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  1. #1
    Member Murcielago's Avatar
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    A few questions from a new guy

    So i'll be moving to the Denver area in the next year and was hoping to get some general information about the types of rides out there and if you don't mind some opinions from people who already live and ride there. I'm in the market to buy a new road bike and was considering the Cannondale Supersix 3 which is about 16lbs or a Cervelo S5 Rival which will be about 17lbs- my question is, do you think the weight penalty of the Cervelo will be too much to live with out there?

    Are most of the weekday group rides in areas that are hilly? I have been riding for a few years and like to do group rides with the racers in my area so they are fast but our hills are short and steep so weight isn't a huge factor where I live. Doing some crit racing is not out of the question for me but when I first move out i'd just be looking for group rides. What kind of terrain do you hit in a 2hr and 4hr ride from Denver or Boulder?

    Also what wheels would you recommend for something like the triple by-pass? Are carbon tubulars ok or is the braking not good enough for the descents?

    Thanks in advance for your info!

  2. #2
    Senior Member Breathegood's Avatar
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    First off: Welcome to the Dever area.

    Second: Unless the engine is already as light as it can be and you really plan on riding competitivly (your post suggests you are not there yet), the difference between a 16lb bike and a 17 or even 18lb bike is negligable IMO. Ride them both and buy the one that is most comfortable for you. If you are not racing, is it more important to be able to say you did the ride on a lighter bike that beats you up, or being able to finish the ride on a heavier bike and still feel like you could keep going? If you are serious about racing, it seems like you would want a bike just for focussed training and events, but you wouldn't necessarily want to ride it all the time.

    Third: Around Denver and Boulder, you can have any kind of ride you want from gentle rolling hills with low relief and brutal winds to long, knarly climbs with wicked fast descents. Denver and its surrounding areas are pretty big. There are lots and lots of groups for every skill level. Start by checking out the local bike shop(s), and you will find the group that's right for you.

    I haven't made the leap to a carbon wheelset just yet, so my opinion is anectdotal, but for riding in the mountains, I would choose a lighter aluminum wheel over a heavier, deep section carbon wheel most of the time. Tire selection is probably just as important as wheel selection.
    1991 Trek 8700 - SS conversion, 2009 Gary Fisher "Kaitai", 2009 Raleigh Team, 2012 Raleigh Twin Six,1996 Cannondale SR500

  3. #3
    Member Murcielago's Avatar
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    Sweet thanks for the info. I don't have much weight to lose right now, i'll probably lose 5lbs when we get deeper in the season but don't really have time to race right now. Many of the guys I ride with are faster then me and do race so i'll get dropped sometimes. This is a pretty common post but I wanted to throw it out there anyway as i've went back and fourth with this decision for a while. Looked at some used bikes too. I'm just going to get the bike that i'm most excited about and like you said, not worry about a pound or two. All the options are better then what I had. It's hard to keep up with guys on 15lb bikes up some of the climbs with my 22lb bianchi.

  4. #4
    Geck, wo ist mein Fahrrad Rx Rider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Murcielago View Post
    What kind of terrain do you hit in a 2hr and 4hr ride from Denver or Boulder?

    bumpy

    Also what wheels would you recommend for something like the triple by-pass? Are carbon tubulars ok or is the braking not good enough for the descents?

    Thanks in advance for your info!
    Colorado weather is quick and sometimes wet, I would stick with alum in case you're caught in a downpour. otherwise they'd be great.
    Breathegood's advice is too spot-on to add much, and a 20lbs bike won't hinder you at all. you shouldn't be racing people up a mountain anyway so don't worry about someone being faster, the mountain is the opponent.
    it's not easy being green. The trees are dying because nobody is hugging them anymore. Go hug a tree.

  5. #5
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    They would be helpful in a race but the TBP isn't a race.
    Anyhow, I'm a 4 and run aluminum wheels as I have larger limiters than my wheels. Mainly that I need more experience.

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