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-   -   Those "Tour de France" bikes (http://www.bikeforums.net/professional-cycling-fans/443770-those-tour-de-france-bikes.html)

ablang 07-20-08 11:48 PM

Those "Tour de France" bikes
 
I love watching that show on TV, what limited coverage I have of it anyway (I only have over-the-air tv; no cable or satellite). My viewing is limited to 1 1-hr show every weekend.

Anyways, I was wondering if anyone knew what brands of bikes are typically used by the "best 1% of the best 1% of cyclists in the world"? And how much do you guys think is usually spent (a range) on these bikes?

USAZorro 07-21-08 12:30 AM

Two years back, Phonak's BMC TT bikes cost better than $10,000 apiece. I'm really not sure what to make of your other questions though. It's simple enough to research which brands of bicycles the Tour teams are using, and presuming they're pretty much the top-of-the-line models, to find out how much they cost.

talbert 07-21-08 12:41 AM

http://www.bikeforums.net/professional-cycling-fans/438208-where-can-i-find-list-teams-what-bikes-they-ride-nm.html

Has everything you want.

Tourmalet 07-21-08 02:39 AM

Every team is sponsored by a different bike manufacturer. Trek, Bianchi, Look, Felt, Giant, Cervelo, Lapierre, Ridley, Pinarello, Colnago, they are all there. Generally speaking the riders all ride high end carbon frames with highest end Shimano, Campagnolo or SRAM components (again depends on shonsorship) and high end wheels such as Zipp 404. They also tend to swap out stock stems and handlebars with CF parts, and stock bearings with ceramic bearings. Every second counts...

ettsn 07-21-08 07:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tourmalet (Post 7101183)
Every team is sponsored by a different bike manufacturer. Trek, Bianchi, Look, Felt, Giant, Cervelo, Lapierre, Ridley, Pinarello, Colnago, they are all there. Generally speaking the riders all ride high end carbon frames with highest end Shimano, Campagnolo or SRAM components (again depends on shonsorship) and high end wheels such as Zipp 404. They also tend to swap out stock stems and handlebars with CF parts, and stock bearings with ceramic bearings. Every second counts...

Except Gerolsteiner and Quickstep are both on Specialized. And Cofidis and Bouyges are both on Time. And no one is riding Trek (Astana) in the Tour this year. There's also Cannondale, BH, Wilier, Kuota and there was Scott (S-D).

Otherwise, you are correct. They all ride pinnacle bikes with the best bits of kit.

yellowjeep 07-21-08 08:12 AM

He should have put a "etc" after the list.

merlinextraligh 07-21-08 08:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tourmalet (Post 7101183)
404. They also tend to swap out stock stems and handlebars with CF parts, ...

Incorrect. CF hnadlebars and stems while being used more are still not widespread in professional bike racing. Most riders, and mechanics still prefer aluminum bars.

ettsn 07-21-08 08:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yellowjeep (Post 7102040)
He should have put a "etc" after the list.

My comment was more towards the "every team rides a different bike" part, as there are several teams riding the same bike.

Tourmalet 07-21-08 11:20 AM

Except on a Tuesday when they don't.

Except on a last Tuesday of the month when they do.

Except if the rider has an even numbered passport when they don't.

SERIOUSLY?????? :rolleyes:

JohnKScott 07-21-08 12:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tourmalet (Post 7101183)
and high end wheels such as Zipp 404.

I heard on the "enhanced" coverage last night that something like 85% (not an exact figure but likely close) of the peleton rides Shimano wheels. Though still high end (they were holding up DuraAce wheels).

merlinextraligh 07-21-08 02:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JohnKScott (Post 7103901)
I heard on the "enhanced" coverage last night that something like 85% (not an exact figure but likely close) of the peleton rides Shimano wheels. Though still high end (they were holding up DuraAce wheels).


That's not possible. Approximately half of the peleton is running Campy. None of those teams are using Shimano wheels, because they're not compatible (and I seriously doubt they're using JTek shiftmates.)

And of the teams that run Dura ace groupsets, many don't use Shimano wheels. For example CSC runs Dura Ace but uses Zipp wheels.

kc0bbq 07-21-08 02:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by USAZorro (Post 7100990)
Two years back, Phonak's BMC TT bikes cost better than $10,000 apiece. I'm really not sure what to make of your other questions though. It's simple enough to research which brands of bicycles the Tour teams are using, and presuming they're pretty much the top-of-the-line models, to find out how much they cost.

I think Landis's BMC frame for the mountain stages was the model with carbon nanotobes in the CF weave to cut down on the bulk needed and therefore weight. 1kg. I can't even imagine lifting the stupid thing, it'd be like a feather.

That gives you some serious leeway in selecting other components. Lots of freedom in weight distribution.

I wonder how light you could go while still being durable and safe for an entire TDF stage for an entire build if weight minimums went out the window.

maddyfish 07-21-08 02:42 PM

Don't forget Orbea.
I looked at a Euskatel team kit bibs and jersey today. I'd buy it if I could get the helmet.

merlinextraligh 07-21-08 03:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kc0bbq (Post 7104823)
I think Landis's BMC frame for the mountain stages was the model with carbon nanotobes in the CF weave to cut down on the bulk needed and therefore weight. 1kg. I can't even imagine lifting the stupid thing, it'd be like a feather.

That gives you some serious leeway in selecting other components. Lots of freedom in weight distribution.

I wonder how light you could go while still being durable and safe for an entire TDF stage for an entire build if weight minimums went out the window.


My guess is you'd see most bikes in the 13-15 lb range still. A Scott addict built up with Zipp 404's and a Sram group is still going to be about 13lbs. Below 1kg frame, and you start getting stome stiffness issues. (IIRC Chris horner didn't ride the Addict because it was too light.) With no weight limit, you'd likely see fewer power meters and Garmins, but there aren't a lot of uber light components out there are going to get you below 13lbs, and still meet the pros demands for stiffness.

JohnKScott 07-21-08 03:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by merlinextraligh (Post 7104579)
That's not possible. Approximately half of the peleton is running Campy. None of those teams are using Shimano wheels, because they're not compatible (and I seriously doubt they're using JTek shiftmates.)

And of the teams that run Dura ace groupsets, many don't use Shimano wheels. For example CSC runs Dura Ace but uses Zipp wheels.

Hmmmm...maybe I misunderstood. Now I wish I had TIVO :D

Laggard 07-21-08 04:11 PM

Keep in mind that the UCI has a weight limit of 6.8 kg per bike. Meaning they can not be below that. That's roughly 15 pounds. Since it's fairly easy to build a bike lighter than that, teams end up putting lead weight on bikes to get above the limit. A UCI rule that should maybe be changed.

roadwarrior 07-21-08 04:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Laggard (Post 7105459)
Keep in mind that the UCI has a weight limit of 6.8 kg per bike. Meaning they can not be below that. That's roughly 15 pounds. Since it's fairly easy to build a bike lighter than that, teams end up putting lead weight on bikes to get above the limit. A UCI rule that should maybe be changed.

Yeah, UCI says anything under that weight may have a safety factor. With the top teams telling the UCI to take a hike, maybe that rule will go away as well.

Weight limits apply to UCI races. I know guys that run way under that in races.

caloso 07-21-08 04:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Laggard (Post 7105459)
Keep in mind that the UCI has a weight limit of 6.8 kg per bike. Meaning they can not be below that. That's roughly 15 pounds. Since it's fairly easy to build a bike lighter than that, teams end up putting lead weight on bikes to get above the limit. A UCI rule that should maybe be changed.

More functional to go with 105/Centaur components, aluminum bars and seatposts, and a nice comfy saddle.

tcs 07-21-08 04:42 PM

What bikes are the neutral support cars toting this year?

tcs

hocker 07-21-08 04:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by merlinextraligh (Post 7102048)
Incorrect. CF hnadlebars and stems while being used more are still not widespread in professional bike racing. Most riders, and mechanics still prefer aluminum bars.

This is correct. I believe the reason being is simply the strength of alumunium and the added weight. I guess they get bikes (GAR) that weigh around 13 pounds, but the TdF requires a 15 limit. Something like that.

justinb 07-21-08 04:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tcs (Post 7105651)
What bikes are the neutral support cars toting this year?

tcs

They still look suspiciously like CAAD9's with Dura Ace and toe clips to me, but maybe someone else knows more.

yellowjeep 07-21-08 05:03 PM

Im pretty sure you are right about that one.

justinb 07-21-08 05:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yellowjeep (Post 7105776)
Im pretty sure you are right about that one.

Actually, I'm wrong. CAAD9 with Force, apparently.
http://lh3.ggpht.com/scarlettbueller...JPG?imgmax=512

caloso 07-21-08 05:07 PM

I'll take the 54 in the middle, please. (Just shield your eyes in case those R-Sys wheels explode.)

nmanhipot 07-24-08 02:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by USAZorro (Post 7100990)
Two years back, Phonak's BMC TT bikes cost better than $10,000 apiece.

$9,999.99 wholesale. For the frame. At least before Floyd got busted. I imagine your average "Tour" bike could be had for between $7-10K. Campy costs significantly more than Shimano. Wheels are a big factor, too. Zips, Bora Ultras and Aeolus wheelsets are over 2K for the set. Some of the teams still opt for high-grade, lightweight, low profile tubulars which aren't too expensive, though. The price of the bikes are nothing in comparison to what it costs for a GC rider's contract, however, to put things in perspective.


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