Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Professional Cycling For the Fans Follow the Tour de France,the Giro de Italia, the Spring Classics, or other professional cycling races? Here's your home...

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 09-09-17, 06:50 PM   #1
adele87
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Bikes:
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Question

What's the difference between Track and Road Cycling?
adele87 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-17, 07:21 PM   #2
MinnMan
Senior Member
 
MinnMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Minneapolis
Bikes: 2016 Masi cxgr, 2011 Felt F3 Ltd, 2010 Trek 2.1, 2009 KHS Flite 220, 1991 Bianchi Osprey
Posts: 2,440
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 225 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by adele87 View Post
What's the difference between Track and Road Cycling?
thigh circumference

Last edited by MinnMan; 09-09-17 at 07:26 PM.
MinnMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-17, 08:06 AM   #3
colombo357
Senior Member
 
colombo357's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Murica
Bikes: Specialized Roubaix Expert Di2, Santa Cruz Hightower C S
Posts: 2,014
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by adele87 View Post
What's the difference between Track and Road Cycling?
Track and field is a sport which includes athletic contests established on the skills of running, jumping, and throwing. The name is derived from the sport's typical venue: a stadium with an oval running track enclosing a grass field where the throwing and jumping events take place.

Road cycling is the most widespread form of cycling. It includes recreational, racing, and utility cycling. Road cyclists are generally expected to obey the same rules and laws as other vehicle drivers or riders and may also be vehicular cyclists.
colombo357 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-17, 11:14 AM   #4
dabac
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 6,999
Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 519 Post(s)
Track cycling is done on an oval, banked track using fixed gear bikes with drop bars and no brakes.

Road cycling is done on roads, usually on bikes with brakes, several gears and the ability to coast.
dabac is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-17, 09:46 AM   #5
atbman
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Leeds UK
Bikes:
Posts: 2,039
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Info on the two disciplines on the attached web pages from British Cycling' site. they include videos and brief explanations.

I'm assuming that you're very new to cycling. People on this site are usually pretty helpful to newbies, usually. I was once pretty sarcastic to a newcomer like you and have regretted it ever since.

https://www.britishcycling.org.uk/ge...adcycling?c=EN
https://www.britishcycling.org.uk/ge...ckcycling?c=EN

Ignore Columbo357. He either didn't understand your question or he was being rather sarky/patronising
atbman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-17, 09:48 AM   #6
adele87
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Bikes:
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Track cycling is done on an oval, banked track using fixed gear bikes with drop bars and no brakes. Road cycling is done on roads, usually on bikes with brakes, several gears and the ability to coast.


I am glad someone got what I was asking. I know in the olympics there is both track cycling and road cycling, and they are different areas in which one can compete. I really enjoy watching track personally. They seem like the skill set in which to ride might be similar. But since the track is often on a slated oval, I would imagine it takes a lot of skill.

I'm assuming that you're very new to cycling. People on this site are usually pretty helpful to newbies, usually. I was once pretty sarcastic to a newcomer like you and have regretted it ever since.

I think it depends on what you mean by new to cycling. I have been biking since I was 8. In college, I bought my first bike store bike and used it to commute to class every day to save money on gas. I am just starting to get interested in biking as a sport/form of exercise, it hasn't been something I was interested in before. In the past I mostly used it as transportation. I hope that makes sense.

Last edited by adele87; 09-13-17 at 09:52 AM. Reason: put quotes in
adele87 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-17, 10:02 AM   #7
caloso
Packfodding 3
 
caloso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Sacramento, California, USA
Bikes: Ridley Excalibur, Gazelle Champion Mondial, On-One Pompino, Specialized Rock Hopper
Posts: 35,452
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 767 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by dabac View Post
Track cycling is done on an oval, banked track using fixed gear bikes with drop bars and no brakes.

Road cycling is done on roads, usually on bikes with brakes, several gears and the ability to coast.
USAC requires bikes in road events to have two brakes. I assume UCI does too.
caloso is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-17, 10:42 AM   #8
adele87
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Bikes:
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
It'd be cool to race someday, but I am spending time currently on just learning to ride my new bike. I rode a 2008 Fuji Nevada 4.0 in college that I still have, but it's so old I decided I need one to fit what I'm using biking for now. The Fuji I used as a commuter, and weather where I lived in college was often cold and rainy, so having a mountain bike worked in that situation.

I'm currently using a 2017 Trek Emonda S and am learning on how to use the gears currently. It's a road bike and I have had a mountain bike my whole life, so the experience is very different.
adele87 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-17, 11:55 AM   #9
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Bikes: 8
Posts: 27,246
Mentioned: 49 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2622 Post(s)
Even within track racing, there are several events.. in # 2, those legs are on the match sprinters..

Pursuit races , for just one, they are racing their opponent over longer distances, starting from opposite sides of the track, 1 wins when they catch the other,
or the relative difference when they cover the event distance, of say 10,000 meters..
fietsbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-17, 05:52 PM   #10
Brian25
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Tucson, AZ
Bikes: Ravello road, mountain and track bikes and tandems. Also Ravello travel trailers.
Posts: 373
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 90 Post(s)
Men's pursuit race distance is actually 4,000 meters.
There are lots of track (velodrome) racing on you tube. You can even see Steve Hegg win the pursuit final at the '84 Olympics.
The most exciting is the Kerin races.
Brian25 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-17, 06:02 PM   #11
caloso
Packfodding 3
 
caloso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Sacramento, California, USA
Bikes: Ridley Excalibur, Gazelle Champion Mondial, On-One Pompino, Specialized Rock Hopper
Posts: 35,452
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 767 Post(s)
If you're near a velodrome, I'd encourage you to check it out. It's an absolute blast. You need a track bike, of course, but most tracks have rental bikes for beginners. There are training sessions for newbies and there's a bit of an adjustment if you've never ridden a fixed gear. But it's a great way to get into racing, or just to try something new.
caloso is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-17, 01:32 PM   #12
adele87
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Bikes:
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by caloso View Post
If you're near a velodrome, I'd encourage you to check it out. It's an absolute blast. You need a track bike, of course, but most tracks have rental bikes for beginners. There are training sessions for newbies and there's a bit of an adjustment if you've never ridden a fixed gear. But it's a great way to get into racing, or just to try something new.
The closest velodrome is outdoors and about 300 miles north of here. :-)
adele87 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:12 AM.


 
  • Ask a Question
    get answers from real people!
Click to start entering your question.
I HAVE A QUESTION