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Thread: Green River

  1. #1
    Center of the Universe ngateguy's Avatar
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    Green River

    My Brother and I are planning out annual trek to Kent to enjoy lunch at the Caveman. I am just wondering if the Green River Trail is still blocked or have they opened it back up yet?
    Matthew 6

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    Removal started last summer and they were supposed to be done by September, but I've not been down there personally. You might have a look at the King County Parks website.

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    It's open.
    Seek: Early 80's Mountain Goat Bar/Stem Combo.

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    John Wayne Toilet Paper nhluhr's Avatar
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    They removed the sandbags at least at the northern end. I saw a notice on my office building's door notifying that they had halted work for the rainy season (this was late last fall). Should be all done by now.

    (clarification: my office sits right on the trail at the northernmost end of where the sandbags were placed... for a long time my commute involved a sleek CX dismount up the dirt embankment to circumvent the bags)

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    Senior Member Medic Zero's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nhluhr View Post
    They removed the sandbags at least at the northern end. I saw a notice on my office building's door notifying that they had halted work for the rainy season (this was late last fall). Should be all done by now.

    (clarification: my office sits right on the trail at the northernmost end of where the sandbags were placed... for a long time my commute involved a sleek CX dismount up the dirt embankment to circumvent the bags)


    GOOD NEWS! I've been waiting for them to remove all those giant HESCO barriers for what seems like forever. I have a friend that lives at Angle Lake that I cycle down to visit several times a year and have yet to be able to take the trail.

    In fact, this Sunday I'm headed down there, I'll get to see how it is between Marginal way and South 180th Street. EDIT, actually, looking at the map, I think I may stick with the trail all the way down to South 200th, the ascent to the west looks more bike friendly there.

    Thanks for the news!
    Last edited by Medic Zero; 05-10-13 at 10:50 PM.
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    Senior Member Medic Zero's Avatar
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    .

    I'm looking at riding from Puyallup back to north Seattle on Sunday, just wanted to confirm that all of the trail is open. Google seems to be calling part of the route I've selected Hawley Road, South 251st Street, and Frager Road, when it is showing my route on the Green River Trail...?
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    Center of the Universe ngateguy's Avatar
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    The trail was open when we did our ride a couple of months ago.
    Matthew 6

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    Is all open. Been that way since around spring. In Kent they have been doing some repaving of some sections which has shut down sections of the trail on the weekends. But for past month its been open.

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    Senior Member Medic Zero's Avatar
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    Excellent! Good news for everyone, but I'm quite pleased too, as I'm picking up a bike from a Craigslist seller in Puyallap tomorrow and am hoping to ride it home to north Seattle and I haven't had a chance to explore those trails!

    Thanks for the info everyone!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Medic Zero View Post
    Excellent! Good news for everyone, but I'm quite pleased too, as I'm picking up a bike from a Craigslist seller in Puyallap tomorrow and am hoping to ride it home to north Seattle and I haven't had a chance to explore those trails!

    Thanks for the info everyone!
    Hope you got your bike and all went fine.

    Could someone tell me where this bike trail is as I live in Bonney Lake not far from Puyallup and would like to ride it. Is it a paved trail or a dirt trail? I have a road bike so that will make the difference. I really need to find some new trails to ride as the Orting Trail is about all I ride and while it is nice I am getting really tired of the same trail.

    So any help on trail in the Sumner, Puyallup, Bonney Lake area would be appreciated for a road bike.

    Thanks for the help and I hope Medic Zero you had a great ride home on your new bike.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Medic Zero's Avatar
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    I'll post a comprehensive write up here in the hopes it will help you get out on these trails! I just got home, and I have to say I am envious of you folks down south, two great trails, totally flat, courteous families and other bikers, really what's not to love?!

    I write it up sometime between later tonight and my overnight shift Monday night. I used a combination of the Interurban Trail from its southern terminus and the Green River Trail where it meets it more or less. I just use google maps directions feature with the cycling overlay turned on and liberally zoom in to "streetview" so that landmarks look familiar and so I can choose between competing routes. I just use cue sheets and a map when I am out on the road, but I really appreciate the satellite, camera truck, and camera cyclists for providing these resources.

    Soooo glad they finally removed all those giant sandbags and let us have the trail back!
    ISO: 22" GT Rebound frame, year 2000 model

  12. #12
    Senior Member Medic Zero's Avatar
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    FWIW, here's the cue sheet I made up, going from Pioneer Park in Puyallap, through Sumner, onto the Interurban and then the Green River trails. I'm still fine tuning my preferred routes from where this cue sheet ends to where the bike path along Alaskan in Seattle picks up.


    go EAST on trail through park north of City Hall

    LEFT onto 2nd St. SE for 3 blocks

    RIGHT onto MAIN St. for 1 block

    LEFT onto 2nd St. NE for 1 block

    RIGHT onto 2nd AVE NE for 0.4 mi

    entrance to bike trail on LEFT right before the bridge

    follow riverfront trail to the NE for 1.8 miles

    couple of picnic tables along river here

    follow trail NE to the RIGHT at bridge

    ride sidewalk South past Mama Stortina’s restaurant

    cross street, head North, take sidewalk over bridge (turns out the right lane was parking and there's a door zone I took instead)

    stay on sidewalk over second bridge

    arterial is variously: Inter/Main/Linden through here

    continue on TRAFFIC St. for 0.4 mi

    TRAFFIC St. becomes FRYAR AVE 0.6 mi

    AM/PM mini mart here (map!Gatorade, water, snax)

    LEFT after power sub-station & storage tanks onto trail over bridge

    follow 142nd AVE around to the NE for 1.7 miles

    LEFT to STAY on 142nd AVE E. at the "T" (The street sign read something different here, from what Google said it was, but I was oriented from having familiarized myself with the map, satellite photos, and "Street View".)

    LEFT onto 24th St. SE for one block

    RIGHT onto 140th AVE E. for 0.5 mi

    LEFT onto 16th St. E. for 0.2 mi

    continue onto NYBERG for 0.1 mi

    RIGHT onto 136th AVE E. for 0.2 mi

    continue onto VALENTINE AVE SE for 0.9 mi

    as road enters new development, trail on LEFT

    just after yellow arrow sign (left);

    follow trail through traffic circle & into (Rhubarb) park

    when trail meets street come out into street

    RIGHT between homes onto CHICAGO BLVD .3 mi (I'm not sure this is viable, the satellite view showed a gap between houses that looked like it was going to be developed into a path, but I missed a turn a couple of blocks before and bypassed this. I'm actually curious about it. It could well be a paved path, or it could be weeds between the two houses of the new development.

    LEFT onto 3rd AVE SW for 0.3 miles

    RIGHT just p 3rd Pl. SW onto the

    INTERURBAN Trail for about 7.5 mi

    after 262nd, go straight over blue & white bridge

    immediate (switchback) LEFT after crossing bridge (@ blue signs)

    (just before crossing 167 - Cycle Therapy)

    (703 Central Ave S, Kent,253854-7487)

    HAWLEY Rd trail under HWY 16

    north on Hawley Road, just after plum trees, turn;

    LEFT onto trail and go under overpass (68th AVE S)

    HAWLEY Rd becomes S 251st (on trail adjacent?)

    take trail bridge (LEFT) just after the green trestle bridge

    immediate RIGHT onto FRAGER Rd. for 1.9 miles

    RIGHT (EAST) over rust colored bridge, just past power lines stretching over trail and river

    Immediate LEFT onto RUSSELL Rd (trail here?)

    Nature area just past here, restrooms in park

    bear left onto GREEN River Trail

    LEFT over brown wooden bridge, then RIGHT onto trail

    follow GREEN RIVER TRAIL ~1 mi

    (Performance Bike 351 Strander Blvd 206575-6872)

    (REI 240 Andover Pk W Tukwila 206248-1938)

    onto STARFIRE to cross river

    immediate RIGHT onto trail

    RIGHT, back under STARFIRE bridge

    follow trail for half a mile

    over river on rusty ped bridge

    trail becomes sidewalk along INTERURBAN AVE

    back on trail @ piano store, just before overpass

    follow trail ~3 miles

    trail goes under Pac Hwy, loops,

    take north sidewalk on Pacific Hwy

    over river, immediate LEFT

    after crossing river onto trail;

    1/4 mile later, cross river on pedestrian bridge

    after less than 1/2 mi on trail:

    RIGHT onto 102nd

    cross the Green River one last time!

    immediate LEFT onto NORFOLK

    LEFT onto AIRPORT WAY

    LEFT onto PERIMETER

    before/at RUBY CHOW PARK:

    RIGHT 15th AVE S. for 98'

    continue onto STANLEY for 0.2 mi

    RIGHT onto 13th for 233'

    LEFT onto AIRPORT for 0.4 mi

    LEFT onto LUCILE for 0.6 mi

    (just before overpass)

    RIGHT onto 1st AVE S. for 1.5 mi

    LEFT onto HANFORD

    RIGHT onto E. MARGINAL


    I'll post a better write up later, but I thought the above might help.
    ISO: 22" GT Rebound frame, year 2000 model

  13. #13
    Senior Member Medic Zero's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Midnight Shadow View Post
    Hope you got your bike and all went fine.

    Could someone tell me where this bike trail is as I live in Bonney Lake not far from Puyallup and would like to ride it. Is it a paved trail or a dirt trail? I have a road bike so that will make the difference. I really need to find some new trails to ride as the Orting Trail is about all I ride and while it is nice I am getting really tired of the same trail.

    So any help on trail in the Sumner, Puyallup, Bonney Lake area would be appreciated for a road bike.

    Thanks for the help and I hope Medic Zero you had a great ride home on your new bike.
    Forgot to add that it is all paved trail, totally suitable for a road bike. Hopefully I'll get to write up a trip report tonight. I'm stuck in an assignment that is zero work and all standby time tonight, but I'm also stuck on a mobile computer that is ancient, unupdated, and only a terminal (not a full box). It keeps crashing, and I can't even compose in Hotmail as is my usual practice as it won't even let me open my individual messages there! O.o
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    Thanks so much for the directions. I will be trying them. I most likely will hit it somewhere around Mama Stortina’s restaurant since I live in Bonney Lake or I might hit it at the second bridge by the Old Canary as that would be a good place for me to park.

    I look forward to your write up. This has been really helpful. I plan to print it and start trying to figure it out later this week when I get to ride again. I will be working Tuesday and Wednesday of this week so I will not be able to ride at all. My next possibility will be either Thursday or Friday.

    So what bike did you go to Puyallup to get Medic Zero? I ride a Trek 1800c with a few modifications like different cassette and a mountain back derailer. Helps me go up hills better since I can not get my heart rate over 104.

    Thanks again for the information Medic Zero.
    Midnight Shadow

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    This is the route I take to get connect from the Pioneer Trail to the Interurban. I have ridden it in during all hours of the day and a few times before sunrise
    http://goo.gl/maps/coMnK

  16. #16
    Senior Member Medic Zero's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ravenhog View Post
    This is the route I take to get connect from the Pioneer Trail to the Interurban. I have ridden it in during all hours of the day and a few times before sunrise
    http://goo.gl/maps/coMnK
    Nice! Our routes are nearly identical from where the OP wants to start to where you turn north on Milwaukee. I kept going a few blocks further to the northwest to get over onto the Interurban trail one mile sooner. I'd be curious to hear if you have tried 140th instead of 138th/137th and if the latter is better? 140th was a quiet tree-lined industrial street when I went down it. It has a turn lane down the middle so any traffic should be able to overtake you safely, but it also has wide sidewalks on both sides of the street. In fact, the sidewalk on the west side of the street looked like it was MUP width.

    Regarding my cue sheet posted above, ignore the references to bike shops, I wanted to know where the nearest bike shops to my route were in case I had any problems with the bike I had just picked up from a Craigslist seller. None of those bike shops are directly on the route I gave, but where they appear in the cue sheet is where I would diverge from it to go to one of them if I needed to. I actually went to Bonney Lake Bicycle Shop of Sumner early in my ride and they were super nice and helpful. Highly recommended. Also, where my cue sheet says "cross the Green river one last time" is where I exited the trail and started working my way through industrial areas towards Alaskan Way. The Green River Trail extends just a little further beyond that if one stays on it. If you follow my cue sheet it will take you to the Boeing Museum of Flight, and you can ride around the outside of it and check out a number of interesting aircraft. Just before the museum is Randy's restaurant, which on the inside is like a teenage boys dream bedroom, as it is filled with model aircraft hanging from the ceiling and all the booths have neat coffee table aircraft books. The buffalo burger there is pretty good!

    BTW, what I picked up was a 1994 GT Corrado. Eventually, when I have the time and funds this will be built up into my commuter, replacing my low-end 1993 GT Outpost that has been serving admirably in these duties. I love old steel GT mountain bikes, but the Outpost is a little heavy and I suspect it has a hi-tensile rear triangle, it doesn't ride as nice as I'd like. It has done a fantastic job for me, to the tune of about 100 miles a week commuting and on longer rides, including an over-nighter to a bed and breakfast and regular 35 mile days, but I had been keeping an eye out for something similar, but with nicer tubing. The Corrado was the last of the high end steel frames that came from the factory for GT, although for a few years after you could order another model custom from their shop. Aluminum supplanted steel for all the nicer bikes the next year. Suffice it to say, I'm stoked to finally have a nice bike! Even if it is 20 years old, and has obviously seen a lot of miles. I'll end up replacing nearly everything on it anyway, it is the frame that I'm most interested in, although it came with an interesting mix of high end components. It's lighter than I thought a steel framed mountain bike could be which I assume is due to the double butted Tange tubes and the triple-butted GT Bologna Lite fork. It also has the vaunted GT "groove tube" which is a first for us (my girlfriend and I) despite having a fleet of six GT's at the moment and having had another before it was stolen.

    I'm in the middle of typing up my ride report. Should have it done tonight.
    Last edited by Medic Zero; 09-05-13 at 10:37 PM.
    ISO: 22" GT Rebound frame, year 2000 model

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    Quote Originally Posted by Medic Zero View Post
    I'd be curious to hear if you have tried 140th instead of 138th/137th and if the latter is better? 140th was a quiet tree-lined industrial street when I went down it. It has a turn lane down the middle so any traffic should be able to overtake you safely, but it also has wide sidewalks on both sides of the street. In fact, the sidewalk on the west side of the street looked like it was MUP width.

    I actually went to Bonney Lake Bicycle Shop of Sumner early in my ride and they were super nice and helpful. Highly recommended.
    From all my rides through there I have found 138th/137TH has less truck traffic vs 140th. I have noticed the wide sidewalks also but I personally like riding on the road where the truck drivers are normally looking for cross traffic.


    I know Paul, Bob, and Steve at Bonney lake bike shop well. Steve does great work if your in need of a good mechanic.

  18. #18
    Senior Member Medic Zero's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Midnight Shadow View Post
    I look forward to your write up. This has been really helpful. I plan to print it and start trying to figure it out later this week when I get to ride again.

    Okay, still haven't finished writing up my ride report, as I'm very wordy, a perfectionist, and it was a long ride!

    Here's the relevant portion, from Mama Stortini's Restaurant, north to the Interurban, to the Green River, to its northern terminus. If anyone's interested, I'll post a link to my much disused blog and have the rest of the ride report posted over there in the next few days.

    ...

    I was pleased to find that the first bridge over the Puyallup River had room for me. On Google Street View it showed two lanes of traffic each direction, and I was expecting to have to take a lane over the bridge. When I reached the street leading up to it though, I was surprised to find cars parked all along the right hand lane, and the lane was wide enough for me to ride alongside them in it. I was in the door zone, but there wasn't any activity in and out of the cars, so I left the one traffic lane to automobiles and rode over the bridge in the door zone. I suspect that at rush hours this lane is open to traffic and that is what the Google camera car captured on Street View.

    The second bridge is actually on overpass crossing Highway 410, here I actually took the sidewalk, a rarity for me, but traffic was heavy and there weren't any pedestrians. While I hadn't changed directions or turned off the street I was on at all, it had changed names multiple times. Just the other side of the Puyallup River, in front of Mama Stortini's Restaurant it was East Main Avenue, for about a block it was "Inter Avenue East", then Main again, then Linden Drive East, and then finally Traffic Avenue after it passes the 410 cloverleaf. As far as cloverleafs go, it was the easiest I've ever crossed on a bike, really quite civilized.

    As Traffic Street crosses where Sumner's Main Street turns into Bridge Street, Traffic becomes Fryar Avenue. It should be illegal to have four two streets have eight names in less than three quarters of a mile, but there you go. Fryar Avenue is pleasant, with a decent bike lane and had to have been a far superior choice to riding along the West Valley Highway (167), which is what Google suggested and is shown as being the bike route on their map. The route I had chosen also had the advantage of being flat as a pancake, all the way to Magnolia in Seattle, whereas it looks like the Highway 167 travels along low rolling hills at the edge of the valley there. They don't look like bad hills at all, and there is a bike lane there, but I was stuck in my biggest chain-ring (even if it is just a 42 tooth) and I had a long ways to go.

    Just after passing a small power sub-station and some storage tanks and before Fryar Avenue makes a bend and turns into Tacoma Avenue there is a funny little bridge that has a single lane of traffic eastbound with only a sidewalk/bike lane leading the other way. I crossed the Green River for the first time here. This puts you onto 142nd Avenue East, which "T"'s into: 142 Avenue East! Actually this is right where Tacoma Avenue turns into 142nd Avenue East, so if you turn left from 142nd onto 142nd you'll be headed the right way! Sometimes I have to wonder if anywhere else has as confusing street nomenclature as Washington State. At the time all I noticed was the street sign said something different from what I expected it to, but I knew which way to turn from familiarizing myself with the maps.

    142nd doesn't have a bike lane, but it does have two lanes in each direction. I settled into the right lane for the next mile and a third and kept an eye on my mirror, but the little bit of traffic I experienced passed courteously and early in the other lane. I position myself in about the lefthand wheel track in situations like this so it is unambiguous that cars will have to change lanes to pass, so that might have helped some. No problems here, unlike Seattle, I experienced level ground and good asphalt for almost every inch of my journey until I crossed the Green River for the last time near Boeing Field. It was so nice traveling on well maintained roads!

    142nd T's into 24th Street East. While there is a river front trail a block to the east, it only runs for half a mile and I would've ended up going a couple of blocks out of my way to take it, so I skipped it and went one block west to 140th Avenue East on 24th. Heading north along 140th was pleasant, although it is a light industrial kind of area, the street is tree-lined, there is a center turn lane down the length of it so cars can safely pass you, and each side of the street has very wide sidewalks. In fact, the sidewalk on the west side of the street looked wide enough to be a Multi Use Path, although it is not designated as such on the map. 140th Avenue East T's into 16th Street, which promptly changes names as it crosses over the railroad tracks a whole block down, becoming Nyberg Road East. 16th/Nyberg is a two lane street (one each direction) with no shoulder, but I was only on it for three tenths of a mile and it didn't have any traffic on the Sunday of Labor Day Weekend.

    Hanging a right onto 136th Avenue East, I was northbound again. Another two lane street (one each direction), it mostly has a shoulder northbound and a bike lane southbound, but given the lack of traffic and my great mirror, I took the lane for the two tenths of a mile I was on it. There's a stop light at a street whose sign said Stewart as I approached from the south. Google variously calls this street either 8th Street East or Stewart Road East, depending on what zoom level you happen to be at. A phenomenon I discovered researching this trip that I hadn't noticed before that manifested itself on a number of streets. Not something that inspires confidence!

    After I finally got through this light, I noticed there was a gas station with a mini-mart a little up the road I was crossing, so I made a u-turn and detoured over to it for Gatorade, water, a Payday candy bar and to use their air compressor. I didn't think that light was ever going to trigger for me and was considering running it when I noticed a car approaching behind me in my rearview mirror and so just waited for them to trigger the light. I'd swear that it is national law that gas stations need to provide air and water free, but I think I've always had to pay for it. At this Chevron station it was a dollar, but I was loaded down with plenty of quarters in advance. This particular compressor had a sticker on it saying part of the proceeds went to some charity, which I don't have great confidence in, but whatever.

    After eating my Payday, drinking some of the Gatorade and a lot of water and with my tires closer to where I wanted them I set out again. I had trouble getting the air compressor to fill my tires, one more than the other. A lot of times the nozzle on these has been run over and is out of round and is hard to get a good seal on the tighter tolerances of a Presta-Schrader adapter compared to a cars tire. I think that is what was going on here. Another reason drilling out all of my rims to take Schrader tubes is on my to do list! I rarely use gas station compressors, but inevitably, when you do need to use one, you really need to use it! My tires had been feeling pretty bouncy and splashy down at about 50 PSI each, they were better at about 80 for the rear and 60 for the front, which was all I could manage with the compressor, but they still weren't where I wanted them. At least most of the bouncy bucking when I went over large bumps or pedaled hard was gone.

    At some point in the less than a third of a mile since I had turned onto 136th it had changed names and become Valentine Avenue SE, and so that is what I turned back onto after my detour to the service station. After traveling on Valentine for nearly a mile the road enters a new development and a trail is on the left, just past a diamond shaped yellow road sign with a left arrow on it. I missed this, despite knowing it was there, and having the clue of the county line sign and County Line Road signalling the new development. I noticed the two former, but somehow didn't notice that I was among the new buildings until I was already nearing 5th Avenue NE. I knew that this paralleled the route I was going to take, so I just turned left onto 5th, rather than backtracking.

    The trail I missed goes between the new buildings for a block and then through an intersection and across (around) a traffic circle and into Rhubarb Park. When the trail through the park nears the street to the north you will be near a small path between two of the buildings. This path puts you out onto Chicago Boulevard. This looked like a pleasant way to go, but not worth circling back for once I missed it. I'm not 100% sure this is viable, the satellite view showed a gap between houses that looked like it was going to be developed into a path, but I missed a turn a couple of blocks before and bypassed this. I'm actually curious about it. It could well be a paved path, or it could be weeds between the two houses of the new development.

    After travelling down Chicago Boulevard for three tenths of a mile, turn left onto 3rd Avenue SW for another three tenths of a mile to get onto the Interurban Trail at its southern terminus, just past 3rd Place SW. There is a gravel lot here, presumably for people who drive their bikes to the trail. The trail leads north for a little over seven and half miles. This is all paved trail, about one car wide. There is at least one covered picnic shelter, but for the most part, being a power line right of way there aren't any trees, so on a hot, sunny day it was a little tough and a little bleak. Between being fatigued from working all night and still being up hours later, and not being used to the sun, my face was starting to hurt from squinting, despite my prescription sunglasses.

    The Interurban Trail is just fine, but not terribly interesting or pleasant. It's nice to be separated from traffic and to be able to pedal along, but most of the route is along the backsides of industrial areas. All the street crossings except 15th Street NW and 277th Street are at grade, but they are quiet streets (between its southern terminus where I started and where I exited when it met up with the Green River trail, I don't know about street crossings on the Interurban north of there). For a wonder, there is actually a street sign where the path intersects 262nd, which is the last street before you diverge from the Interurban and cross over to the Green River Trail. One of my great frustrations with the Interurban running north out of Seattle is that most of the streets you cross on the trail are a mystery as there are no street signs posted!

    Just after 262nd you will cross over the Green River on a aqua or teal and white colored bridge. As soon as you cross over the bridge take the hard switchback left (just past the blue signs). Google calls this Hawley Road, but it appeared to be the beginning of the Green River Trail to me. It runs west along the river and then passes under Highway 167. Then it turns to the north and follows the river. Google shows just a road and the HESCO barriers (like giant sandbags) all through here. I honestly can't recall, but I know the HESCO barriers have been removed and I don't remember the road, so I think there is now a proper trail all through here now.

    After the trail goes under the overpass at 68th Avenue South it will briefly be on South 251st Street. Right after this there will be a small traffic circle with an apartment complex to the right and the entrance to the trail on the left of the traffic circle. The trail here is very nice and follows the river for a while (about two miles). As you pass the golf driving range you will see a green trestle bridge. Just the other side of this is another bridge for trail users. Take this across the Green River again.

    After crossing over the bridge, take the immediate right onto Frager Road and follow it for almost two miles. At first, for a short way this is a public road, but it sees very little traffic. Shortly after passing the golf course it has bollards across it, restricting traffic to trail users and becomes a really nice ride alongside the river. I'm super envious of people that have access to this nice stretch of trail here.

    Just shy of the two mile mark you'll see some power lines stretching over the trail and over the river. Right after this there is a rust colored bridge you want to take to cross over the river again. Take the immediate left on to Russell Road. The road will fork at what looks like a cement World War 2 "dragons tooth" tank obstacle. If you bear left here you will be back on the trail. If you stay to the right, Russell Road takes you past a large green area to the east with some raised observation towers for bird watching. To the west is a park with bathrooms. If you did bear to the right and stayed on Russell Road, the trail curves around and meets it at the end of the parks there.

    The trail follows alongside the river for a pleasant nearly three miles after the parks (Van Doren's Landing Park & Playground, Anderson Park and the nature area to the east). Cross the river once again on the brown wooden bridge and follow the trail to the north along the west bank of the Green River. After two and half miles you will cross under two overpasses. Following the trail for another half mile around a bend in the river will bring you to Starfire Way and its bridge, which you will have to use to cross the river once again. As soon as you've crossed the river, follow the trail to the right where it will loop around under the bridge you just crossed over and continue as the Green River Trail once again. Shortly you will come to yet another bridge, cross over the river again on the rusty pedestrian bridge.

    After about a mile from the Starfire bridge the trail will dump you out onto the sidewalk of Interurban Avenue at some casinos. Here you will have to ride the (wide) sidewalk for about three quarters of a mile. Just past (not before!) the piano store, and just before the big overpass, the trail will pick up again on the right. The trail runs for another three and half miles from here, but I've always gotten off it at 115th or Pacific Highway, so I can't really tell you what that last mile is like. The part of it I have ridden, is like almost all of the rest of the Green River Trail that I have been on, a nice ride alongside the river, on a wide path that is mostly deserted and whose users are almost uniformly courteous. Very nice!

    It seems crazy to cross the river so many times, but the trail isn't continuous on either side of the river, but it's not actually bad. I did a lot of research determining which bridges to take to keep me on the trail and not have to cross on a busy arterial street either in a traffic lane or on the sidewalk. That's why I took care to note the appearance of each bridge and some landmarks right before each one. There are several other crossings that I ignored.
    Last edited by Medic Zero; 09-07-13 at 04:23 AM.
    ISO: 22" GT Rebound frame, year 2000 model

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