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  1. #1
    Overacting because I can SpongeDad's Avatar
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    Racing vs. commuting

    I'm just starting to look at CX. It seems that CX bikes are either used for commuting or racing, which strike me as pretty different pursuits. Are there some bikes that are more focused on one over the other? Which ones? (I'm more interested in this from a weekend racing perspective.)

  2. #2
    Humvee of bikes =Worksman Nightshade's Avatar
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    Cross bikes are the most versatile (sp?) of all the bike "types" out there.

    These bikes are designed to "do it all" as part of a cross course so it
    stands that they would be the best for everything.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpongeDad
    I'm just starting to look at CX. It seems that CX bikes are either used for commuting or racing, which strike me as pretty different pursuits. Are there some bikes that are more focused on one over the other? Which ones? (I'm more interested in this from a weekend racing perspective.)
    Speaking as the avg weekend warrior, cyclocross is a fall/winter sport in Eastern Canada. So, what are you going to do with the thing (2001 Trek XO1) the rest of the time? Commute & have fun with the bike. Since it is my primary & basically only bike, I will use it for everything.
    I swap to road tires & try my luck at duathlons every so often to keep fit over summer.
    Redline Conquest & Kona Jake The Snake come to mind as the more race oriented bikes.
    Trek XO1, Bianchi Axis, Jamis Aurora, Fuji Cross, & Surly CrossCheck are more all rounders.
    Note sure where the Cannondale Cyclocross or the 2006 Specialized TriCross fit in the mix.
    Just my $0.02 worth.
    Give generously to The Heart & Stroke Foundation http://ww2.heartandstroke.ca/
    Keep on running & 'cross at RunningMania.com http://www.runningmania.com/forum/vi...15813&start=50
    Proud supporter of local shops!

  4. #4
    Senior Member filtersweep's Avatar
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    Cross bikes also usually offer the most bang for the buck- they are built more solidly than road bikes (tougher framesets), don't have all the ultralight parts (and are correspondingly cheaper), and the fad and fasion of cross has been more about DIY, frankenbikes, race with what you have (rather than road racing where some newbie racer shows up on a $3000+ machine).

    They are easy to put fenders on...

  5. #5
    Rabbinic Authority
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    As much as I wanted a 'cross bike since the 80s, I bought my Cannondale Cyclocross because it has a great frame and fork, is spec'ed for cross racing (it's not a "quasi" tri-chainring bike), and allows for a great degree of versatility in riding styles. I would be interested in racing eventually, but for right now I use it for riding to work and for tooling around and exploring NYC after work.

    If you're using a bike for commuting, best to evaluate your commute first. Is it on quiet and smoothly paved roads, or is it more diverse like my commute which involves asphalt, gravel, cobblestones, traffic, and everything else NYC can throw at you?

    If you want to race, get a more race-oriented bike such as the Cannondale or Kona, or something else that isn't "quasi" (commuting-light ATB-touring-etc...). BTW, Cannondale's two 'cross bikes are race-oriented. One the frames are the same, with the red one featuring a UCI-illegal disc brake setup and the blue one being a great out of the box racer.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpongeDad
    I'm just starting to look at CX. It seems that CX bikes are either used for commuting or racing, which strike me as pretty different pursuits. Are there some bikes that are more focused on one over the other? Which ones? (I'm more interested in this from a weekend racing perspective.)
    There are numerous cross bike that are raceable yet set up to accept fenders or panniers. (ie set up for commuting, as a city bike, or for light touring.

    others are more obviously made to be just race machines. light weight and no rack eyelets...

    examples of some fancy machines...

    you want Ti? check out the Moots , IF Planet Cross Ti, Moratti, or Airborne

    you can get all-carbon (or part-carbon) from Ridley or Alan

    you can get Scandium-Al from Bianchi (cross concept ) or Salsa.

    you could get a sweet-looking steel frame from Strong, IF,

    Fancy, racy Aluminum bikes available from Empella, Ridley, and Colnago
    Specialized is xcoming out with a new S-works frame (and some more economical complete bikes).

    all the usual suspects make nice racable machines too- Bianchi Axis, surly cross-check, Lemond Poprad, Redline, Kona, Cannondale, etc.

    plenty of other choices out there these days

    marc

    marc

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