this with Shimano XT M-786 later)
9 - VMN rear coilover suspension
10 - Rockshox SID Dual Air with 120 travel
11 - 26" Huchinson Mosquito Superlite Tires

Would you consider these component decent except the brake set? Where should I start if I want to do some upgrade to reduce weight and improve handling of this bike?
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Old 06-30-12, 06:04 PM   #13
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From your list, the stem, handlebar & seatpost could all be replaced with lighter ones, and the big one would be the wheels (if you have QR wheels, you have a 9mm axle)

However, the current weigh of you bike is what you would expect for a Alu frame 120mm full suspension bike, and any upgrades to save weight are going to cost a lot of money, unless it's broken, would save that money until you can afford a 2013/2014 bike with at 2x10 (with clutch) drive train, 15mm / 142mm rear axle tubeless wheels & a dropper seatpost, then you will really notice a difference to your current bike; and it will be cheaper long term to buy a complete bike than upgrade part by part a 10 year old bike.

Weight isn't everything, dropper seatpost weigh a lot more than a standard Alu and much more than a carbon one, yet in the few years they have been around, they have become almost standard for trail riders, there control / improved handling is wanted more than the loss of a few grams.
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Old 06-30-12, 06:51 PM   #14
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Thanks for the insight. The other concern that I have if I buy a new bike is I have no room to store another bike if I am unable to sell the old one. But I got your point, I guess I just replace whatever the part breaks and save the money for a new bike.

How much would u think I can sell my 10 yrs old bike for?
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Old 06-30-12, 08:30 PM   #15
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The correct size of a head set should be 1-1/8" not 1/8", correct? It says 1/8" on my headset, but I looked majority of head sets are listed 1-1/8".
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