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-   -   How bad is a mountain bike on the road? (http://www.bikeforums.net/mountain-biking/894964-how-bad-mountain-bike-road.html)

Mountain Mitch 06-20-13 09:48 PM

You have totally lost perspective. This post isn't about YOU or your bike. No doubt you are an expert bike designer, expert builder and expert at getting great inexpensive parts. The point of this forum is to respond to the OP who is none of these things. He and his wife want to START biking. It is ridiculous advice to suggest that he build a one off, half baked, untested design as his first bikes! He wants and needs some real world practical advice - like I and others gave him: get a MTN bike, put slicks on it and it will be an adequate, but not great, road riding bike.

Sixty Fiver 06-20-13 10:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by meanwhile (Post 15764287)
Maybe we are at cross purposes? Your post was just below 65s, so I took it you were commenting on his bike - which has all the advantages of a crosser and none of the restrictions. Were you replying to the OP instead?

This is a 90's GT Zaskar MTB that's been droppified:

http://fcdn.mtbr.com/attachments/gt/...e-p1010677.jpg

...It's going to be just as aero as a crosser on the road, was probably the most successful hardtail racer ever, and for the weight weenies, Zaskars can pretty easily build up in the 7-8kg range. On a decent trail, the ability to run wider tyres will let it kick the bejayzus out of any crosser ever built. Like 65s bike it's a no drawbacks bike that makes most hybrids - especially most of the upper end supposedly faster (but usually just sillier and more expensive) - look gutless and boring. I'd like to see more events - like gravel blasting - that would encourage this type of bike so they could go mass market.

A bike like the Zaskar or a custom built like my Mouldon is usually not what a newer cyclist will be looking for... but does point out the things that separate a mountain bike from a road bike and much of that comes from the tyres and the riding position.

Changing to tyres that are better suited to the road that also have some versatility will make the most difference... I have been running Schwalbe Hurricanes for tens of thousands of miles and used to run an extra set of wheels on my hardtail that were fitted with these tyres for commuting that ran a closer spaced cassette.

Drop bars just improve one's aerodynamics and for many offers the most comfortable riding position.

ColinL 06-20-13 10:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mountain Mitch (Post 15764272)
So we have learned that, at great cost and effort, you can turn a mountain bike (frame basically) into an ok road bike - at which point it is probably no longer much of a mountain bike....What's the point?

:lol:

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mountain Mitch (Post 15766245)
You have totally lost perspective. This post isn't about YOU or your bike. No doubt you are an expert bike designer, expert builder and expert at getting great inexpensive parts. The point of this forum is to respond to the OP who is none of these things. He and his wife want to START biking. It is ridiculous advice to suggest that he build a one off, half baked, untested design as his first bikes! He wants and needs some real world practical advice - like I and others gave him: get a MTN bike, put slicks on it and it will be an adequate, but not great, road riding bike.

:thumb:

You're dead on, but it's far from uncommon for a thread to veer away from the original question / statement that started it. Frankly, I'm disappointed that no one has yet suggested a fatbike as the best do-it-all solution for a new rider.

Sixty Fiver 06-20-13 11:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ColinL (Post 15766364)
You're dead on, but it's far from uncommon for a thread to veer away from the original question / statement that started it. Frankly, I'm disappointed that no one has yet suggested a fatbike as the best do-it-all solution for a new rider.

I love my Pugsley... but it is likely more bike than you need for what the OP describes and a bike that is optimal for the least optimal riding conditions.

zandoval 06-20-13 11:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LesterOfPuppets (Post 15728310)
This was a MTB and will be again someday

Man - What a nice bike...

jbchybridrider 06-21-13 03:14 AM

I'll just describe how my bike came to be and what I like about it regardless of recent discussion and the OP.

I did consider a CX bike but wanted to build my own unique bike. A carbon CX frame at the time cost as much as my total build and there was no disc brake frames at the time.

I don't feel in control off road with drop bars as much as flat bars, my bike is way stiffer than any road or CX bike and stronger, 29er wheels are way stronger than CX wheels and I still have the option of putting 26 inch wheels on with wider tires.
This bike is just as quick on road as a road bike. It turns heads out riding more than a picture on the net making a lot of positive discussions. One time a week before round 1 of the world tour (riders come a month or two early being summer to train on our roads) I got to ride along our coast line with the pro's, I could comfortably ride with them and they loved my bike.
One time on a popular river side bike path a bunch of roadies were tailing me, we were all riding hard till the path ended from repairs. I just powered on through while they had to get off and walk. I never saw them again "funny at the time"
So I would not change my mind about what I have and it's still my favorite rider. But we all have our own preferences and that's OK with me.

EDIT; I also get the odd mtb rider who thinks he can stay with me or pass me, sometimes I let them past then with minimal effort from me while there gasping I ride on past again. It in these situations I can really tell how much faster a modded mtb can be.

Wooden Tiger 06-21-13 05:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mountain Mitch (Post 15764272)
So we have learned that, at great cost and effort, you can turn a mountain bike (frame basically) into an ok road bike - at which point it is probably no longer much of a mountain bike....What's the point?

I totally agree! I swapped the tires on my '12 Cannondale Flash Alloy with hybrid tires and all of a sudden it was no longer a Flash, but a Super Six! :roflmao2:

Repack Rider 06-26-13 06:00 PM

I haven't ridden my "real" road bike (carbon fiber Lemond) in two or three years. I ride my '94 Ritchey P-21 with 1.5" slicks on the road.

formicaman 07-01-13 09:47 PM

Slick tires and bar ends for extra hand positions and a rigid mountain bike will be excellent.

Dilberto 08-21-15 01:59 PM

8.7kg Flatbar CX
 
It's ALL BAD....
http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/k...psiyscxmhs.jpg

ColinL 08-21-15 02:35 PM

I saw that bike quite recently on MTBR... which means... you are under a different username there. I'm not, so I'm easy to find. :)

osco53 08-21-15 02:51 PM

1 Attachment(s)
http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=472383

BikeLite 08-23-15 07:31 PM

If it has two wheels it will work ; ). I only own a mountain bike and mostly ride on the road, including metric century once.

hig4s 08-23-15 08:05 PM

personally I prefer a mountain bike for any type riding. I'm not trying to go fast, if i want to go fast on two wheels I use a motorcycle. My wife has a comfort style road bike, 700c tires and I have a FS 650b MTB. My wife, if we are on the same type bike can't go fast enough for me to get a work out by the distance she is done. I do have to use my high range, top gear to comfortable go as fast as she goes in her high range 3rd gear. But she virtually never goes higher gears than that, she usually runs 10 to 12 mph occasionally 14 or 15mph on flat pavement. I can go 14mph riding an easy pace in top gear, so it works out perfectly for us.

Darth Lefty 08-24-15 11:37 PM

Regardless of thread deadness, I found a ~2mph gain from switching from knobbies to slicks and another ~2mph switching from MTB-with-slicks to road bike. I also found that once I'd changed to the slicks, it made the runout smaller and the ride more efficient, so 48-38-28 rings worked much better than the original 42-32-22 rings. However I've since gotten a proper road bike and changed the MTB back to a MTB.


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