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  1. #1
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    Cannondale Cyclocross Disk

    Hey all, totally new to this forum, and may as well be new to riding it has been so long! I owned a 10 speed way back when Schwinn was the "only" name, and 10 speeds is what you had!

    Anyway, I have money for one bike. I would like it as a commuter/daily bike, but also one that I would like to train with as I have a goal in my mind of one day riding in the Iron Horse Classic in Durango, CO. I don't think riding this coming Spring's race is totally out of the question just yet, however being that I haven't ridden in so long, plus the extra mile of elevation has me worried that at worst, it will be Spring 08 that I do compete. I just moved to Colorado Springs a week ago, and already have been bitten by the bike bug!

    Anyhow, the biggest feature for me of this particular bike is the disk brakes. I know gear wise, I can do just about whatever in the aftermarket...my biggest fear is that a cyclocross bike won't be "for me" and my particular needs...and that it would be a horrible choice for this exact race, which is a road race, but also promises that there may be road construction (or not) that time of year. Any suggestions for me here?

    Thanks all!

    Sam

  2. #2
    The Truth Ih8lucky13's Avatar
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    Generally a cyclocross bike would be a terrible idea for a road racer, but since your new to the sport and just getting your legs under you, a cross bike wouldn't be a bad idea.
    If you want to race you can't get the disc brake those are against UCI regs. but otherwise you should look into the local cross scene in Colorado I am sure there are plenty of races you can get into.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ih8lucky13
    Generally a cyclocross bike would be a terrible idea for a road racer, but since your new to the sport and just getting your legs under you, a cross bike wouldn't be a bad idea.
    If you want to race you can't get the disc brake those are against UCI regs. but otherwise you should look into the local cross scene in Colorado I am sure there are plenty of races you can get into.
    Could I assume you consider it a terrible idea because of the extra heft, even if one were to put road wheels and tires on?

    As for racing, I'm not really into that scene, maybe in a couple years...but I do want to ride the Durango to Silverton race. That said, anyone can enter into that "race" which to me, I don't consider it that, as I'm there trying to beat a train to Silverton in 3.5 hours/52 miles, and about 6000 feet of total incline to over 11,000 feet! There is everyone from pro's to guys on unicycles running that race! I think their turnout was over 8,000 last year!

  4. #4
    Rabbinic Authority
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    This is not the bike for you.

    Not that there is anything wrong with it, I have the Cannondale Cyclocross (w/o disks). However, I ride it like a true cyclocross bike and do take it onto the road as well. It's basically a CX race bike, so it's very stiff and is not the most comfortable on the road but is very solid off-road. Light, experienced riders with excellent bike handling skills like myself will enjoy the bike on-road and off, but newer riders will find the ride on-road to be rough and abrasive.

    If you're not racing cyclocross, don't get a cyclocross bike. Get a road bike and invest instead into owning a lighter, more aero wheelset for racing and training, and a more stout and solid wheelset for commuting and even riding offroad.
    "Trails are for cyclocross bikes and mountain bikes only. Hiking and Horse Back riding is strictly prohibited. Horses will be confiscated and shot."

    Visit my blog: The Complete Jewish Cyclist (http://www.thecompletejewishcyclist.blogspot.com/)

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpearl
    This is not the bike for you.

    Not that there is anything wrong with it, I have the Cannondale Cyclocross (w/o disks). However, I ride it like a true cyclocross bike and do take it onto the road as well. It's basically a CX race bike, so it's very stiff and is not the most comfortable on the road but is very solid off-road. Light, experienced riders with excellent bike handling skills like myself will enjoy the bike on-road and off, but newer riders will find the ride on-road to be rough and abrasive.

    If you're not racing cyclocross, don't get a cyclocross bike. Get a road bike and invest instead into owning a lighter, more aero wheelset for racing and training, and a more stout and solid wheelset for commuting and even riding offroad.
    Awesome! Thanks for the stout advice! Much appreciated, as buying a bike is no small $$ thing. Next question really...I'm trying to stay American. I found all the companies I could find that still manufacture and build here in the USA. Cannondale, Trek (I've heard not anymore in '06), Merlin, LeMond, Klein, and a couple others I've never heard of, Aegis and Serotta, came up in my search. Some are more $$ than the next, but all are either running Shimano Ultegras, 105s, or a mix of both depending on price class. For my use, what should I concentrate on? I'm trying to stay in the $1500 range, so that I can afford an extra set of wheels, tires, pedles, seat, etc etc etc...I'm trying to keep everything needed/wanted under $2K.

    Thanks for your most helpful response.

    Sam

  6. #6
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    They're all excellent-quality bikes. The deciding factor should come from test riding bikes from the selection available at your local bike shops. The most important thing is to build a good repore with the shop you feel most comfortable buying from. The more serious they take you as a customer and a cyclist, the more care they will take in helping you select the optimum bike for you. Merlin is great, as is Serrota. They're more specialized as high-performance bicycles, but Trek, Cannondale, and Specialized can also provide bikes that can amply satisfy your cycling needs.

    The most important thing, though, is to concentrate of getting the bike with the best frame and fork. Parts can always be upgraded, frame material can't. Scoring a killer frame and fork in the best possible titanium, carbon, or aluminum, is more important than getting a certain mix of Ultegra versus 105. When I bought my Cannondale, the component selection was of little concern to me. I personally didn't check to see which parts were which. I just knew that Cannondale makes some of the best aluminum frames out there, and that this particular model was raced by Enrico Franzoi, a Lampre rider and Italian national cyclocross champion.

    Good luck, let us know what you end up buying.
    "Trails are for cyclocross bikes and mountain bikes only. Hiking and Horse Back riding is strictly prohibited. Horses will be confiscated and shot."

    Visit my blog: The Complete Jewish Cyclist (http://www.thecompletejewishcyclist.blogspot.com/)

  7. #7
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    Awesome advice again! Thanks! As for choosing a great bike shop, how should I approach them? What should they provide me to make me feel comfortable? There are several good shops around this area...

    I guess I should post a new topic, or do a search for bike shops in the Colorado Springs area!

    Thanks, and I'll post up when I get a bike.

  8. #8
    The Truth Ih8lucky13's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by yosemitesamiam
    Awesome advice again! Thanks! As for choosing a great bike shop, how should I approach them? What should they provide me to make me feel comfortable? There are several good shops around this area...

    I guess I should post a new topic, or do a search for bike shops in the Colorado Springs area!

    Thanks, and I'll post up when I get a bike.
    Choose a bike shop that you feel most comfortable with, My local bike shop has proven to be a god send the owner actually gave me pretty honest advice on the brands he carried and did'nt carry, he actually went out of his way to get me properly fitted and stayed after store hours to get me fitted on the bike properly,. It was so damn intensive i actually got winded from the process.
    I always try to make sure i purchase from there first, and he always gives me bonus t-shirts from Hammer Gel and Zipp when he gets them in plus free socks.
    When I bought my Guerciotti cross frame on-line he gave me a nice discount on some parts to put it together, and he even agreed that I would be stupid to pass up the deal on the frame I got, knowing he could nott match the price, that I was given.

  9. #9
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    Having extensive experience working in bike shops and in retail, the best way to deal with a shop is through honesty and by helping make thier jobs easy.

    Let them know exactly what kind of cyclist you are, what your experience is, and what you are looking for to the best of your ability. Do your product research before and during the buying process, and be sure give some indication as to whether or not you are serious about purchasing from a particular shop and when. The more they know your intentions, the more they can help you.

    Remember, bike shops are a business, and they want to sell you stuff. But they also know that a customer who has been helped well and is geared towards the right products and service in a confident, friendly, and comfortable manner is the customer who becomes a repeat and steady customer. They'll get thier money and sales, and you'll get the right products at the best deals.
    "Trails are for cyclocross bikes and mountain bikes only. Hiking and Horse Back riding is strictly prohibited. Horses will be confiscated and shot."

    Visit my blog: The Complete Jewish Cyclist (http://www.thecompletejewishcyclist.blogspot.com/)

  10. #10
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    I'm trying to figure out why y'all are steering the OP away from the Cannondale Cyclocross Disc. I have that bike - like the OP, my only other bike was an old Schwinn. I'm not saying that I might not consider something else, but my experience with this Cannondale, while not perfect, would not cause me to advise against someone purchasing it.

    I'd be curious to know more as to why you think it is the wrong bike for the OP.

    BTW, I have redone the gearing on my bike as I do some light off road riding, but, really prefer to ride the road.

    Not being disrespectful at all, just curious.

    Caruso

  11. #11
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    Oh, and one more thing . . . I find the bike very comfortable to ride. I admit, I'm puzzled about all this talk concerning frame comfort. Last weekend, I rode 150 miles over Saturday and Sunday - no discomfort at all. I run 700 x 23c pumped to 140 psi all the time and never have any sort of discomfort. I read about comfort all the time on this and many other forums - I just don't get it - that's all.

    Caruso

  12. #12
    The Truth Ih8lucky13's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carusoswi
    I'm trying to figure out why y'all are steering the OP away from the Cannondale Cyclocross Disc. I have that bike - like the OP, my only other bike was an old Schwinn. I'm not saying that I might not consider something else, but my experience with this Cannondale, while not perfect, would not cause me to advise against someone purchasing it.

    I'd be curious to know more as to why you think it is the wrong bike for the OP.

    BTW, I have redone the gearing on my bike as I do some light off road riding, but, really prefer to ride the road.

    Not being disrespectful at all, just curious.

    Caruso
    I wasn't trying to steer him away from this bike, but he stated he wanted to enter a road race, and I told him it would be better to get a road-bike, and if he wanted to race cross disc brakes are not allowed by the UCI, but other than that I have nothing against this bike what-so-ever.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ih8lucky13
    I wasn't trying to steer him away from this bike, but he stated he wanted to enter a road race, and I told him it would be better to get a road-bike, and if he wanted to race cross disc brakes are not allowed by the UCI, but other than that I have nothing against this bike what-so-ever.
    Thanks. I went back and reread the thread - Still, no one (yet) has responded to my question about comfort (not that you brought that subject up in your post). I love riding - am up to around 300-400 miles per week - and have yet to ride a bike where I would point to the frame as a reason for "harshness" in the ride. Maybe it's just me, or maybe I haven't tried enough different bikes.

    Caruso

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