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  1. #101
    Trek 500 Kid Zinger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Dopolina View Post
    Although I am not awed by Talansky finishing the stage (I certainly pulled for him during the Dauphine) I think a few here are missing the point as to why he finished and as to why it was important to him as a rider. The article actually got this part right, at least.

    It's not about perseverance now. It's about the future.

    If you climb off your bike when things are tough, ONCE, then the next time it just gets a little bit easier to climb off again. Then, that internal dialogue you have with yourself when you are suffering in a break or on a climb or in brutal cross winds, that inner voice telling you to just ease off for a moment, to sit up, to let the gap open wins. You start listening to your legs.

    Once you do that your career is over. Once that voice gains a foothold in your head you start drifting backwards and start finding yourself further and further from the podium because it became just too easy to stop the pain by giving in, even a little.

    A quick anecdote.

    We have a race here with a final climb that finishes at just above 3200m. The climb is over 50km long. It is brutal in places and get hardest above 2000m where it constantly pitches into double digits.

    In my last year of racing and running a team I was feeling pretty crappy before this race and so decided to drive the team car and hand my numbers off to a buddy from the industry who wanted to do the race but hadn't registered. I'm white, he's white, he wasn't going to finish on the podium so we figured no one would notice or care.

    So we were above 2400m and I was parked in the last feed zone feeding our guys. The main bunch and the various stragglers had all gone by when my friend comes into view, obviously suffering, and comes to a stop behind our team car. He told me he was done.

    I said ok and took his bike from him. Then I asked him a question. I asked, "Later, what story do you want to tell?"

    He said, "What?"

    I asked, "Tomorrow, what story do you want to tell? Do you want to tell the story of getting into the team car or the one about the epic ride to the finish and how much you suffered to get there?"

    He climbed back on his bike.

    He still thanks me to this day.

    That's why Talansky needed to finish. If this guy is ever going to be a real tour contender he needed to finish the stage. It needed to be the team doctor telling him not to start the next day, not the voice in his head.
    Pretty good post. I'm a Talansky fan, before the Dauphine and I'll buy this one.
    "I never lost a race because my bike was too heavy".......George Mount

  2. #102
    Senior Member Giacomo 1's Avatar
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    Quite a bit of hate going on here for Talansky.

    I'm surprised, although I know I shouldn't be, because last season it was Farrar's turn, and I was surprised then to. I'm not sure why American Tour fans seem to turn on their own so much and why they seem to go out of there way to prove to everyone that their not "homers". Now I'm not saying you have to be totally nationalistic and only root for the home team, but geez, why the hate for our own? Talansky is the first serious GC contender we have seen in awhile, yet so many people seem to be rooting against him. Tyler Farrar was treated in a similarly shabby way during last years Tour, even though he was, and still is, America's only serious sprint specialist.

    Talansky has been very humble IMO whether he's winning or losing. He has said the right things in every situation I have seen him in, and I think he is an ambassador for the sport in America. He's also put a good face on American racing to the world. Heck, the French fans seemed to love him as he came in last and unlike here, they appreciated the effort.

    So while you might have a foreign rider or two that are your favorites, as I do, it's always good to want to see the home team do well.

    Go TJ! (Let the hate begin)
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  3. #103
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Giacomo 1 View Post
    So while you might have a foreign rider or two that are your favorites, as I do, it's always good to want to see the home team do well.
    American cyclists are the "foreign riders".

    And I do want to see the "home team" do well.

  4. #104
    Heretic Caretaker's Avatar
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    I like what Talansky did and think it's admirable that Americans are celebrating something other than coming first.

    I also think that describing it as 'unique' or his ride on stage 11 as 'cycling lore' is inaccurate and premature in that order.
    History is the future

  5. #105
    Senior Member rousseau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Giacomo 1 View Post
    So while you might have a foreign rider or two that are your favorites, as I do, it's always good to want to see the home team do well.

    Go TJ! (Let the hate begin)
    You spelled "favourites" wrong. And since when is everyone here American? WTF is up with that assumption?

    No one disagrees that Talansky showed impressive will-power and spirit. It's just that the predictable American myopia, hyperbole and denigration of others gets tedious. By comparison, check out what happened to this guy:

    Tour de France: Reto Hollenstein suffers pneumothorax on stage 16

    The first stage after the second rest day of the Tour de France proved to be a nightmare for IAM Cycling's Reto Hollenstein who crashed after a touch of wheels as the peloton made its way out of Carcassonne. The Swiss rider finished in 161st place, crossing the line in the gruppeto 26:47 down on Michael Rogers (Tinkoff-Saxo).

    Hollenstein was examined in the Tour de France's mobile clinic after finishing in Bagneres-de-Luchon, which detected a pneumothorax of the right lung, in addition to multiple abrasions on his shoulder forcing him out of the race. The team already lost its leader, Mathias Frank, to a fractured femur in the final kilometre of stage 7.

    The Tour debutante was forced to chase for 60km to make contact with the peloton with his collapsed lung, having waited for five minutes at the side of the road after crashing. A team statement read that Hollensten was in tears after the longest stage in the 2014 Tour.

    He will undergo further checks by scanner to be undertaken in hospital to assess the extent of his injuries

    Tour de France: Reto Hollenstein suffers pneumothorax on stage 16 | Cyclingnews.com
    Anyone who races in the Tour, Giro or Vuelta is a giant, but Jesus Christ: a collapsed lung! Puts the whole "inspirational story" of Talansky into its proper perspective.
    The pleasure is momentary, the position ridiculous, and the expense damnable.

  6. #106
    Trek 500 Kid Zinger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rousseau View Post
    Anyone who races in the Tour, Giro or Vuelta is a giant, but Jesus Christ: a collapsed lung!
    That's incredible! I've had a pneumothorax and while there are different degrees of that, any partial collapse of a lung are going to run you short of breath, not to mention the pain of having taken a crash hard enough to bust a lung.

    And there's considerable pain around the lung itself from the contraction as well.
    "I never lost a race because my bike was too heavy".......George Mount

  7. #107
    Senior Member Giacomo 1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rousseau View Post
    You spelled "favourites" wrong. And since when is everyone here American? WTF is up with that assumption?
    No assumption at all. I addressed this post to American audiences so there was no need for you to reply -

    I'm not sure why American Tour fans seem to turn on their own so much and why they seem to go out of there way to prove to everyone that their not "homers".

    Quote Originally Posted by rousseau View Post
    No one disagrees that Talansky showed impressive will-power and spirit. It's just that the predictable American myopia, hyperbole and denigration of others gets tedious. By comparison, check out what happened to this guy:
    Easy Napoleon...
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