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Old 03-24-13, 08:02 AM   #1
UMassAm
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help me set up this downhill enduro expert for cross country/all mountain

Just picked up a 2007 Enduro Expert on craigslist. Right now, it's set up for downhill and I want it to be better equipped for cross country racing. It will need to shed a few pounds. Already swapped out for a longer seatpost and set the saddle. Here are some things I'm wondering, you may or may not have answers, or it might end up just being personal preference, but:

Risers or flat for handlebars?
Stem length?
Right now have 32 spoke-count wheels, can I go lower and shave some weight?
Beefy downhill tires right now, what are some lightweight tires for cross country/all mountain?
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How can I do this and break even, selling off old components?
How the heck do I learn the right suspension settings for crosscountry/all mountain?

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Old 03-24-13, 08:39 AM   #2
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posting a picture of your bike as it sits now would help alot to see what we have to work with. does your bike have the beefy fox 160mm forks? i dont think those had travel adjustments, wouldnt be a great climber, but that bike was made to go down not up. i had the long travel forks on my trek y-glide and swapped them out for a set of rock shox recon forks, the bike is lighter and climbs a lot better now. the handlebars and stem length are going to be whatever fits you best in my opinion.
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Old 03-24-13, 11:06 AM   #3
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If it's currently stock, you could turn it into a credible AM bike, but you are starting with the wrong frame to make a XC bike.

What condition is the bike currently in, if ridden hard, you will need to work out if things like the drive train, forks, rear shock, shock bushings, wheels, brakes & headset have any life left in them. Getting more than a couple of seasons out of a bike that is ridden hard (without refurbishment) is good and your bike is pretty old.

For you specifics Q's

Riser or straight - very few people ride with straight bars now, even for XC, would look low rise and wide, say 680mm narrowest, 720-780 would be normal now
Stem Length - depends on the setup, stems have been getting shorter, but it needs a bike designed for short stems, in the case of the Enduro Expert, if the fork is stock, the question is moot, as the stem is integrated to the fork
Wheels - again, the fork limits everything, as it's a 20mm through axle, you will need a difference fork if you want to change to lighter wheels.
Tyres - find other local riders, and see what they are using, tyre choice can be regional/local, local riders will know what's good for your conditions

For selling parts, Ebay, Craigslist, you would need to work out if anything is worth selling. For parts like the fork, 2007 is old, especially dual crowns, and the want for brands/fashion change each season, whats in this year would be obsolete / not wanted by next, so you need to research if they have any value, again condition will play a major factor in if they have and re-sale value.

For suspension setup, a guide is often on a sticker on the shock / fork, but what you have really isn't the greatest starting point for XC.
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Old 03-24-13, 12:00 PM   #4
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OK. it's a marcchozi 66 fork, need to get more info. I was definitely kind of impulsive on this one, didn't do enough homwork, but thought it'd be a good deal at a grand.

wondering, what about the frame disposes it to downhill rather than climbing? or can right fork and suspension settings make it right?
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Old 03-24-13, 12:12 PM   #5
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Old 03-24-13, 12:15 PM   #6
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The Marzocchi 66 indicates that what you have is not stock, would go through the bike, and ID everything on it, and the condition it's in before proceeding any further, then at least you know what you are dealing with.

It should make good AM bike, but condition is everything (after fit), expect it to need some work on things like the rear shock DU bushing.

Have you ridden it yet? as this will give a basic idea of what the bike in it's current state will do, and if it will be adaptable to an AM bike.
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Old 03-24-13, 12:23 PM   #7
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That's a 2006 model, not a 2007. The 2006 is more AM than the 2007, from the photo, it looks well used, but everything as above about condition and fit stands
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Old 03-24-13, 03:35 PM   #8
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I'd say shed the suspension fork for a lighter, less travel one. That looks like 8" of travel to me but you should be good with 3-4 inches of travel. Those also look like hydraulic brakes to me so you should probably replace those with mechanical ones if you think that'll take off some weight.

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Old 03-24-13, 03:37 PM   #9
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I have ridden it, but forced with the lower set saddle because the old post was cut. I added a longer post with a fizik antares saddle for now. Overall felt good, if bouncy on flat. was slow and felt heavy.

On condition, it was pretty well used, but it seems in general good repair- to the extent that I know how to assess the rear end, the rear bearings don't appear rusted or anything, no squeeking there, but squeeling brakes (new pads in august).

Specs:
Wheels - Sun SOS 32 rims, Shimano FH-M25 hubs, 32 spoke
Spare wheel - Mavic EX729 rim, specialized hub, 36 spoke
Tires - F: Maxxis Minion DH, R: Clutch 26x2.3
Brakes - Avid Juicy 7's
Shifters - Sram x5
Rear Derailleur - Sram x9
Front Derailleur - Shimano Deore LX
Crank - Truvativ Stylo 172.5mm
Rear Suspension - Fox DHX5.0
Fork - 2007 marzocchi 66 rcv
FSA headset
Deity 50mm stem
Deity 171mm end-to-end grey riser handlebars
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Old 03-24-13, 03:48 PM   #10
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I'd say shed the suspension fork for a lighter, less travel one. That looks like 8" of travel to me but you should be good with 3-4 inches of travel. Those also look like hydraulic brakes to me so you should probably replace those with mechanical ones if you think that'll take off some weight.

Josh
3-4" of travel is too little for an enduro.
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Old 03-24-13, 03:53 PM   #11
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3-4" of travel is too little for an enduro.
why's that?
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Old 03-24-13, 04:06 PM   #12
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bike's designed around 150-160mm of travel. 3-4 will make the front of the bike too steep and will make the handling horrible.
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Old 03-24-13, 04:36 PM   #13
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Overall felt good, if bouncy on flat. was slow and felt heavy.
Not much is going to fix the heavy issue, would not recommend the suggestion of dumping the hydraulic brakes for mechanical, you would see a drop in performance for minimal weight loss.

For the bounce, you need to play (most likely increase) with the air pressure in the shocks, you need a shock pump for this, instructions for both the shocks (F&R) should be available on the respective manufactures webs sites.

For a cheap / cost effective weight loss, look at simple things, pull the inner tubes, a lot of rotational weight can be saved getting lighter weight ones, the tyres are another thing to look at, but going smaller is a trade off with reduced performance. Doing much else is going to involve a lot of cost.
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Old 03-24-13, 05:12 PM   #14
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3-4" of travel is too little for an enduro.
You're right. Now that I imagine what a 4" travel fork would look like on that bike, I think you should stick with the 8". It might look weird doing XC with that fork but it's better than sliding forward on a 4" travel fork.

Josh
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Old 03-24-13, 07:26 PM   #15
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bike's designed around 150-160mm of travel. 3-4 will make the front of the bike too steep and will make the handling horrible.
where can I learn more about the travel range for the enduro frame? the fork has 180mm of travel, and according to the manufacturer, intended for downhill.
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Old 03-24-13, 08:14 PM   #16
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Oh for pity's sake; it is NOT a downhill bike nor is it "intended for downhill." It is a long-travel trail/AM bike.
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Old 03-24-13, 08:52 PM   #17
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Heh, when I saw "2007," I had that Enduro with the dual-crown fork pictured. That fork looked oddly out of place on that bike, IMO.

If you're actually talking about cross-country racing, and you're pretty serious about racing...well, I'd say ride this season on it, get some experience, then unload it on Craigslist and get an actual XC bike. It's an all-mountain bike, not a downhill bike, so you can still point it uphill and it'll get the job done...it just won't be as fast as a dedicated XC bike.
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