Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Professional Cycling For the Fans Follow the Tour de France,the Giro de Italia, the Spring Classics, or other professional cycling races? Here's your home...

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 07-21-13, 01:59 PM   #26
chasm54
Banned.
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Uncertain
Bikes:
Posts: 8,657
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by parkersdad View Post
No it is not France but it is still beautiful.
I too have been to Colorado, and I concur. But there is much more to the TdF than scenery. France has plenty of that, and not just in the Alps and Pyrenees. But it also has history, expressed in mediaeval villages, and monasteries on mountain-tops, and boulangeries, and Cezanne colourschemes, and... .

The Tour is part of the fabric of the place, it is among the things that make France, France. No North American bike race, however challenging the terrain or beauty of the landscape, could possibly come close. It's the ​terroir.
chasm54 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-13, 02:16 PM   #27
PatrickGSR94
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
PatrickGSR94's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Memphis TN area
Bikes: 2011 Felt Z85 (road/commuter), 2006 Marin Pine Mountain (utility), 1995 KHS Alite 1000 (gravel grinder)
Posts: 6,141
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
How are they putting those images on the Arc de Triomphe? Some kind of projection system?
PatrickGSR94 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-13, 02:38 PM   #28
Flaneur
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Bikes:
Posts: 689
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The Tour consistently drew a better field than the Giro, in the post Merckx era...... and significantly better than the Vuelta.

The worldwide fanfare began with Lemond bringing 300 million Americans a champion to root for. This was accelerated by the other guy, from Texas. His name escapes me..........
Flaneur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-13, 02:50 PM   #29
merlinextraligh
pan y agua
 
merlinextraligh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Jacksonville
Bikes: Wilier Zero 7; Merlin Extralight; Co-Motion Robusta; Schwinn Paramount; Motobecane Phantom Cross; Cervelo P2; Motebecane Ti Fly 29er; Calfee Dragonfly Tandem
Posts: 29,133
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrenchFit View Post
I've been to Colorado; sir, it is not France.
Yeah, its tougher. The high point of the TDF is typically the Galibier at 9,000 feet. Highpoint of the US Pro Cycling Challenge last year was Independence Pass at over 12,000 feet. And there are paved roads in Colorado that go to 14,000 feet.

While there are steeper climbs in France, there are longer and higher climbs in Colorado.

Natural scenery wise, I'd give a close edge to France. Food, culture, history, architecture, France wins hands down.

But in terms of topography for a bike race, Colorado clearly has the topography for a world class event.
__________________
You could fall off a cliff and die.
You could get lost and die.
You could hit a tree and die.
OR YOU COULD STAY HOME AND FALL OFF THE COUCH AND DIE.
merlinextraligh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-13, 03:12 PM   #30
Zinger
Trek 500 Kid
 
Zinger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Spokane WA
Bikes: '83 Trek 970 road --- '86 Trek 500 road
Posts: 2,516
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 159 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by merlinextraligh View Post
Yeah, its tougher. The high point of the TDF is typically the Galibier at 9,000 feet. Highpoint of the US Pro Cycling Challenge last year was Independence Pass at over 12,000 feet. And there are paved roads in Colorado that go to 14,000 feet.

While there are steeper climbs in France, there are longer and higher climbs in Colorado.

Natural scenery wise, I'd give a close edge to France. Food, culture, history, architecture, France wins hands down.

But in terms of topography for a bike race, Colorado clearly has the topography for a world class event.
I was watching Greg Lemond's commentary on part of the '84 TDF and he credits the TDF steep climbs for being a little tougher and making the race friendlier for all rounders than was the now defunct Coors Classic. There has been a Colombian winner of the '82 Classic but many of the courses were circuit races and crits (which suits me just fine). The roads in Colorado are made for cars in the winter more so than in France.

And, like I said, if you combine the Tour of Utah, the USA Pro Challenge in Colorado and the Tour of Alberta Canada you'd have a Grand Tour right there. I don't think you could ever draw the crowds in North America like you do in Europe without crits and circuit races myself. They used to draw close to 100,000 spectators for the Coors Classics and most of them certainly weren't watching the road races like they do in Europe.

If they ever try and do it like they do in Europe it just won't work.

Last edited by Zinger; 07-21-13 at 03:22 PM.
Zinger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-13, 10:04 PM   #31
VNA
Senior Member
 
VNA's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 749
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Aside from the doping scandals that "plagued" all cycling competition internationally, the Giro had troubles with reroutings to favor their natives in some years and Spain had similar problems with shady deals of one kind or another.

The tour de France opened itself big time to the international cycling scene early on.

Somewhat suggestive but somewhat true: France has a very varied geography, very beautiful and of course it is the most visited country by tourists!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Tourism_rankings

And I am very surprised and pleased to hear the official announcer using french and english for a country that pride and so protective of its language--it is the least english speaking european country. Just very recently allowed to conduct university classes in english only--to learn english and its literature!
VNA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-13, 08:54 AM   #32
Gerryattrick
Beicwyr Hapus
 
Gerryattrick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: The Dis-United States of Europe
Bikes: 3 rideable (Genesis, Dawes & Merlin, 2 in pieces (Orange & Dawes)
Posts: 1,298
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Many other countries including the US have the geography coupled with beautiful scenery to put on a Tour as technically good as the TDF.

But they don't have the history and national fervour to make it such a success.

As a Welshman who has visited the western States many times I also concur that Colorado has fantastic terrain for cycling. There can't be too many greater mile-for-mile challenges than the races around Leadville. I was out of breath just climbing three flights of stairs there.

Last edited by Gerryattrick; 07-22-13 at 09:35 AM.
Gerryattrick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-13, 12:05 PM   #33
Keith99
Senior Member
 
Keith99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 5,866
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post
The Tour consistently drew a better field than the Giro, in the post Merckx era...... and significantly better than the Vuelta.

The worldwide fanfare began with Lemond bringing 300 million Americans a champion to root for. This was accelerated by the other guy, from Texas. His name escapes me..........
The Tour was always the biggest.

BUT pre Hinault all the Grand Tours were first a national event and second a European event (though the TDF was the most international). Hinault changed that twice. First bringing over the Americans (admittedly for his own benefit) and then after retiring as a racer being a large part of the TDF becoming truly international.

The Vuelta still is apt the produce a Spanish champion any given year. The Giro is the big race for Italians and still is more apt to produce an Italian champion than one from any other country.

The Tour is the big event, but with a price. When was the last French GC champion? When was there last more than one Frenchman on the podium (counting the first 3 places and the KOB and Points Jerseys)?

To compete with the Tour any other event has to become the Tour. The risk is high as you have to lose the national flavor and you may not succeed in becoming a true international event in the same way as the TDF.
Keith99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-13, 01:14 PM   #34
Leinster
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 2,106
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith99 View Post
The Tour is the big event, but with a price. When was the last French GC champion? When was there last more than one Frenchman on the podium (counting the first 3 places and the KOB and Points Jerseys)?
Hinault was the last champion (85). Virenque seems to be the last Frenchman to finish in the top 3 ('96 and '97). There've been a few French KOM winners (Rolland last year, for example, who was also best young rider). Jalabert won the green twice (92 and 95).

The thing is, though, Virenque and Jalabert are the only Frenchmen since Fignon to really challenge for the top spot in any of the grand tours. It's not that the Tour is too international, it's also that French riders aren't as good. There have been Italian and Spanish winners not only of the Vuelta and Giro, but also of the Tour since the last French Tour winner.
Leinster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-13, 01:27 PM   #35
Zinger
Trek 500 Kid
 
Zinger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Spokane WA
Bikes: '83 Trek 970 road --- '86 Trek 500 road
Posts: 2,516
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 159 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post
The Tour consistently drew a better field than the Giro, in the post Merckx era...... and significantly better than the Vuelta.

The worldwide fanfare began with Lemond bringing 300 million Americans a champion to root for. This was accelerated by the other guy, from Texas. His name escapes me..........
Oh I think it was starting to go much more worldwide with competitors just before Lemond was in it although he was certainly responsible for bringing it to the attention of some of the then-200,000 Americans. Australian Phil Anderson and American Jonathan Boyer were in it by then and Anglos were set to invade the TDF irregardless of what Lemond did. It was a big race then and going more global.
Zinger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-13, 01:31 PM   #36
Leinster
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 2,106
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zinger View Post
Oh I think it was starting to go much more worldwide with competitors just before Lemond was in it although he was certainly responsible for bringing it to the attention of some of the then-200,000 Americans. Australian Phil Anderson and American Jonathan Boyer were in it by then and Anglos were set to invade the TDF irregardless of what Lemond did. It was a big race then and going more global.

Nobody in Ireland noticed when Stephen Roche won the Giro.

2 months later, when he won the Tour, every kid in the country (including me) wanted a racing bike.

It's the biggest because everyone wants to win it, and everyone wants to win it because it's the biggest. The 2 feed off each other.
Leinster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-13, 01:44 PM   #37
Zinger
Trek 500 Kid
 
Zinger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Spokane WA
Bikes: '83 Trek 970 road --- '86 Trek 500 road
Posts: 2,516
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 159 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leinster View Post
Nobody in Ireland noticed when Stephen Roche won the Giro.

2 months later, when he won the Tour, every kid in the country (including me) wanted a racing bike.

It's the biggest because everyone wants to win it, and everyone wants to win it because it's the biggest. The 2 feed off each other.
Well Lemond's success was hugely inspirational but cycling in the states was beginning to take off even before then. I actually watched Lemond go by in the Manitou Springs to Hoosier Pass road race stage of the '79 Red Zinger Classic but I didn't notice him nor do I remember seeing him. He was only 17 years old at that time (and finished 4th in the GC) I didn't have a clue who he was until he won the race (by then the Coors Classic) in '81. I was watching for Mark Pringle and George Mount among others.

But then I wasn't even paying attention to European racing until Americans were showing up in numbers in the TDF and neither were Americans for the most part. The TDF put Lemond in the spotlight alright.

Last edited by Zinger; 07-23-13 at 06:14 PM.
Zinger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-13, 01:56 PM   #38
Leinster
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 2,106
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Lemond himself said he planned his season around the Tour (he was the first to really do that 100%, iirc) because it was the race Americans had heard of. Lemond helped the profile of cycling and the Tour in the US, but Lemond wouldn't have had the profile he did in the US without the Tour.
Leinster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-13, 02:11 PM   #39
Zinger
Trek 500 Kid
 
Zinger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Spokane WA
Bikes: '83 Trek 970 road --- '86 Trek 500 road
Posts: 2,516
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 159 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leinster View Post
Lemond himself said he planned his season around the Tour (he was the first to really do that 100%, iirc) because it was the race Americans had heard of. Lemond helped the profile of cycling and the Tour in the US, but Lemond wouldn't have had the profile he did in the US without the Tour.
True that. His success in the TDF piqued the average American's interests and was no small part of promoting cycling in the US alright. He was only known to then-fans of the burgeoning US cycling scene as a phenom before that. Personally I was paying more attention to other riders who weren't yet turning pro in Europe until about '85 when Lemond brought American TV coverage to the TDF.

It was when some of those guys turned pro for the 7-11 team and went to the TDF that I even started watching what happened in Europe.
Zinger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-13, 03:08 PM   #40
Leinster
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 2,106
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zinger View Post
True that. His success in the TDF piqued the average American's interests and was no small part of promoting cycling in the US alright. He was only known to then-fans of the burgeoning US cycling scene as a phenom before that. Personally I was paying more attention to other riders who weren't yet turning pro in Europe until about '85 when Lemond brought American TV coverage to the TDF.

It was when some of those guys turned pro for the 7-11 team and went to the TDF that I even started watching what happened in Europe.
That's totally understandable too; from what I've read, pre-Lemond it wasn't so much that American riders couldn't ride against European pros, it was that before Lemond, it just hadn't occured to many to try. Similar to how an Indy Car racer wouldn't see much point in trying out for Formula 1.
Leinster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-23-13, 05:34 AM   #41
slcbob
bored of "Senior Member"
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: MD / metro DC
Bikes: Cross-Check/Nexus commuter. Several others for various forms of play.
Posts: 1,098
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leinster View Post
It's the biggest because everyone wants to win it, and everyone wants to win it because it's the biggest. The 2 feed off each other.
Well said.
slcbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-15, 11:39 PM   #42
DropBarFan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Bikes: 2013 Surly Disc Trucker, 2004 Novara Randonee , old fixie , etc
Posts: 1,697
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 57 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Astrozombie View Post
It isn't even the last one nor is there a yearly champion or anything right? I don't get how the Daytona 500 is the "super bowl" of Nascar when it's just the first race.
Daytona is a beautiful track & fairly challenging but winners often not the best drivers since the high speed tracks emphasize best car vs best driver. Richmond NASCAR track is the best, both drivers & spectators agree since it has best sight lines for spectators & as a short track it favors the ace drivers. I think there's a lot of bike race fans into auto racing & somewhat vice versa. Some major NASCAR drivers into cycling like Carl Edwards who does an annual Missouri tour.

Le Tour has the advantage of being the 1st super tour & Giro/Vuelta have to play 2nd fiddle esp in current times where winning is so tough that it's almost impossible to win 2 Grand Tours in a season. TDF is part of the French tourism promotion which I think plays a large part in the race always being shown on US/world TV. French countryside can be beautiful but of course the route footage doesn't feature the more working-class grimmer areas. I like the Vuelta coverage too, lots of tidy sunlit towns though again I'm sure they skip over the less-attractive spots.
DropBarFan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-15, 11:53 PM   #43
DropBarFan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Bikes: 2013 Surly Disc Trucker, 2004 Novara Randonee , old fixie , etc
Posts: 1,697
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 57 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by PatrickGSR94 View Post
How are they putting those images on the Arc de Triomphe? Some kind of projection system?
Yes, apparently so. 100th Tour had awesome sound & light show on L'Arc. Saw it all on TV but weirdly impossible to find a good complete YouTube recording. Arc de Triomphe already had the projection system arranged for other stuff like Bastille Day, however the 100th Tour show was simply stupendous! Ironically Paris is not esp hospitable to cyclists what with narrow traffic lanes & err, enthusiastic drivers.
DropBarFan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-15, 12:19 AM   #44
zonatandem
Senior Member
 
zonatandem's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Tucson, AZ
Bikes: Custom Zona c/f tandem + Scott Plasma single
Posts: 10,858
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Been following the Tour most years since the late 1930s when living in Europe, over the radio and in the daily newspapers. Then in some of the foreign newspapers in the US after WWII until TV made it even famous/watchable and as Americans started entering the event. Until TV most Americans had no clue about cycling in Europe or in the US.
Also like Ronde van Vlaanderen, Fleche Wallone, Vuelta d'Espana, Liege/Bastogne/Liege, Tour of Switserland, Giro d'Italia and Tour of Utah.
TV coverage has made cycling a bit popular in the US. Americans will not likely stand and watch racers go by for a few minutes like Euros do.
zonatandem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-15, 05:24 AM   #45
roadwarrior
Senior Member
 
roadwarrior's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: The Bike Business!!!
Bikes: Cannondale Super Six High Mod, Evo, Sram Red, CAAD9 Rival
Posts: 10,499
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by wabbit View Post
I actually like the Giro better, it's my favourite grand tour. The mountains are even better than the ones in the tour!
I agree. It's a better race. I enjoy it much more than the Tour, but the Tour is the Super Bowl, the Indy 500, etc. of bike racing.

Last edited by roadwarrior; 05-07-15 at 12:29 PM.
roadwarrior is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-15, 10:28 AM   #46
Leinster
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 2,106
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by DropBarFan View Post
Yes, apparently so. 100th Tour had awesome sound & light show on L'Arc. Saw it all on TV but weirdly impossible to find a good complete YouTube recording. Arc de Triomphe already had the projection system arranged for other stuff like Bastille Day, however the 100th Tour show was simply stupendous! Ironically Paris is not esp hospitable to cyclists what with narrow traffic lanes & err, enthusiastic drivers.
I'd love to ride the Champs-Elysees circuit one day, but only on a closed road!
Leinster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-15, 04:28 PM   #47
Leinster
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 2,106
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post
The Tour consistently drew a better field than the Giro, in the post Merckx era...... and significantly better than the Vuelta.
Just reading back through this thread now that it's revived and saw this. Of course, the way things panned out in 2014, it was the Vuelta which had the strongest field in the end, and ended up being the best race as a result. The Tour this year looks like it'll be the toughest field, provided they all stay upright.

When was the last time the Giro had the strongest GC lineup of all 3 GTs? Maybe back when Indurain was winning it?
Leinster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-15, 06:46 AM   #48
Giacomo 1 
Senior Member
 
Giacomo 1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Queens NYC
Bikes:
Posts: 2,489
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by zonatandem View Post
TV coverage has made cycling a bit popular in the US. Americans will not likely stand and watch racers go by for a few minutes like Euros do.
I agree, TV coverage has definitely gotten better here in the US over the past couple of years, and it's helping cycling to grow here in the post-Lance era. (A new Lance-like character would help it to grow here also, but that's for a different thread!)

Not sure about Americans not standing to watch racers go by however. I see some very big crowds in the Tour of California and the USA Pro Challenge these days. I think they are actually better attended than some of the European races I watch, especially the Veulta, which at times, looks like a local group ride instead of a major tour. I'm interested to see how the World Championships do in Virginia later this season. I'd love to see a truly national race here, one that puts several states together in one tour, say from Maine to Florida, or something to that effect. Logistically, it would be tough given the size of the US and the different state laws and governments, but who know, if it continues to grow, it might happen one day...
__________________
Colnago Super
Torelli Pista
Basso Gap
Fabio Barecci
Miyata 1400A

It never gets easier, you just go faster. ~ Greg LeMond
Giacomo 1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-15, 07:16 AM   #49
Mark Stone
Littledog
 
Mark Stone's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Southwest Desert
Bikes: 2013 Giant Escape 2
Posts: 2,896
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Giacomo 1 View Post
I agree, TV coverage has definitely gotten better here in the US over the past couple of years, and it's helping cycling to grow here in the post-Lance era. (A new Lance-like character would help it to grow here also, but that's for a different thread!)

Not sure about Americans not standing to watch racers go by however. I see some very big crowds in the Tour of California and the USA Pro Challenge these days. I think they are actually better attended than some of the European races I watch, especially the Veulta, which at times, looks like a local group ride instead of a major tour. I'm interested to see how the World Championships do in Virginia later this season. I'd love to see a truly national race here, one that puts several states together in one tour, say from Maine to Florida, or something to that effect. Logistically, it would be tough given the size of the US and the different state laws and governments, but who know, if it continues to grow, it might happen one day...
The Tour of the United States . . .
Mark Stone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-15, 11:12 AM   #50
Leinster
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 2,106
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Giacomo 1 View Post
I agree, TV coverage has definitely gotten better here in the US over the past couple of years, and it's helping cycling to grow here in the post-Lance era. (A new Lance-like character would help it to grow here also, but that's for a different thread!)

Not sure about Americans not standing to watch racers go by however. I see some very big crowds in the Tour of California and the USA Pro Challenge these days. I think they are actually better attended than some of the European races I watch, especially the Veulta, which at times, looks like a local group ride instead of a major tour. I'm interested to see how the World Championships do in Virginia later this season. I'd love to see a truly national race here, one that puts several states together in one tour, say from Maine to Florida, or something to that effect. Logistically, it would be tough given the size of the US and the different state laws and governments, but who know, if it continues to grow, it might happen one day...
The Tour DuPont used to do that, covered a lot of East Coast area. While googling it I found this thread from 10 years ago of guys on here (well, in the 33) lamenting the lack of stage races in the US; Tour DuPont?

I think a problem with DuPont is that its name didn't tell you where it was touring, so no obvious connection to the location was made. The ToC has established a connection with the state of CA, and it's started to build up its own major landmarks (Diablo, Baldy, stage finishes in coastal towns named Santa Something) and its own identity (where GC riders who don't want to do the Giro go, where Peter Sagan collects green jerseys).

I think it goes without saying that a "Tour of the Whole United States" is a pretty much impossible ask without setting aside about 2 months of the calendar, which the UCI will never do, or doing it piece-by-piece (New England this year, Rust Belt next year, Midwest Prairies the year after, Mountain West, West Coast, Desert South, Rebel South, East Coast, repeat the cycle) with the obvious problem that the event would find it very hard to establish any kind of rhythm or identity. France has the advantage of having a lot of different terrain in a package small enough to showcase all of it. California is about the right size to do that in a week too. The whole US, though, is a bit too massive to ever be properly covered.

Last edited by Leinster; 05-08-15 at 12:43 PM.
Leinster is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:57 PM.