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Old 09-29-08, 07:05 AM   #1
SamDaBikinMan
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Another perspective on Leadville.

I have given this some thought and came to realize one importane factor.

In the 2008 olympic mountain bike mens race we might as well have done a no show. Our chosen atheletes were not even close to being competitive.

Now, consider that this represents the pool of American riders in MTB. The Europeans kicked our @$$es.


SOOOO, is any win here on the domestic scene in any way an indicator of how well LA can/will perform on the European circuit? If these top Euro riders had been at Leadville would they have dessimated LA and Dave Weins?

Think about it.......
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Old 10-22-08, 05:40 PM   #2
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An interesting observation. However, I think that there are some issues. MTB in America may not attract the best athletes due to less money to be made. Only a few on top make a living I believe. Since there is more support and interest in cycling in Europe it attracts more athletes and has stronger support. Look at alpine skiing. It started in America but it is bigger in Europe as a sport than in America.

Also, it seems like US mtb racing favors long endurance races, technical races, and long grueling lung busters rather than fast easier cross country courses with multiple stages. And due to the few mtb stage races in America our guys are not trained or fit well enough to compete in the kind of courses they have in Europe. It's possible our best road riders would do better in the europe mtb scene due to their training. That's my guess.

Another theory is that the food in America has more problems with quality and bad additives due to corrupt FDA and too much profiteering in the food industry. Could also be American fast food and processed food is really bad for you and American athletes eat more of this stuff and it is effecting the performance of our endurance athletes the most.

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Old 10-22-08, 09:21 PM   #3
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you don't think they have junk food in europe?

You also think alpine skiing was invented in the US?

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Old 10-23-08, 06:54 AM   #4
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Look at alpine skiing. It started in America but it is bigger in Europe as a sport than in America.
.

So they moved the Alps to Europe after the sport started here???

Wow what a feat of engineering that must have been.
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Old 10-23-08, 05:19 PM   #5
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you don't think they have junk food in europe?

You also think alpine skiing was invented in the US?

Ya, I know they have junk food everywhere. But it seems to me there is more of it in America and on every street corner. Also, it seems to me that Europeans are more concerned about what is in their food.

As far as I know. Miners in the Sierra Nevada mountains were the first to strap long wooded boards to their feet to ski. Then somehow the idea caught on in Europe. I think it became commercial in Europe however, before it did in America. Maybe someone else knows a little more about this. Nordic skiing was invented in northern Europe I believe.
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Old 10-23-08, 08:43 PM   #6
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As far as I know. Miners in the Sierra Nevada mountains were the first to strap long wooded boards to their feet to ski. Then somehow the idea caught on in Europe. I think it became commercial in Europe however, before it did in America. Maybe someone else knows a little more about this. Nordic skiing was invented in northern Europe I believe.
Skiing was first developed in Scandinavia in the Middle Ages, and that's where it continued to develop through the 19th century. The words ski and slalom are both Norwegian words.

A Norwegian named Sondre Norheim is known as the father of modern skiing. He developed all sorts of techniques as well as modern ski bindings and more efficient skis with curved sides. He emigrated to the US in the 1880's and moved to North Dakota.
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Old 10-25-08, 07:26 PM   #7
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Skiing was first developed in Scandinavia in the Middle Ages, and that's where it continued to develop through the 19th century. The words ski and slalom are both Norwegian words.

A Norwegian named Sondre Norheim is known as the father of modern skiing. He developed all sorts of techniques as well as modern ski bindings and more efficient skis with curved sides. He emigrated to the US in the 1880's and moved to North Dakota.
Ok it seems you guys were right, but not completely. Though an important person in skiing, evidence does not support that Norhiem invented all of the things that are attributed to him since evidence exits that show most of his technologies existed before him. He is primarily the father of ski jumping.

As far as I know the first ski race was organized in 1843 in Norway. It is not clear in my research exactly which kinds of events were there beside ski jumping and some kind of cross country like race. I think a third event was some kind of alpine like downhill skiing but it is not clear as to what type of event exactly it was. Weather it was more of a gentle all downhill cross country type of event or a steeper, fast all gravity driven event. After that 1843 race, downhill skiing fell out of popularity and was no longer included in later races for many years and the American form of fast downhill skiing was even discouraged in Europe for many years. Thus the Scandinavian influence of skiing became more centered on cross country and jumping for many years. However, the skiers of Telemark probably invented the first methods for higher speed turning in downhill situations but it is uncertain when they invented this. At least as early as 1888 but it did not catch on in Europe until the early 1900's.

But the first organized "downhill" type of race that included high speeds of up to 90 mph were in the Sierra Nevadas in 1857. The miners were using downhill or alpine skiing techniques as early or earlier than the 1850's. So it seems that the genesis for the type of high speed skiing on a steep long course with long runs of straight skiing at high speed was pioneered by the miner's of the Sierra Nevada.

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Old 12-03-08, 04:14 AM   #8
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But the first organized "downhill" type of race that included high speeds of up to 90 mph were in the Sierra Nevadas in 1857. The miners were using downhill or alpine skiing techniques as early or earlier than the 1850's. So it seems that the genesis for the type of high speed skiing on a steep long course with long runs of straight skiing at high speed was pioneered by the miner's of the Sierra Nevada.

Religion was also pioneered in America. Sure there were gods and holy lands and apostles and crusades and stuff like that. But the first Drive-Thru wedding chapels and stadium sized evangelist churches were in the US. Those really got the ball rolling.
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Old 12-03-08, 09:13 PM   #9
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...
But the first organized "downhill" type of race that included high speeds of up to 90 mph were in the Sierra Nevadas in 1857. The miners were using downhill or alpine skiing techniques as early or earlier than the 1850's. So it seems that the genesis for the type of high speed skiing on a steep long course with long runs of straight skiing at high speed was pioneered by the miner's of the Sierra Nevada.
Without bindings too! How cool is that!

Seriously, you know what the second guy on a bike said when he saw the first guy? "I can catch him."

There's no reason to suppose that skiing was any different, regardless of the presence or absence of the fourth estate.
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