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Old 04-13-05, 12:47 PM   #1
mala
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NRS vs XTC

I recently got back into mountain biking after a few years out by buying a year 2000 rockhopper FSR, but I cant stand the way it bobs on climbs and its so heavy. Therefore im looking for something with a more hardtail feel. One i've looked at is the Giant XTC 3 (uk version) looks nice and looks good value, but i've also heard great things about the NRS system, most people say it does what it promises, ie climbs like a hardtail, it also has a negligible weight difference to the XTC.

What do people think, is it worth the little extra for the rear suspension which seems to have no downside, or can anyone give a reason why the XTC would be better.

I do 40% Road
40% dirt/rocky paths
20% Woodland.
Weigh 190lbs

Cheers.
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Old 04-13-05, 03:21 PM   #2
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First off is your suspension on the FSR setup correctly? I ride a 2003 Rockhopper FSR and Mine doesn't bob in the slightest. Secondly you're comparing a XC race bike with an All-Mountain trail bike. How do you actually intend to ride?
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Old 04-13-05, 03:46 PM   #3
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I have the suspension set as hard as it will go but it's still too soft, the spring is too soft for my weight but i'd rather get a new bike than change the spring.

Sorry for being such a neewbie but I think I need a definition on the difference between cross country and all mountain and exactly what you mean by ''How do you actually intend to ride''?
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Old 04-13-05, 03:49 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by mala
I have the suspension set as hard as it will go but it's still too soft, the spring is too soft for my weight but i'd rather get a new bike than change the spring.

Sorry for being such a neewbie but I think I need a definition on the difference between cross country and all mountain and exactly what you mean by ''How do you actually intend to ride''?
Based on what you put in above go with the NRS. I'm guessing you have a coil spring on your FSR?
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Old 04-13-05, 03:54 PM   #5
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Yes its a coil spring

what types of riding are each of the bikes suited for?
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Old 04-13-05, 05:55 PM   #6
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The current XTC is a hardtail ya know.
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Old 04-13-05, 11:02 PM   #7
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Yes its a coil spring

what types of riding are each of the bikes suited for?
You realize that you can replace that spring a LOT cheaper than getting a new bike right?
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Old 04-14-05, 12:43 AM   #8
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fsr's are inherently bobby- they are designed to bob a bit. upgrading to a stable platform shock will mostly eliminate this. however, with good pedaling technique, you can reduce bob to a minimum (after riding an fsr enduro for 5 years, i can pedal my 6" travel stinky and barely get any bob). smooth spinning, instead of pedaling in squares is far more effective than buying a new bike. and as raiyn said, changing a spring will cost you at most 50 bucks, vs. 2500 for a new bike.
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Old 04-14-05, 12:45 AM   #9
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fsr's are inherently bobby- they are designed to bob a bit. upgrading to a stable platform shock will mostly eliminate this. however, with good pedaling technique, you can reduce bob to a minimum (after riding an fsr enduro for 5 years, i can pedal my 6" travel stinky and barely get any bob). smooth spinning, instead of pedaling in squares is far more effective than buying a new bike. and as raiyn said, changing a spring will cost you at most 50 bucks, vs. 2500 for a new bike.
FSR's are NOT inherently bobby. Far from it. I don't even have a platform shock on mine and it doesn't bob at all while remaining nice and plush.
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Old 04-14-05, 01:09 AM   #10
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My bike is also a bit battered, is quite heavy, and is slightly too small for me. It may be cheaper to get a new spring, but it's not going to solve the other problems.
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Old 04-14-05, 02:55 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by handlebarsfsr
fsr's are inherently bobby- they are designed to bob a bit. upgrading to a stable platform shock will mostly eliminate this. however, with good pedaling technique, you can reduce bob to a minimum (after riding an fsr enduro for 5 years, i can pedal my 6" travel stinky and barely get any bob). smooth spinning, instead of pedaling in squares is far more effective than buying a new bike. and as raiyn said, changing a spring will cost you at most 50 bucks, vs. 2500 for a new bike.
i'v just recently bought a fs bike (coil spring) and, even though i love it, i kinda still miss the pedalling efficiency of a hardtail. can you please expand on your 'good pedalling technique' a bit? i'm interested.
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Old 04-14-05, 09:43 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Raiyn
FSR's are NOT inherently bobby. Far from it. I don't even have a platform shock on mine and it doesn't bob at all while remaining nice and plush.
they dont lock out under pedaling (like the nrs or a high monopivot) is what i meant. there will be some movement from pedaling, and slight as it may be, its still "bob". technique is spinning- getting clipless pedals, and keeping your upper body quiet, not bouncing, and pedaling by both pushing down with one leg, and pulling up on the other, instead of pedaling only on the downstroke. this will negate most of the body motion which promotes pedal bob, and you'll have a stonger pedal stroke too. it takes time to get used to, you have to manually think about pulling up for awhile, after that, it becomes second nature. once you get used to the rear suspension action, a fully is MORE efficient on the trail than a hardtail.
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Old 04-15-05, 12:34 AM   #13
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Thanks. I dont have clippless pedals and i dont think i will, but i'll keep it in mind.
by the way, i'v always wondered, why do they call pedals with clips clipless? I know its probably a stupid question, but i just dont understand.
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Old 04-15-05, 12:38 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by mozzie_marshall
Thanks. I dont have clippless pedals and i dont think i will, but i'll keep it in mind.
by the way, i'v always wondered, why do they call pedals with clips clipless? I know its probably a stupid question, but i just dont understand.
because when they were first invented, the desired way to hold your feet on the pedals were toe clips and straps. because the clipless didnt have those clips haning off of them, they were called clipless. and you can "spin" on platform pedals (or at least be smooth enough to counter act the bob), but its almost impossible to learn to spin without them.
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