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  1. #26
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    lol the mtb forum is awesome nowadays, you can launch a ****storm with any thread

    On topic though: I bought a 29er mtb specifically for my commute. I put big apples on it (is that enough for another ****storm?) and it rides very comfortably, so much so that I am faster on it than on my road bike for the moderate effort level I want to ride at. If you plan on going all-out on every ride, the road bike is superior in my opinion. If you're going to pace yourself and ride moderate speeds, I think the mtb will be far better. The only time I miss my road bike is in wicked headwinds.

  2. #27
    Senior Member tom25's Avatar
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    I find my 29er slow and sluggish on the road with knobbys. With slicks its 3mph faster. My road bike is another 3mph faster still. It depends on the mission but a MTB with slicks is a nice all around ride.
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  3. #28
    Pedals, Paddles and Poles Daspydyr's Avatar
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    I think this was a reincarnated Roadie taking out some angst on the MTBers.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BZ1ZkNg4Qc8
    I think its disgusting and terrible how people treat Lance Armstrong, especially after winning 7 Tour de France Titles while on drugs!

    I can't even find my bike when I'm on drugs. -Willie N.

  4. #29
    Senior Member Mountain Mitch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wooden Tiger View Post
    Well, in my case I already proved that theory to be incorrect. I had more better luck on group rides while on my MTB than on my roadie, and these people aren't in "very bad shape." I had no issues with keeping up while on my MTB but when I went out on the roadie, I was struggling hard, so... .
    Yeh, I guess that's why they banned mountain bikes from the Giro &the Tour de France!

  5. #30
    Senior Member LesterOfPuppets's Avatar
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    Could you imagine?

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  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain Mitch View Post
    Yeh, I guess that's why they banned mountain bikes from the Giro &the Tour de France!
    I guess it goes to show today anything is possible!
    Last edited by Dannihilator; 06-14-13 at 09:06 PM.
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  7. #32
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    As stated by others in the above posts, a mountain bike, or it's cousin the hybrid bike, are both capable to ride on a paved surface; aka road. Tires, saddle, gearing, geometry, manufacturer, bike fit along with a host of other details will make a difference in the enjoyment of your ride. Ya pays your money and makes your choice. I rode the LACBC River Ride, 36 mile loop, this past weekend on my factory stock Specialized Hardrock Disc 26er. Overall I had no major problems. Comfort was good until the last 3-4 miles since the saddle is a little too narrow for longish in-the-saddle riding; but for trail riding, it works very well. Yes, I was slower than most folks on a road/race bike but I did finish and passed a number of roadies mending a flat tire along the route. Felt like the tortoise from the tortoise and the hare fable. Just my $0.02. PG.

  8. #33
    Its Freakin HammerTime!!! C_Heath's Avatar
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    I ride road and MTB and my fav is whichever im on at the moment. There are times I need to be close to the house (kids, sick wife etc) and ill ride the MTB on the road. It's slow and I can hang my heart on 150 Bpm and be rolling at 9 or 10 mph verses 18 on the road bike. I can ride a hard 90 minutes and get an awesome workout in just a few miles.
    Quote Originally Posted by rousseau View Post
    I don't like any other exercise or sports, really.
    ....

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  9. #34
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    It depends on the gearing, geometry, and tires. Err on the size of a larger frame and your position will be more roadlike. I have a 22" mountain bike with a 28/38/48 front triple and 11-30 rear. On my last two 20+ mile MUP rides I averaged ~16 mph and topped ~23 mph (probably on a good downhill section). The speeds depended more on walker/runner traffic and wind. I pump the tires up to 60 psi so they ride on the center and lock out the front suspension. I think I'll put on a pair of Kenda Cross (maybe a K908 in the back and a K847 in the front) to pick up some speed. I ride for the workout and not for distance so efficiency is not terribly important to me.

    My other mountain bike is shorter and has a 24/34/44 triple in the front and a 14-34 rear. Much more suited for trail climbing. I'd have to pedal around 30-40 percent faster to get to roughly the same speeds as the other bike.

  10. #35
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    I love my road bikes, but my mtb is my go to bike 80% of the time. The roads and weather where I live is crazy and the mtb is a better choice.
    Good advice about buying a larger frame if it is going to be your commuter--road bike--etc.
    I put slicks and a stem riser on mine so the handlebars and seat are level and it is very comfortable (I bought my mtb based on Zinn sizing so it works great on trails but a few minor adjustments makes it road ready).

    It does take a lot more effort to ride at my normal road bike speed but it is a great workout and it will only make you stronger, I easily go 4-5 mph faster on my road bike with the same effort.

    I also no longer cringe and worry that I may have bent a wheel or popped a tire etc., when I encounter something unexpected.
    I actually like the softer ride of the 2" tires..

  11. #36
    Dave Ferris Dave Ferris's Avatar
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    I ride my Ellsworth Truth FS around my hilly neighborhood if I'm short on time and don't wanna put in 25 miles/ 1:35-1:45 on my road Litespeed Classic over to South Pasadena and back. Or have time to ride to the top of the Verdugo mountains in my hood.

    In these newer housing develpoments built into the Verdugo mountains ( ), it's pavement and basically as steep as climbing up the fire road. I don't have the road bike chops to climb those hills on a two ring...very steep.

    It's a great workout in only 30-35 minutes. Gets the heart pumping and you stress less about the steep downhill since you're on hard surface and wide tires with disc brakes.

    Actually as I'm typing this, I wonder why I don't do it more often.

    I'm also campaigning with my better half for a Steve Potts rigid 29er with his famous type II fork. I could see myself riding that exclusively both road and trail.
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  12. #37
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    IMG432.jpg

    Perfect for all day on the road. XC frame with 1.75 slicks. Deore 9 speed and Bmx pedals. Disc brakes are great on a hill or in the wet. I prefer this over a road bike any day of the week.

  13. #38
    Two-Wheeled Aficionado ColinL's Avatar
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    I find dropbars help a lot with wrist and hand fatigue, and sitting with a lower torso angle definitely helps in the wind... of which we have a lot of in Kansas. If you're riding less than 2 hrs though, I don't see that it matters all that much, except that you are going slower on the MTB and therefore covering less ground.

    A mountainbike for commuting would be fine except many of them lack braze-on eyelets for mounting proper racks. (Rear racks that mount only to the seatpost scare the hell out of me.)

    Tires do make a huge difference and what I've found is that you can feel rolling resistance on both pavement and dirt. If you have a slow-rolling, aggressive tire, you don't need to be on a bike path to know that... you should absolutely feel it when you're riding trails too, assuming you are pedaling and not just going straight downhill.

    Mountainbikes do take a ton of the sting out of road issues like potholes. They also aren't very likely to flat if you're tubeless with sealant. Flats are the bane of cycling. I do everything I can to ensure that I can ride when I have time to ride, instead of wasting time with flats.


    I agree with Daspyder that MTBs are the right choice if someone is cursed to have just one bike. A MTB is a FAR better do-it-all than a hybrid, assuming you actually use a MTB on technical trails with rocks, roots, jumps, logs, etc. If you never do any offroad besides smooth gravel, I can see arguments for a cyclocross bike or hybrid (in that order).

  14. #39
    ^ JBC. jbchybridrider's Avatar
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    26er mtb made into a flat bar road bike. It's capable of hanging with road bikes all day. CX fork road gearing 29er wheels weighs 8.1kg


    With CX tires it's capable off road but still fast.
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  15. #40
    Bicycle Repair Man !!! Sixty Fiver's Avatar
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    Moulden XC

    I have ridden this bike on moderately paced centuries and stunned people on road bikes who can't believe a bike running 2.0 tyres can keep up with the skinnies and when the road is not a road it handles all of that really well too... and if the road gets rough I really appreciate the bike even more.

    For rooty singletrack and more challenging trails I have a hardtail that is set up for that but those big squishy tyres don't work nearly as well on the road.

  16. #41
    Senior Member ttusomeone's Avatar
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    What are the trails like that you will be riding? You could always get a cyclocross bike.
    Cat 2 o-meter Road: 0/30 points Cat 2 o-meter CX: 3/15 points
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  17. #42
    Senior Member meanwhile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xlDooM View Post
    lol the mtb forum is awesome nowadays, you can launch a ****storm with any thread

    On topic though: I bought a 29er mtb specifically for my commute. I put big apples on it (is that enough for another ****storm?) and it rides very comfortably, so much so that I am faster on it than on my road bike for the moderate effort level I want to ride at. If you plan on going all-out on every ride, the road bike is superior in my opinion. If you're going to pace yourself and ride moderate speeds, I think the mtb will be far better. The only time I miss my road bike is in wicked headwinds.
    It depends on the bike, effort level, and conditions. I've known people use 90's all-rigid MTBs to time trial on successfully - although they were running skinny tyres and pursuit bars for low air resistance.

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by ttusomeone View Post
    What are the trails like that you will be riding? You could always get a cyclocross bike.
    ..Which would be the same thing with the wonderful restriction of not being able to run fat tyres. Because being able to run a decent size when you need to such a bore - you'll give in to temptation and miss spinning out on gravel climbs and braking your skull riding rock gardens. Yee-ha.

    I ride trails on a crosser myself. And I can definitely tell you that an all-rigid bike with drops, that can take decently wide 26 or 29er tyres, is a much better all-rounder. Crossers are fun, but they are built around tyre width restrictions that are meant to greatly restrict their offroad ability so that riders are forced to run key parts of the course.

  19. #44
    Senior Member ttusomeone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by meanwhile View Post
    ..Which would be the same thing with the wonderful restriction of not being able to run fat tyres. Because being able to run a decent size when you need to such a bore - you'll give in to temptation and miss spinning out on gravel climbs and braking your skull riding rock gardens. Yee-ha.

    I ride trails on a crosser myself. And I can definitely tell you that an all-rigid bike with drops, that can take decently wide 26 or 29er tyres, is a much better all-rounder. Crossers are fun, but they are built around tyre width restrictions that are meant to greatly restrict their offroad ability so that riders are forced to run key parts of the course.
    I completely agree. But the OP made it sound like the majority of his riding would be road/greenway but wanted to be able to try the trails. If you're spending the majority of your time on the road doing 20 mile rides, a cross bike would be much more comfortable than a mtb and he could still cruise the trails with his friends.
    Cat 2 o-meter Road: 0/30 points Cat 2 o-meter CX: 3/15 points
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  20. #45
    Senior Member Mountain Mitch's Avatar
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    So we have learned that, at great cost and effort, you can turn a mountain bike (frame basically) into an ok road bike - at which point it is probably no longer much of a mountain bike....What's the point?

  21. #46
    Senior Member meanwhile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ttusomeone View Post
    I completely agree. But the OP made it sound like the majority of his riding would be road/greenway but wanted to be able to try the trails. If you're spending the majority of your time on the road doing 20 mile rides, a cross bike would be much more comfortable than a mtb and he could still cruise the trails with his friends.
    Maybe we are at cross purposes? Your post was just below 65s, so I took it you were commenting on his bike - which has all the advantages of a crosser and none of the restrictions. Were you replying to the OP instead?

    This is a 90's GT Zaskar MTB that's been droppified:



    ...It's going to be just as aero as a crosser on the road, was probably the most successful hardtail racer ever, and for the weight weenies, Zaskars can pretty easily build up in the 7-8kg range. On a decent trail, the ability to run wider tyres will let it kick the bejayzus out of any crosser ever built. Like 65s bike it's a no drawbacks bike that makes most hybrids - especially most of the upper end supposedly faster (but usually just sillier and more expensive) - look gutless and boring. I'd like to see more events - like gravel blasting - that would encourage this type of bike so they could go mass market.

  22. #47
    Senior Member ttusomeone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by meanwhile View Post
    Maybe we are at cross purposes? Your post was just below 65s, so I took it you were commenting on his bike - which has all the advantages of a crosser and none of the restrictions. Were you replying to the OP instead?
    Yes, sorry I was replying to the OP.
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  23. #48
    Senior Member meanwhile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain Mitch View Post
    So we have learned that, at great cost and effort, you can turn a mountain bike (frame basically) into an ok road bike - at which point it is probably no longer much of a mountain bike....What's the point?
    The point is that you are wrong. The right MTB can have dual use tyres and something like Salsa Bell Laps for bars and be almost as fast as road racing bike on the road, faster than any other bike on some types of trail - this is pretty the ideal gravel bashing bike - and will get by on modern xc trails. A set up like this doesn't even cost much - you buy a nice 90's racing MTB for $300-400, put Bell Laps and friction shifters on it (bar ends maybe) and you are done.

  24. #49
    Senior Member Mountain Mitch's Avatar
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    "A lot depends on the bike and the tires. If you are talking about a F/S bike like the bianchi you mention then I don't think it will ever be a reasonable roader for more than short distances. On the other hand, as people as said here, with the right tires your non-suspended mtn bike can be a reasonable roader with the right tires. A front suspension bike is in between especially if you can cut out the suspension. I think that may be your better option to use on and off road." Mountain Mitch
    "
    The point is that you are wrong. The right MTB can have dual use tyres" meanwhile

    You are saying the exact same thing as I did in my first post on this topic so what are you on about? My point is that conversions, like in post 39 by JBChybridrider, are really just ways to turn a mountain bike into a road bike. And doing that is fine if that's what you like. But they aren't using a MTB as an all rounder by occasionally putting some slicks on it.

  25. #50
    Senior Member meanwhile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain Mitch View Post
    "

    You are saying the exact same thing as I did in my first post on this topic so what are you on about? My point is that conversions, like in post 39 by JBChybridrider, are really just ways to turn a mountain bike into a road bike.
    No, that was not what you wrote. What you wrote that I disagreed with was:

    1. That this is expensive. Nope. It can easily be done very cheaply - I've done so.

    2. That it is pointless. Again, no. You can reasonably get a bike that will perform very well on roads, excel at gravel bashing, and turn in a reasonable performance trail riding.

    3. What you get can be a road bike but doesn't have to be: fat low rolling resistance semi slicks will let you move very fast on the road, but can still be adequate for trail riding as long as you're not going into mud. It's not going to win races (except on the gravel bashing circuit) but it will be able to ride most dry weather trails.

    You might not want a bike like this, but they do have their uses.

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