Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 19 of 19
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    115
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    How far does a cyclocross bike's ride differ from a road bike?

    I'm currently riding my more upright hybrid around for commutes. It's been working well, but I feel like I have to output a lot more energy than I should just to stay up to a good speed (and most likely to counteract the suspension and head winds, which are pretty obvious when I'm on a good hill) Maybe it would be better suited for leisurely neighborhood strolls than trying to keep up with traffic...

    Needless to say, I'm leaning more towards a distance and speed friendly bike without sacrificing too much utility or comfort. Would a cyclocross style bike be overkill? Are these more intended for riding trails?

  2. #2
    The quieter you become... Falkon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    My Bikes
    1973 Raleigh Superbe, 2006 Trek 4300 with no original parts, 1984 Ciocc, Custom Keith Anderson
    Posts
    1,283
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I work at a shop that sells Fuji bikes, and I must say that I'm impressed! The fuji Ultegra cyclocross bike weighs only about a half a pound more than a comparable road bike. I'm considering buying a cyclocross bike soon, because I'll have the greatness of the road bike plus the possibility of wider tires, fenders for commuting, and even rack eyelets.

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Wichita
    Posts
    7
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Well...

    I have a cyclocross bike (Fuji Cross) and race it all the time on the road when the road bike has been in the shop and have had no problems. I raced in a crit and multiple circuit races and each time it has been excellent. I have alos raced it on mountain bike courses.

    with the cross bike you get the best of both worlds. I love the Fuji cyclocross bikes!

  4. #4
    Rabbinic Authority
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Silver Spring, MD (MABRA/MAC)
    My Bikes
    Cannondale Cyclocross, Specialized Langster, Giant TCR-C2 Composite
    Posts
    650
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The ride quality of a cyclocross bike, when used in non-CX racing purposes, will differ depending on the choice of wheels and tires. A CX bike with a CX wheelset, namely CX tires at, say 65 psi, will feel very sluggish on the road compared to a proper road wheelset with high-psi road tires. Likewise, you don't want to take those high-psi tires off the road the way you would with a proper CX wheelset.

    In all reality, I advise people who are not going to ride or race cyclocross to get a road bike and invest in an extra set of wheels for multi-purpose wheels, ones that are stout, strong, and rugged.
    "Trails are for cyclocross bikes and mountain bikes only. Hiking and Horse Back riding is strictly prohibited. Horses will be confiscated and shot."

    Visit my blog: The Complete Jewish Cyclist (http://www.thecompletejewishcyclist.blogspot.com/)

  5. #5
    The quieter you become... Falkon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    My Bikes
    1973 Raleigh Superbe, 2006 Trek 4300 with no original parts, 1984 Ciocc, Custom Keith Anderson
    Posts
    1,283
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The fuji cross has the eyelets for a rack and fenders, correct? I thought I saw them in the catalog picture.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    115
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I guess what I'm mainly wondering is if it'd be worth it to invest in a cyclocross bike almost entirely for road/commute use.

  7. #7
    +++++++++++++++ xccx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    My Bikes
    2 Felt F1X's, Surly Steamroller Fixed / Free, 2007 IF Crown Jewel, 2007 IF Planet X Singlespeed
    Posts
    349
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Bud_311
    I guess what I'm mainly wondering is if it'd be worth it to invest in a cyclocross bike almost entirely for road/commute use.
    you could, but whats the point? why not just get a "relaxed" road bike or a touring bike? or even an old touring bike? unless you plan on off roading, i dont see any reason to get a cx bike.

  8. #8
    Senior Member MrCjolsen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Davis CA
    My Bikes
    Surly Cross-Check, '85 Giant road bike (unrecogizable fixed-gear conversion
    Posts
    3,954
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by xccx
    you could, but whats the point? why not just get a "relaxed" road bike or a touring bike? or even an old touring bike? unless you plan on off roading, i dont see any reason to get a cx bike.
    Just because you don't "plan" on offroading, it doesn't mean you won't want to go down a dirt road if you think it leads someplace interesting. I think that the great thing about a cx bike is knowing that you're just a tire change away from going places generally off limits to road bikes.

    I have a Surly crosscheck. I'm pretty sure I'm every bit as fast on it as I was on my road bike.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    England
    Posts
    12,275
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Touring bikes are good all rounders fully capable of tackling tracks and trails and comfortable on the road. A midweight version such as Jamis Aurora is probably better than a heavyweight expedition tourer for everyday use.

  10. #10
    Senior Member MrCjolsen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Davis CA
    My Bikes
    Surly Cross-Check, '85 Giant road bike (unrecogizable fixed-gear conversion
    Posts
    3,954
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    As I said, I like my Crosscheck. Also, take a look at the Bianchi Volpe. The one thing to pay attention to is gearing. Generally, touring bikes have smaller triple setups in front (the Volpe has 48/38/38 Sugino cranks) with wider ranges in the back. For road applications, people generally like tighter gearing in back.

    Cross bikes generally have compact doubles or a double with a smaller outside ring.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    2,413
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Bud_311
    I guess what I'm mainly wondering is if it'd be worth it to invest in a cyclocross bike almost entirely for road/commute use.
    Yes

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Milwaukee
    Posts
    120
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    touring/CX merger

    Some bikes, like the Surly Cross Check or Bianchi Volpe ... or to a lesser degree Kona Jake or Bianchi Axis combine touring features with CX features. IMO, these bikes are the best "if you can have only one bike" bikes on the market. I bought a used Axis to use for light touring (including dirt roads). It has since replaced my MTB on singletrack and my hybrid for most commuting. It's also great on the open road, but I still need a faster, lighter road bike some day.

  13. #13
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    11
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I went with a CX for my road/commuter bike- it's already beefed up, it road much easier to my MTB body's usual, and I know that if I need to go off a curb, road, gravel, whatever I can. I test road the Felt and the Speicalized. The felt was very harsh to me- I'm used to a Haro with fat street tires and a front fork. The specialized felt like butter though. Very nice and smooth, felt much more like an extension to me.

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    CO
    My Bikes
    05 Lemond Poprad, 11 Jamis Dragon Race 29er, Surly LHT
    Posts
    439
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Bud_311
    I guess what I'm mainly wondering is if it'd be worth it to invest in a cyclocross bike almost entirely for road/commute use.
    Definitely.

    I have a cross bike with two wheelsets. With the road wheels on, it feels very much like a fast road bike, and I use it for that. With the cross wheels on, I take it on dirt roads and some singletrack. A very fun and versatile bike!
    Lemond Poprad / Jamis Dragon Race 29er / Surly LHT
    "the feel of steel"

  15. #15
    In Transition fruitless's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    here and there
    Posts
    382
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Bud_311
    I guess what I'm mainly wondering is if it'd be worth it to invest in a cyclocross bike almost entirely for road/commute use.
    There are differences, unless you are spending in excess of 2 hours in the saddle or riding with a fast group you probably wouldn't notice them although it really depends on the specific frame. Modern road frames don't have to be uncomfortable and serious competition cyclocross frames are often really stiff. Some of my local rides include a mile or two of gravel road, cyclocross tires feel a little better on the loose stuff but then they feel like pigs on the pavement, its a compromise either way. I ride on snow and ice enough that I like big fat studded tires in the winter so I commute on my CX bike.
    Last edited by fruitless; 08-12-06 at 12:19 AM.

  16. #16
    Speed Demon *roll eyes*
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Waterloo, Ontario
    My Bikes
    1998 specialized s-works mtn bike / 2005 Kona Jake the Snake
    Posts
    982
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I use a jake the snake as a road bike almost exclusively and love it for that. It converts well to a commuter. I do not feel slow on it and can ride for hours on it without becoming uncomfortable. At the moment, I can only afford one bike for the road, and since it has to do all, a cross bike rocks. Future plans include a road race bike and the cross bike as a foul weather/commuter/gravel road machine (I live in a rural area with a lot of gravel roads that would be a diversion to ride if nothing else).

    Do be sure to at least swap the tires if you road ride a cross bike. Next spring, a set of mavic krysium equipes is going on this bike for road use, and the stock wheels are going to be knobbied back up again.
    1998 Specialized S-works Hardtail - hotrodded
    2005 Kona Jake the Snake cyclocross

  17. #17
    (((Fully Awake))) Serendipper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    ~Serenading with sensous soliloquies whilst singing supple sentences that are simultaneously suppling my sonnets with serenity serendipitously.~ -Serendipper
    My Bikes
    Guerciotti Pista-Giant Carbon-Bridgestone300- Batavus Type Champion Road Bike, Specialized Hardrock Commuter, On-One The Gimp (SS Rigid MTB/hit by a truck)- Raleigh Sports 3-speed,Gatsby Scorcher, comming soon...The Penny Farthing Highwheel!
    Posts
    5,598
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I plan on getting a Jake as well. I say do it. Everything to gain by having a road style bike that can pull double duty as a trailbike.

    Do it, do it, do it.
    __________________________________________________________________________________________________

    無上甚深微妙法 .... 百千萬劫難遭遇..... 我今見聞得受持

  18. #18
    Senior Member rodrigaj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    1,126
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I ride a combination of road and compacted stone (bicycle trails) and find my Jamis Nova is an ideal bike for this. I ride 50 miles with no problems. I changed to continental contact tires and a longer stem and a brooks saddle. I'll never go 50 mph, but 30 mph is plenty fast for me. I have never considered road racing or cyclocross racing. This is strictly a commute, fitness, fun ride bike.

    Bottom line: cyclocross bikes are a great all round alternative.

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    fogtown...san francisco
    My Bikes
    Ron Cooper, Time VXSR, rock lobster, rock lobster, serotta, ritchey, kestrel, paramount
    Posts
    2,276
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by xccx
    you could, but whats the point? why not just get a "relaxed" road bike or a touring bike? or even an old touring bike? unless you plan on off roading, i dont see any reason to get a cx bike.
    the thing about a road bike is the lack of tire clearence, and touring bikes are better for tire clearence but a cross bike will typically net you more than 35cm of tire clearence.

    I use my cx bike mostly for commuting and it is great...with road tires, the bike feels pretty much as fast as my road bike and even with my cx tires pumped up to 90 psi, it feels like I'm not giving up much. and the canti brakes are just what I need for bombing down hills in the city.

    I also don't like the handling of long wheelbases typical of touring bikes...also touring bikes are often heavier than cx bikes. not to say the cross check is not a heavy bike...oh yeah thats the other thing, I don't like steel for commuter bikes.
    fogriderlooking for sun

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •