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View Poll Results: What is the most Bombproof Cyclocross Bike?

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  • Bianchi Axis

    2 13.33%
  • Fuji Cross

    0 0%
  • Kona Jake the Snake

    6 40.00%
  • Other (Cannondale, Jamis, etc.)

    7 46.67%
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Danger is my middle name. lucklust's Avatar
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    Most Bombproof Cyclocross Bike? (poll)

    I need a bike that can do a century one weekend, and gnarly drops the next... what should I get???
    Yeah, I'm still pretty.

  2. #2
    Kev
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    Gnarly drops.. Sounds like you need a MTB for that and a road bike for the centuries. Instead of laying down a $1000+ on a Cyclocross howa bout spending around $500-600 on a hardtail then around $600 or so on a road bike. You will spend about the same amount of money. You wont' get as high end components but you will have two bikes suited for two different things. A cyclocross bike is designed for off-roading but not sure if it will do what you need as, what do you consider a Gnarly drop? A surly karate monkey it is a strong frame that should take a beating.

  3. #3
    Danger is my middle name. lucklust's Avatar
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    "Gnarly drops" means about 1 foot max, pretty rough for a cyclocross bike. To get to those drops, though, I have to ride up some evil-steep hills, so a cyclocross bike would be nice. The terrain isn't too rough, even sort of paved in parts (like the steep uphill). You mentioned a hardtail... what about the cannondale cyclocross headshock? Does anyone know anything about that?

    http://www.cannondale.com/bikes/03/cusa/model-3XS8.html
    Yeah, I'm still pretty.

  4. #4
    Kev
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    When you said Gnarly drops I was thinking about 5-6 foot drops. A cyclocross would deal well then for you're needs.

    I can't comment on the Cannondale never ridden one, I personaly don't like the idea of front suspension on anything but my MTB since means more weight, but that is a personal opinion. But with basicaly 1 inch suspension I can't see it adding to much weight and has lockout so will help when riding roads. I own the Fuji Cross and so do a few others on this forum, it is a great bike. Good component group Shimano 105, and rides great despite being aluminum is not a real harsh ride.

  5. #5
    Super Biker Mtn Mike's Avatar
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    None of the above. Although I am not a cyclocrosser, I have a Surly and it can do anything. Today it was a 60 mile group road ride, last week it was mountain biking on steep rocky single track. Although I probably wouldn't do huge drops with it, I think it's a pretty strong bike. The wheelset would be the limiting factor (maybe) in really rough terain. Probably all cyclocross bikes are durable, but I agree with the above posts; just get two bikes if you're going to the extremes you talk about. The only other cross bike i've ridden is the Axis. It's a nice bike, but probably oriented more specifically for cross racing that anything else.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Diesel's Avatar
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    Lemond Poprad is built like a tank I am a larger rider and I have given the frame a real beating. It is still my favorite over my other rigs including dual suspension and ti road. But that is not to say it is the be all, end all of cross bikes.

  7. #7
    Senior Member roadrage's Avatar
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    I'd go Kona Jake the Snake. They are very durable and work for road too. The Surly Cross Check would be another great choice. I have both, but tend to use the Surly for more road and commuting use and the Kona more for trail/singletrack use.

  8. #8
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    I'll second the Poprad. I've got the older model with the straight front fork. It really is built like a tank, and it's not that heavy. Mine is less than 20 lbs now. I put skinny road tires on for my club rides, and fat knobbies when I go off road.

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