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  1. #1
    Senior Member Seattle Forrest's Avatar
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    New Queen Anne / Myrtle Edwards Bridge (pics)

    WSDOT calls it the West Thomas Street Overpass; it finished in November after what seemed like years of construction.

    The waterfront trail through Myrtle Edwards has always been part of my favorite ride in Seattle. On a clear day, it's unbelievably scenic, with the waves crashing into the rocks nearby, the smell of salt water filling the air, the Olympic Mountains towering over the tidewater, and when you turn that last corner, Mt Rainier standing tall behind the industrial waterway south of downtown. I try to work this into a lot of my rides; after work I do a loop around Lake Union from Ballard and come home through Myrtle Edwards, over Magnolia and across the Locks. On weekends sometimes I go down to Seward Park, and do the last leg of my ride the same way.

    It seems like forever that the bike trail has been closed for bridge construction. We've had to share the pedestrian path, and only the runners were nice enough to use that side path. Anyway, it's been over for a few months, and I wonder what people think of the bridge? Was it worth the wait? Do you think this is a convenient way into Queen Anne?



    Also, I have some pictures. Friday, after work, I loaded up my camera into my backpack, strapped the tripod to the right side of the pack (so I could do traffic checks over the left shoulder), and rode to the bridge. I think I'm allowed to post these here, since they came from a bike ride, even if it was a ride to get some pictures, instead of a more regular ride report?

    Looking toward Myrtle Edwards Park:


    Looking west toward the Olympics from the viewpoint. The jet trails are really unfortunate:


    Coming from the waterfront into Lower Queen Anne:
    Don't believe everything you think.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Medic Zero's Avatar
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    Nice post and pictures!

    I appreciate the info about this trail, for some reason I have yet to explore it and just earlier this week I was considering adding it to a loop ride.

    May I suggest adding the pictures to the "Beautiful NW" thread as well?
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  3. #3
    Senior Member Seattle Forrest's Avatar
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    Thanks for the reminder. Sticky threads can turn invisible...

    I prefer taking the waterfront trail going north, and I'm not sure why. It's what I've mostly always done.

    My favorite "way in" is from Victor Steinbruek Park, just north of Pike's Place; you take Western for a few blocks until it splits, veer left slightly onto Elliot, stay in the left lane, then go left on Broad, and take a right at the fountain into Myrtle Edwards. It can be really pretty to take Alaskan all through downtown but it's unbelievably crowded, and if you're trying to get somewhere, it can be frustrating. Good people watching, though.

    Also if you're crossing downtown north/south, this (the longer route, over Alaskan) can avoid a lot of the traffic madness and also a lot of the hills.
    Don't believe everything you think.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Medic Zero's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seattle Forrest View Post
    Thanks for the reminder. Sticky threads can turn invisible...

    I prefer taking the waterfront trail going north, and I'm not sure why. It's what I've mostly always done.

    My favorite "way in" is from Victor Steinbruek Park, just north of Pike's Place; you take Western for a few blocks until it splits, veer left slightly onto Elliot, stay in the left lane, then go left on Broad, and take a right at the fountain into Myrtle Edwards. It can be really pretty to take Alaskan all through downtown but it's unbelievably crowded, and if you're trying to get somewhere, it can be frustrating. Good people watching, though.

    Also if you're crossing downtown north/south, this (the longer route, over Alaskan) can avoid a lot of the traffic madness and also a lot of the hills.
    Ah! Good point! I have a few friends I visit to the south of downtown and I live in Greenwood. I've been in the habit of taking Interlaken to Lake Washington Boulevard, but for visiting my friend near the airport I could take the trail along Myrtle Edwards and then 1st Ave South. It'd be more direct and give me a chance to visit the Locks on the way.
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  5. #5
    or tarckeemoon, depending marqueemoon's Avatar
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    I think it's cool. It would certainly make living on lower QA a lot more appealing to me.

    What I'm not wild about is the city doing stuff like this while the Ballard Bridge continues its decline. It is a truly scary place to ride a bicycle.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Seattle Forrest's Avatar
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    I hate the Ballard Bridge. The lane for cyclists is more or less shoulder width. The new bridge (the one this thread is about) must be ten feet wide or more, and you notice the contrast right away. I also hate that if you want to get from B'lard to Nickerson, the best way to go is on the 'wrong' side of the bridge so you don't have to cross 15th on the other end. So when you're going the right way, you always have to deal with that one guy. It's too narrow to pass while both cyclists are moving.

    I don't take the Ballard Bridge with my bike anymore. It's only a couple miles either to the Fremont Bridge, or the Locks.
    Don't believe everything you think.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Medic Zero's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seattle Forrest View Post
    I hate the Ballard Bridge. The lane for cyclists is more or less shoulder width. The new bridge (the one this thread is about) must be ten feet wide or more, and you notice the contrast right away. I also hate that if you want to get from B'lard to Nickerson, the best way to go is on the 'wrong' side of the bridge so you don't have to cross 15th on the other end. So when you're going the right way, you always have to deal with that one guy. It's too narrow to pass while both cyclists are moving.

    I don't take the Ballard Bridge with my bike anymore. It's only a couple miles either to the Fremont Bridge, or the Locks.
    Yeah, I used to live in Magnolia and only tried taking the Ballard Bridge twice before deciding it was too much of a hassle, if not outright dangerous. As much as I love the Locks on foot though, it's a pain to go through there with your bike when it is full of tourists and its hours can be somewhat limiting. On the other hand, thanks to this thread I just discovered the path* that leads from Magnolia to the Fremont Bridge. That is one nice path! I was able to cruise along in a high gear the entire distance of it, with the only exception being the zig-zag across the railroad tracks. The tarmac is smooth, and no one was on it. The light industrial is interesting old boatyards and then you are on the canal path. It was the longest stretch of uninterrupted cruising I've had since my last short tour when I was out in the boonies. So nice!

    * Emerson Street Path to the Ship Canal Trail
    ISO: 22" GT Rebound frame, year 2000 model

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