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  1. #1
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    need a little advice from you cycle cross folk

    So here's my problem.

    I own a cannondale road bike which i've been using a single gear in NY for many years. I moved out to the countryside and currently live on a dirt track. We have many simple trails in the woods in the area as well as many dirt roads to explore BUT my road bike is not up to the job and does not take the 35mm tires I want to use.
    So i've checking out the forum for the last week and I want to know

    A. Scattante XRL Cross Frame /fork.

    B. Nashbar X crosscyle frame with carbon fork.

    These are the two set ups that im debating over for my single gear, go anywhere, be all you can be bike.

    I've also been reading a little about the geometry of the cycle cross and i was wondering how close it compares to touring frame geometry.
    I do own a Bianchi Volpe and love the feel of that bike.

    So thanks for any opinions and advice anyone has for me.

    dave lant.

    - one last questions -
    Will it be tough to put my 700c wheels on to a cc frame if they are only 130mm instead of 135mm ?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Portland, OR i_r_beej's Avatar
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    Cannondale: '94 R400; Lemond Poprad '06; Specialized Epic Marathon '06; Specialized Stumpjumper '89; Redline Proline Pro Cruiser '10
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    I haven't compared the geometry of 'cross bikes to touring bikes.

    However, look at each bike's intended usage:

    Cyclocross-- sport-oriented performance; responsive handling (but slower than a road-bike); racing; off-road use

    Touring-- long-distance riding while carrying heavy loads; lower-relative speeds; stable handling; on-road use

    You need to decide what sort of riding you'll be doing.

    As for the wheels? How wide are the hubs you're referring to? The width of your hub must match the width of your new bike's rear drop-outs. Steel bikes can deal with being pinched closed or spread open to deal with a too-narrow or too-wide hub fairly easily. It'll just make mounting your wheel a little more fiddly.

    Composite and aluminum frames DO NOT take kindly to this sort of distortion. DON'T DO IT. Buy a new wheel or hub.
    Despite the fact that I constantly recommend Kool-Stop brake pads-- no, I don't work for Kool-Stop. (Although their factory is just a few blocks from my house!)

    I ride drop bars off-road. (The excellent On-One "Midge.")

  3. #3
    antisocialite dirtyphotons's Avatar
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    if your rear hub is spaced to 130 the difficulty of respacing it to 135 depends on the type of axle.

    if it's a bolt-on you should just get two 2mm (ideally 2.5mm) spacers and put one on either side, between the cone and the outer lock nut. if you don't know what i'm talking about your shop should be able to do this very cheaply.

    if it's a quick release, you'll have to replace the axle in addition to adding spacers. if you're comfortable doing this yourself it's pretty cheap. if you'd rather have a shop do it, it should still come out much cheaper than a new rear wheel.
    Quote Originally Posted by Sheldon Brown
    Because when fashion conflicts with function, I vote for function.

  4. #4
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    cool - thanks for the tips.

    I'm happy that i can use my old wheels on the bike.
    Now i have to pick a frame to use.

  5. #5
    I ride my bike Revtor's Avatar
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    Frame choice depends ona few things.. first of all, whats your budget?? second of all, how much can you spend?

    the Nashbar frame can't be beat if youre scraping change together and want a new frameset. Also check out the Surly CrossCheck - its a step above the nashbar ($420 frame + fork) is made of steel, and gets rave reviews as a do it all bike. it can fit some really fat tires too for when the goin gets muddy in the woods.. fun stuff rollin on 41's in the woods I tell ya. . .

    have fun, I wish I could buy a new bike right now!!!

    ~Steve

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