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  1. #1
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    Specialized vs. Surly ?

    Greetings Biking Community,

    I am relatively new to this world of riding a top quality bike.I am
    looking for a great bike that is better suited to the road without having
    me lean over and kiss the front tyre. Also, a bike that would be good
    for commuting on pavement (10 miles on average) and something that I
    could take to the bike paths ( flat dirt) with comfort plus durability,
    the Surly Cross-Check complete bike (maybe build it up with a 105 group)
    has been mentioned quite often in the various forums. The '07
    Specialized tricross comp has received quite a bit of favorable mention as
    well. I am willing to spend up to invest up to $2,500 for a quality bike

    So, as it stands the '07 Specialized tricross Comp and the Surly
    Cross-Check Complete are the bikes that I am currently interested in. I
    would like to know what your opinions are of these two bikes and any
    other bikes that would meet my needs at the $2,500 price range.

    I really appreciate your assistance with this , thanks.
    dblackcole is online now Edit/Delete Message

  2. #2
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    hi
    check out my other threads etc...
    i have been thinking of the same thing
    the bikes we are both loking at are similar
    many here have suggested a steel frame
    not sure what i will get
    many here also suggested a touring bike
    oh the decisions are killling me

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by archermd
    hi
    check out my other threads etc...
    i have been thinking of the same thing
    the bikes we are both loking at are similar
    many here have suggested a steel frame
    not sure what i will get
    many here also suggested a touring bike
    oh the decisions are killling me

    Yeah, it is really difficult because if I am going to shell out that kind of dough I would like to be sure that I am getting the "best bike for my money".

  4. #4
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    so true
    if only... i could give $2K to someone to go buy the bike for me
    to make the selection
    ensure the fit
    set it up
    and get me riding
    too bad it won't happen
    but the folks here do offer some kind and helpful advice
    a very welcoming place for me as a newbie
    i am most pleased with this fourm site for sure
    i hope my riding is as satisfying

  5. #5
    Member John Dark's Avatar
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    Check out Rivendell. Most owners are pretty satisfied and most of their production line models are in your price range.


  6. #6
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    ok
    i thought rivendell was super high end and expensive

  7. #7
    I ride my bike Revtor's Avatar
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    either of those bikes are worthy. you will love whichever you choose. If you are not going to seriously race it, then buy whichever moves you the most!

    which does your LBS carry? definitely if you can get one fitted thats a big thing.. LBS loyalty is always a good thing... if you can determine your frame size "well enough" by web and forum surfing, then hey, maybe LBS isnt a big deal..

    are you more of a steel kinda guy, or hydroformed alum/carbon guy?

    test ride both! if you can...

    fall in love with one, then buy it.

    ~stv

  8. #8
    Member John Dark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by archermd
    ok
    i thought rivendell was super high end and expensive
    The customs are more expensive. But these are the rough prices of complete bikes for the production models, according to their website:

    Quickbeam: $1400
    Bleriot: $1900
    Rambouillet: $2350
    Legolas: $2700
    A. Homer Hilsen/Saluki/Atlantis/Mixte: $2800

  9. #9
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    I bought an AL cx frame on eBay for $90, Nashbar cx carbon fork for $110 and an Ultegra build kit for $700. I'm parting the road bike parts (wheels, brakes) that won't fit and buying the right gear. All said and done, I plan on spending less than $1500 for a "Frankenstein" commuter that should get me anywhere I need to go. So I would say that for $2500 you should be able to find what you need. IMO a cx bike to commute on is the perfect place to start, but you'll need to modify it for it to be a great commuter.

    I really wanted a CrossCheck, but got my frame/fork for half as much. I've also read that the CC frame is not real responsive so, as much as I didn't want to commute on aluminum, it was cheap so I'm going to give it a try. I like to ride fast and agressive so I wanted someting to fit my riding style.

    Good Luck.

  10. #10
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    The advantage of a Specialized is that you can see the bike,ride it, not just see a picture of the bare frame, then fancy yourself "creating your own bike", you would be hard pressed to improve the way Specialized is spec'd. Specialized is quite good at that. Surley is a steel bike,a good one,not the best. I'll admit it's a kind of fun thing, participating in component selection, this may be an important aspect of your new bike experience
    only you can answer that. If you want to consider or simply look at other steel bikes, check these two: www.jamisbikes.com and www.bianchiusa.com If nothing else, you can see what you do and don't like. Browsing an on-line parts catalogue and chatting or reading here on the forum is one thing, actually seeing a bicycle one line or for real is something else.

  11. #11
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    Thank you all for your helpfull insights.

  12. #12
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    you might be able to talk a specialized dealer into ordering a surly if you commit to buying one of the two bikes.

    your best bet for doing this would be going to a large LBS (most specialized dealers are pretty big).

  13. #13
    ROM 6:23 flipped4bikes's Avatar
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    I love my '06 Tricross Comp. It has similar gearing to the '07, so the range maybe too narrow to your liking. The Tricross is a very versatile bike. The Cross Check is quite popular here on BF. Either bike you will be happy...
    Every time we let a vehicle pass there is a little bit of compromise. But compromise allows the city to function and allows cyclists to function in the city. The trick is not to eliminate compromise but to learn how to work safely within it.

    --Robert Hurst

  14. #14
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    I vote specialized.

    Quote Originally Posted by dblackcole
    Greetings Biking Community,

    I am relatively new to this world of riding a top quality bike.I am
    looking for a great bike that is better suited to the road without having
    me lean over and kiss the front tyre. Also, a bike that would be good
    for commuting on pavement (10 miles on average) and something that I
    could take to the bike paths ( flat dirt) with comfort plus durability,
    the Surly Cross-Check complete bike (maybe build it up with a 105 group)
    has been mentioned quite often in the various forums. The '07
    Specialized tricross comp has received quite a bit of favorable mention as
    well. I am willing to spend up to invest up to $2,500 for a quality bike

    So, as it stands the '07 Specialized tricross Comp and the Surly
    Cross-Check Complete are the bikes that I am currently interested in. I
    would like to know what your opinions are of these two bikes and any
    other bikes that would meet my needs at the $2,500 price range.

    I really appreciate your assistance with this , thanks.
    dblackcole is online now Edit/Delete Message
    I own a surly cross-check I use mostly for commuting and have a tricross s-works. if I had to choose, I'd go with the Sepcialized. for racing a double chainring makes the most sense for most people- a triple is versatile if you will be riding mtb trails or a lot of climbing.

    the surly frame is very versatile, but it is heavy and the steel they use is generic (the rear triangle is easilly deformed...). but I would expect a cared-for steel frame to last a long time.

    if you do get the surly, I would definitely recommend the 105 build. when I got the normal surly build it has some very cheapo parts.

    the fork on my bike has amazing mud clearance- I think the built-up specialized bikes have the same fork, but i'd have to check. if so, that's a huge plus in my book. also, a flattened top tube is very nice for carries. and the bike should be a lot lighter. lots of plusses for the specialized.

    marc

  15. #15
    antisocialite dirtyphotons's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vpower
    you might be able to talk a specialized dealer into ordering a surly if you commit to buying one of the two bikes.
    yes. lots of helpful advice here, but as usual it all boils down to how the bike feels under your butt.

    only shops that carry specialized can order specialized bikes but almost any shop can order the surly. so i'd recommend exactly what vpower suggested. you may need to put down a deposit, just make it understood that you can apply that money to whichever of the two you prefer.

    the shop will likely not have a problem with this, as surlys are very popular and they shouldn't have a problem unloading it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Sheldon Brown
    Because when fashion conflicts with function, I vote for function.

  16. #16
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    Awesome! You guys are great and I really appreciate all of this information. I think I will go to my LBS and present the idea of me putting down a deposit and having it apply to which ever bike I decide on. And if there is a problem I guess I should look for another LBS to do business with.

    Best Regards.

  17. #17
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    don't shoot me, but
    even though this is a cx forum
    what about a steel framed bike
    few cx come this way but many touring do
    so for a novice, who wants the fat tires of a cx but drop bars, thus not a hybrid or fitness bike
    which is better, a cx bike or touring bike, and steel vs aluminum (i know this question is a big one)
    i want to get a bike asap
    trek touring 520 has end bar shifter and does not appeal to me for that reason
    it will be a specialized tricross sport or comp vs a jamis or fuji steel frame or maybe a surly
    ideas and suggestions welcomed and appreciated!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by archermd
    don't shoot me, but
    even though this is a cx forum
    what about a steel framed bike
    few cx come this way but many touring do
    so for a novice, who wants the fat tires of a cx but drop bars, thus not a hybrid or fitness bike
    which is better, a cx bike or touring bike, and steel vs aluminum (i know this question is a big one)
    i want to get a bike asap
    trek touring 520 has end bar shifter and does not appeal to me for that reason
    it will be a specialized tricross sport or comp vs a jamis or fuji steel frame or maybe a surly
    ideas and suggestions welcomed and appreciated!
    Given that the Surly Cross-Check is steel and a CX bike it might be your best option. If you are doing long loaded touring though the chain stay length may be an issue depending on your shoe size. Keep that in mind. If you really just want a steel CX I think the Cross-Check seems like a winner. I'm still doing this search myself. I don't actually own any CX bike...yet.

  19. #19
    I ride my bike Revtor's Avatar
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    depends.. are you going to be doing much touring? If not, then get the cross bike. it will tour just fine for all but the most extreme trips..
    If you plan on regularly touring then Id say go for the touring bike, it'll hold up better under heavier loads, and you won't have to swap out drivetrain parts for that first trip..
    How do you ride? are you gunning for it most of the time, breathing heavy because you like it? Well then the cross bike will definitely be your choice of the two, it has a racier overall geometry.

    I have a poprad, it can feel roadie, commute/fred-y, and definitely expedition tour-y. I did have to swap drivetrain parts for tour duty, but they've been on ever since.. its a truly do it all machine.
    Im 150 lbs though, a bit lighter.. Limits though of course.. when fully loaded, it definitely can feel whippy, and the wide range cassette isn't as slick of a ride as the road cassette was. Otherwise considering it does anything that I ask of it its the perfect bike imho.

    Go Cross!!!!


    ~Steve

  20. #20
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    hi
    my riding has not even begun
    it will be mild for sure in the beginning and not much touring ag all
    i have looked at and considered touring frames since there are more steel frame options that way

    i really was about to order a specialized tricross comp until others suggested the sport version or that i give it up and go for a steel framed bike

    that was the beginning of the current wave of confusion

    i wonder if my body and skill level will allow me to even notice the difference between aluminum and steel since i am 230 pounds (on my way to 185-190) and my butt and body feel like i am bouncing on a hard pogo stick on evey bike, aluminum and carbon, that i have test riden thus far... i am a true novice at this point, although i rode in the past, that was over 25 years ago, so it is like starting over, and trust me when i tell y'all that i was happy just ot be able to keep my balance on those test rides!
    so, do i jsut get the spec tricross, sport or comp, or should i try for a steel bike?????

  21. #21
    ROM 6:23 flipped4bikes's Avatar
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    Get the TriX Sport if you want a wide range of gearing for less money than the Comp. If you want all the fancy stuff, get the Comp. And you'll get a lighter bike. The TriX rides a bit stiff, for it's aluminum not steel. Ride a bunch of different bikes: aluminum, steel, 'cross, touring, road, hybrid. Get to know what you like or appeals to you.
    Every time we let a vehicle pass there is a little bit of compromise. But compromise allows the city to function and allows cyclists to function in the city. The trick is not to eliminate compromise but to learn how to work safely within it.

    --Robert Hurst

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by old and new
    The advantage of a Specialized is that you can see the bike,ride it, not just see a picture of the bare frame, then fancy yourself "creating your own bike", you would be hard pressed to improve the way Specialized is spec'd. Specialized is quite good at that.
    Lot to be said for this. I was between 2 sizes (LBS suggested same size as a road bike, but I thought a size down for a CX bike) so my LBS ordered both for me to test - turns out that the size down fit much better. As someone said above, they are both great bikes and you'd be happy with either, so perhaps sheer looks can tip the scale. I happen to really like the all black look of my Tricross Comp Triple.

  23. #23
    Poop stirrer AFPJ's Avatar
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    I bought an 06 Tricross Comp on Craigslist for $950 a couple of months ago. I bought it for road riding and my 28mi commute. I love this bike- even to the point when I'm trying to find an excuse to get a true roadie, I just can't. It does everything I could possibly ask of it.

  24. #24
    ROM 6:23 flipped4bikes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by reppans
    Lot to be said for this. I was between 2 sizes (LBS suggested same size as a road bike, but I thought a size down for a CX bike) so my LBS ordered both for me to test - turns out that the size down fit much better. As someone said above, they are both great bikes and you'd be happy with either, so perhaps sheer looks can tip the scale. I happen to really like the all black look of my Tricross Comp Triple.
    Black is beautiful!

    I'll chime in on the TriX sizing. It has a "semi"-compact frame, where the top tube slopes downward front to rear. This give more standover clearance as opposed to a regular frame of similar size. Though I could ride a TriX of a larger size than I would normally consider, I went with the next size down too.
    Every time we let a vehicle pass there is a little bit of compromise. But compromise allows the city to function and allows cyclists to function in the city. The trick is not to eliminate compromise but to learn how to work safely within it.

    --Robert Hurst

  25. #25
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    No necessarily "cross bikes", but the Bianchi road steel bikes will take mudguards (fenders). Another good bet would be the Soma Smoothie, which has a nice relaxed seating position.

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